Cases reported "Periapical Periodontitis"

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1/47. A case of an odontogenic cutaneous sinus tract.

    CASE REPORT: A 22-year-old female presented with a draining sinus tract on her left cheek. The tooth responsible was examined clinicopathologically. On clinical examination, the mandibular left first molar tooth was restored with an amalgam filling. Radiographic examination revealed base or pulp capping material below the restoration and a radiolucent periapical lesion surrounding the distal root apex. Conservative non-surgical root canal treatment was performed; 10 months later, the sinus had healed completely and the periapical lesion had resolved. Histopathological examination of pulp tissue recovered during treatment revealed foreign bodies, made up of capping material and amalgam, associated with chronic inflammation. These findings suggested that chronic inflammation in the pulp tissue had resulted in a draining sinus tract.
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2/47. Repairing iatrogenic root perforations.

    BACKGROUND: Post preparation is an integral part of restoring endodontically treated teeth in indicated cases. Iatrogenic perforation of the root can result from preparing post space and can severely compromise the prognosis of the tooth. CASE DESCRIPTION: Two years after a patient's maxillary lateral incisor was restored with a post-retained composite resin, he went to a dental school emergency clinic with a chief complaint of soft-tissue swelling adjacent to the tooth. The authors took a periapical radiograph that revealed evidence of a circumscribed radiolucent lesion associated with the distal midroot area and a periapical radiolucency. Based on the radiograph, the authors suspected that the canal preparation for the post and the post placement had perforated the root at the base of the post. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The authors used a combined surgical and orthograde approach with a biocompatible restorative material and a clear, plastic light-transmitting post to repair the iatrogenic perforation.
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3/47. Unusual case of bilateral talon cusp associated with dens invaginatus.

    CASE REPORT: This paper presents a rare case of bilateral talon cusp in permanent maxillary central incisors, one on the labial and another on the lingual surface of each tooth. The condition was associated with dens invaginatus in a maxillary permanent lateral incisor, but no developmental syndrome was identified. The left central incisor required no treatment because the aesthetic appearance was satisfactory and neither occlusal interferences nor caries were present. After careful investigation of the right lateral incisor, a sealant was applied. Root canal treatment was indicated for the right central incisor that had a wide open apex with thin, weak, divergent walls, and an apical radiolucency.
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4/47. Delayed apical healing after apexification treatment of non-vital immature tooth: a case report.

    We report the endodontic treatment of a non-vital permanent immature tooth in which unexpected complications such as exacerbation of apical periodontitis followed by external root resorption occurred after that the initial stages of the healing process were clinically and radiographically evident. After continued treatment stable repair was obtained.
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5/47. periapical abscess formation and resolution adjacent to dental implants: a clinical report.

    The vitality of teeth adjacent to dental implants should be considered in the treatment planning of dental implants. Both the restorability of an endodontically treated tooth and the risk of infection of the adjacent implant are important factors in planning for success. Given the illustrated difficulties and difficulties associated with resolving periapical infections of teeth and implants, it is essential to define the vitality of teeth by careful pulp testing and to consider the integrity of existing questionable, endodontically treated teeth before implant treatment. The risk of periapical infection at teeth adjacent to implants must be minimized.
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6/47. Implant failures associated with asymptomatic endodontically treated teeth.

    BACKGROUND: Endosseous root-formed implants occasionally fail to osseointegrate. Causes of failure include infection, overheating of the bone, habitual smoking, systemic disease, transmucosal overloading, excessive surgical trauma and implant placement adjacent to teeth demonstrating periapical pathology. CASE DESCRIPTION: In this article, the authors present another possible cause of implant failure. The cases of four patients who received endosseous root-formed implants are discussed. Each patient demonstrated signs of infection after initial implant placement. The common factor in each failing implant was its placement adjacent to an asymptomatic endodontically treated tooth with no clinical or radiographic evidence of pathology. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: These patients demonstrate the importance of evaluating and possibly retreating or extracting adjacent endodontically treated teeth before placing implants.
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7/47. Apparent periapical repair without operative intervention: a case report and discussion.

    CASE REPORT: A case is described where substantial reduction of an established periapical lesion appeared to take place in the absence of operative intervention, and as the crown of the tooth was progressively destroyed by dental caries. The case raises debate on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and monitoring of endodontic lesions, and may stimulate renewed research interest in these most fundamental elements of clinical endodontology.
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8/47. Garre's osteomyelitis of an unusual origin in a 8-year-old child. A case report.

    Garre's osteomyelitis is a type of chronic osteomyelitis that primarily affects children and adolescents. Although the disease is well described in the dental literature and is usually associated with an odontogenic infection resulting from caries, a number of other causative factors have been occasionally reported, such as a dental extraction or a mild periodontitis. There have also been cases of unknown aetiology. This paper describes a case of Garre's osteomyelitis in an 8-year-old child, in whom the condition arose following a local periodontal infection in an ectopically erupting first permanent molar that was in infraocclusion. The lesion remained unresolved for a period of over 6 months as a result of misdiagnosis, following a number of unsuccessful treatment attempts. Identification of the true cause and treatment through periodontal surgery resulted in lesion resolution and resolved the diagnostic problem. dentists should be aware that the periodontium may be a potential source of infection for Garre's osteomyelitis in children, particularly in the presence of ectopically erupting posterior teeth. In such cases, periodontal treatment should be sufficient to treat the disease and extraction of the tooth involved may not be necessary.
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9/47. Revascularization of an immature permanent tooth with apical periodontitis and sinus tract.

    A necrotic immature mandibular second premolar with periapical involvement in a 13-year-old patient was treated. Instead of the standard root canal treatment protocol and apexification, antimicrobial agents were used in the canal, after which the canal was left empty. Radiographic examination showed the start of apical closure 5 months after the completion of the antimicrobial protocol. Thickening of the canal wall and complete apical closure was confirmed 30 months after the treatment, indicating the revascularization potential of a young permanent tooth pulp into a bacteria-free root canal space.
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ranking = 2.5
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10/47. Delayed eruption of premolars with periodontitis of primary predecessors and a cystic lesion: a case report.

    Apical periodontitis after pulp therapy in a primary tooth can cause delayed eruption of the permanent successor. A case of bilateral delayed eruption of mandibular premolars is presented. The patient. a 13-year-old girl, was referred by her dentist. Oral findings showed that the right first and left second primary molars were retained. Other premolars had erupted. An orthopantomogram revealed apical periodontitis, affecting both retained primary molars. The right first mandibular premolar was impacted against the alveolar bone and root of the second premolar, and there was a large cystic lesion in close association with the left second mandibular premolar. Both primary molars were extracted, and the cystic lesion was treated by marsupialization. Fenestration and traction were performed on the right first premolar. Correct tooth alignment was achieved with orthodontic appliances. If the problem had been detected earlier, treatment of the premolars might have been easier. Clinical and radiological follow-up, therefore, of primary teeth that have undergone pulp therapy procedures should be performed until eruption of succedaneous teeth.
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keywords = tooth, eruption
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