Cases reported "Periapical Granuloma"

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1/7. Peripheral giant cell granuloma--a case report.

    Peripheral giant cell granuloma is a lesion arising mainly from the connective tissue of gingiva or periosteum of alveolar ridge. A case of peripheral giant cell granuloma involving a deciduous molar and the succedaneous tooth is reported. The lesion was large and interfered with occlusion. Surgical excision of the lesion along with the deciduous first molar was done. The underlying permanent first premolar was also involved, and had to be removed. The importance of an adequate salivary flow and maintenance of oral hygiene in the prevention of such lesions is stressed.
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2/7. Exarticulation and reimplantation utilizing guided tissue regeneration: a case report.

    The extraction and reimplantation of teeth is a technique that has been practiced for many years, resulting in successful retention of teeth for up to 30 years. Although evidence confirming the advantages of this technique is limited, clinical observations and histologic examinations have revealed some important factors that are prerequisites for success: limitation of the time the tooth is exposed to the extraoral environment and preservation of vital periodontal tissue attachments on root surfaces. The latter goal can be achieved by gentle, atraumatic removal of the tooth from its socket, and hence the term exarticulation and reimplantation is more representative of the technique. In the present case report, a maxillary lateral incisor with a developmental defect was treated by exarticulation and reimplantation and application of calcium sulfate. Exarticulation and reimplantation seems to be a useful clinical procedure, but controlled studies are required to confirm its efficacy.
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3/7. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia involving a mandibular lateral incisor.

    AIM: To report a case of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) affecting a single tooth misdiagnosed as an inflammatory periapical lesion.SUMMARY: The patient, a black 47-year-old woman complained of pain affecting the right side of the mandible. Routine X-ray examination discovered a periapical radiolucency on the mandibular left lateral incisor (tooth 32), which was otherwise normal and not carious. As the response of this tooth to a vitality test was doubtful, the lesion was diagnosed as a periapical granuloma or cyst secondary to pulpal necrosis. Endodontic treatment and curettage of the periapical lesion were performed, and histological examination of the curettage material revealed a localized osseous dysplasia. KEY learning POINTS: FCOD may rarely affect only one tooth, resembling a periapical granuloma or cyst. Careful diagnosis is of paramount importance in cases of questionable periapical lesions affecting normal-looking teeth, before beginning treatment. FCOD generally requires no treatment. biopsy is warranted in case of doubt.
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4/7. Odontogenic sinus tract to the neck skin: a case report.

    We describe a 22-year-old woman with neck skin sinus tract that developed as a consequence of dental infection. The patient was treated twice in an inappropriate way with recurrence of the sinus tract. We opted for an extraction of the tooth. This case illustrates the need for cooperative diagnostic referrals between physicians and dentists.
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5/7. Submandibular tuberculous lymphadenitis after endodontic treatment of the mandibular first premolar tooth: report of a case.

    Cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis (scrofula) is an infectious granulomatous disease that requires a precise diagnosis. The differential diagnosis involves mainly the pathologic conditions involving the regional lymph nodes and the submandibulary salivary glands. Although tuberculous lesions generally develop secondary to pulmonary disease, clinical manifestations are occasionally seen with no evidence of involvement of the lungs. In this report, a case of tuberculous submandibular lymphadenitis developing after endodontic treatment of the mandibular first premolar tooth is described.
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6/7. Symptomatic foreign body reaction to haemostatic alginate.

    Kaltostat, a haemostatic wound dressing made from non-woven sodium calcium alginate fibres is becoming more frequently and widely used by practitioners. We report a florid foreign body giant cell reaction elicited by Kaltostat which had been used to obtain haemostasis in an apicectomy cavity on an upper lateral incisor approximately 7 months earlier. The case demonstrates that alginate fibres left in situ may elicit a long-lasting and symptomatic adverse foreign body reaction. This material should be reserved for problematic haemorrhage and be removed from the tooth socket soon after haemostasis.
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7/7. Surgical treatment of a lateroradicular lesion on an invaginated lateral incisor (dens in dente).

    The complex anatomy of invaginated teeth makes their endodontic treatment difficult. The case described here reports the successful management of an invaginated tooth presenting with a lateroradicular lesion. After the root was surgically exposed and the radicular defect was cleaned, gutta percha was sealed with a zinc oxide eugenol cement, heat-compacted under 5 degrees, and then cold-burnished. The osseous cavity was filled with Biocorail. Radiographs at 1 month and 5 years show periapical healing with osseous formation. This procedure, resulting in minimal loss of hard tissues, permitted retention of the tooth.
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