Cases reported "Periodontal Abscess"

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1/36. Toxic shock syndrome secondary to a dental abscess.

    A 9-year-old girl presented with arthralgia and myalgia which progressed to developing renal failure and overwhelming septic shock. The underlying cause was assumed to be a periodontal abscess from an upper right deciduous canine tooth. The pus from the abscess grew a toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-producing staphylococcus aureus. This case illustrates the importance of an oral surgical review of patients presenting with features of toxic shock syndrome if the source of the infection is not immediately obvious.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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2/36. guideline of surgical management based on diffusion of descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    BACKGROUND: Descending necrotizing mediastinitis resulting from oropharyngeal abscess, is a serious, life-threatening infection. Exisiting strategies for surgical management, such as transcervical mediastinal drainage or aggressive thoracotomic drainage, remain controversial. methods: Four patients, (three males and one female) were treated for descending necrotizing mediastinitis resulting from oropharyngeal infection. Two had peritonsillar abscesses, while the others experienced dental abscess and submaxillaritis. Descending necrotizing mediastinitis received its classification according to the degree of diffusion of infection diagnosed by computed tomography. mediastinitis in two cases, (Localized descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type I), was localized to the upper mediastinal space above the carina. In the others, infection extended to the lower anterior mediastinum (Diffuse descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIA), and to both anterior and posterior lower mediastinum (Diffuse descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIB). The spread of infection to the pleural cavity occurred in three cases. RESULTS: The surgical outcome concerning each of the patients was successful. Radical cervicotomy (unilateral in three patients, bilateral in the other) in conjunction with mechanical ventilation with continuous postoperative positive airway pressure, was performed in all cases. tracheostomy was established in three patients and pharyngostomy in two. The two descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type I cases were successfully managed with transcervical mediastinal drainage. The descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIA case received treatment through transcervicotomy and anterior mediastinal drainage through a subxiphoidal incision. The patient with descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIB required posterior mediastinal drainage through a right standard thoracotomy followed by left minimal thoracotomy. CONCLUSIONS: The mediastinal infection, the extent of which has been accurately determined by computed tomograms, necessitates radical cervicotomy followed by pleuromediastinal drainage. Situations where infection has spread to posterior medisatinum, particularly when it reaches in the level of the carina (descending necrotizing mediastinitis-type I), may not always require aggressive mediastinal drainage. In comparison, diffuse descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIB demands complete mediastinal drainage with debridement via thoracotomy. Subxiphoidal mediastinal drainage without sternotomy may provide adequate drainage in diffuse descending necrotizing mediastinitis-Type IIA.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = dental
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3/36. A five-year-old with a dental abscess: a case study.

    dental caries remain one of the most common disorders of childhood in the United States. Often nurse practitioners (NPs) will see children who are suffering from the complications of a dental carie, such as a dental abscess and/or cellulitis. This article describes the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented at an evening clinic with tooth pain, fever, and facial swelling. Three treatment choices are discussed: (1) 400 mg of amoxicillin (Augmentin), by mouth, with comfort measures, and return to the clinic in the morning; (2) 2 g of ceftriaxone by injection, with comfort measures, and return to the clinic in the morning; (3) or hospitalize via emergency department for intravenous fluids and antibiotics. The treatment that was chosen not only takes into account the disease process, but also the impact of this choice on the family. A model for the progression of dental caries in low-income groups with recommendations for prevention is also presented.
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ranking = 1.7896423128834
keywords = dental, caries
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4/36. Contemporary treatment of the resorbed avulsed tooth: a case report.

    This report describes the treatment sequence after traumatic loss of a maxillary central incisor in a 15-year-old patient. Following extraoral root canal treatment and initially successful replantation, the case presented 9 years later with complete root resorption. After augmentation with an autologous mandibular corticocancellous graft, a dental implant was placed in a second stage surgery. The case highlights the challenge facing clinicians in providing the appropriate standard of care for today's treatment options.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = dental
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5/36. Radiographic bone fill following debridement of a periodontal abscess. A case report.

    A periodontal abscess often develops in association with deepened periodontal pockets. Traditional management is by establishing drainage and prescribing antibiotics. This is usually followed by surgical pocket reduction. This case report discusses the remarkable healing of a periodontal abscess by establishing drainage alone without resorting to surgical pocket reduction. A 42-year-old white male presented with swollen gingivae associated with the mesiolingual of tooth #23. Increased probing depth and suppuration were evident. Radiographic bone loss on mesial #23 was present. A diagnosis of periodontal abscess was established. The abscess was drained through the orifice of the pocket. The patient failed to return for follow-up as instructed. A year later, the patient came back. Clinical evaluation showed healthy gingival tissues with probing depth of 3 mm on the mesiolingual of tooth #23. Radiographic evaluation showed bone fill of the osseous defect on the mesial of #23. The results of this case suggest that sufficient time should be allowed for healing prior to surgical pocket reduction.
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ranking = 3.0671042618769E-5
keywords = white
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6/36. Median mental sinus in twins.

    Sinus on the chin can be the result of a chronic apical abscess due to pulp necrosis of a mandibular anterior tooth. The tooth is usually asymptomatic, and a dental cause is therefore not apparent to the patient or the unsuspecting clinician. Not infrequently, the patient may seek treatment from a dermatologist or general surgeon instead of a dentist. Excision and repair of the fistula may be carried out with subsequent breakdown because the dental pathology is not removed. This paper reports the presence of median mental sinus of dental origin in twins. One case healed following root canal therapy while the other required both root canal therapy and surgery to eliminate the infection.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = dental
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7/36. Aplastic anemia: current concepts and dental management.

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare blood dyscrasia in which the peripheral blood cells are decreased because of bone marrow failure. The clinical course reflects the severity of pancytopenia and is unpredictable for the individual. hemorrhage and infection remain the major threats to these patients. Recent advances in transfusion medicine, infection management, bone marrow transplantation, and immunosuppressive therapy have improved survival of patients with AA. oral manifestations of AA are common and may have serious sequelae. Two cases of acute periodontal infection associated with AA are presented. Dental management guidelines are presented in the context of interdisciplinary care.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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8/36. Are dental infections a cause of brain abscess? Case report and review of the literature.

    Dental pathology and/or treatment have been linked to a small number of brain abscesses as possible sources of infection. A further case is presented, in which a dental site is implicated. A review of the evidence was undertaken. A wide range of dental procedures had been implicated. In some cases the brain isolate was not of dental origin. In many, the diagnosis was one of exclusion. In order to confirm the role of odontogenic infection in the pathogenesis of brain abscess, modern sampling techniques should be used to precisely identify the isolates. The causal organism should be identified in both oral and cranial sites.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = dental
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9/36. An unrecognized etiology for pyogenic hepatic abscesses in normal hosts: dental disease.

    Cryptogenic pyogenic hepatic abscesses are a diagnosis of exclusion. We have identified two patients with severe dental disease at the time of the diagnosis of their liver abscess. In both cases, oral flora was cultured from the abscess. Unlike a previous report, both patients were immunocompetent. When compared with a group of patients with liver abscesses and diverticulitis, two differences were found. In contrast to the single abscesses seen in 10 of 10 patients with diverticulitis, the patients with dental disease had multiple abscesses (p < 0.02). In addition, fusobacterium nucleatum was cultured from both dental disease associated abscesses but only one of the diverticulitis associated liver abscesses (p < 0.05). If a liver abscess is thought to be cryptogenic, a thorough dental exam is recommended.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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10/36. A lot of clot.

    A 37-year-old man presented with fever and a red, painful right eye. He had proptosis, conjunctival chemosis, and ophthalmoplegia OD. The patient had extremely poor dentition and had self decompressed a dental abscess prior to admission. magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbital revealed extraocular muscle engorgement and a dilated superior ophthalmic vein OD. Orbital echography revealed a lack of flow in the right superior ophthalmic vein. An extensive hematologic evaluation for infection and inflammation was negative. A chest radiograph showed a lung abscess for which he received intravenous antibiotics. Over time, the periorbital erythema, ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, and pain resolved. Repeat MRI showed resolution of the orbital findings and repeat chest x-ray showed resolution of the left upper lobe abscess.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = dental
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