Cases reported "Periodontal Cyst"

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1/26. Rapid cystic involvement of a lower third molar.

    Cystic change can occur in association with partially and unerupted lower third molars. This case report describes an inflammatory paradental cyst which developed over a relatively short period of time and presented with acute symptoms.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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2/26. The lateral periodontal cyst: aetiology, clinical significance and diagnosis.

    The lateral periodontal cyst (LPC) is a relatively uncommon but widely recognized odontogenic cyst of developmental origin. It is found mostly in adults and has no sex predilection. LPC is usually discovered during routine radiographic examination, is located mainly between the roots of vital mandibular canines and premolars, and seldom causes pain or other clinical symptoms. The defect appears on radiographs as a round or teardrop-shaped, well circumscribed radiolucency. Due to its location it can easily be misdiagnosed as a lesion of endodontic origin. In this paper, two cases of lateral periodontal cysts are presented. In the first case, the patient (woman, 62 years old) complained of an asymptomatic gingival swelling in the region between the right maxillary canine and premolar. The radiographic examination revealed a well circumscribed radiolucency with a radiopaque margin between the roots of the canine and premolar. The adjacent teeth had vital pulp. Surgical enucleation of the lesion was performed and the histological examination revealed that the lesion was a "lateral periodontal cyst of developmental origin". In the second case, the patient (women, 44 years old) complained of a swelling in the area of tooth 32. During radiographic examination a well circumscribed radiolucency between the roots of the lateral incisor and the canine was discovered. Surgical enucleation of the lesion was performed and the histological examination revealed that the lesion was a "lateral periodontal cyst of developmental origin".
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ranking = 126.58736859551
keywords = gingival
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3/26. Unusual surgical approach in a bilateral case of mandibular buccal infected cyst.

    In the new edition of WHO's "Histological typing of odontogenic tumors", the mandibular infected buccal cyst, that is associated with the lower first or second permanent molars, is considered a paradental cyst as well as the inflammatory collateral cyst, which is usually related to the lower third molar. The lesion occurs on the buccal and lateral aspects of the roots of mandibular molars with vital pulp, at the eruption time, in children aged between 6 and 10 years. The inflammation is always present in these cysts and may have an important role in their pathogenesis because it stimulates hyperplasia and cystic change of the reduced enamel epithelium or the epithelial cell rests of Malassez. The authors report the case of a 7-year-old girl, in whom both first mandibular molars were affected by an infected buccal cyst. A different surgical approach was performed with marsupialization on the left side and cystectomy on the right side. The case reported here seems to be interesting because it is the second well documented case of bilateral mandibular infected cyst associated with unerupted molars and because the adopted treatment differs from the therapeutical approach suggested in the literature. A 6-year follow-up demonstrates a correct dental and bone evolution on both mandibular molar sides.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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4/26. Gingival cysts in the adult.

    BACKGROUND: Gingival cysts in the adult are unusual cysts of odontogenic origin with less than 100 reported, including this series. Even rarer are cases of multiple gingival cysts. This paper reports the second largest retrospective study of biopsy cases of adult gingival cysts with a spectrum of their features and another case of multiple gingival cysts. methods: The files of a biopsy service were reviewed for the most recent 10-year period. Data collected included location, age, gender, clinical features, clinical diagnosis, and histologic features. These were compared to previous reports. There was also a case report of multiple cysts. RESULTS: Twenty-two adult gingival cysts were retrieved, 2 of which were multiple. They are uncommon cysts of odontogenic origin, noted primarily in the fifth and sixth decades with only a slight predilection for females. They occur more in the mandible on the labial attached gingiva of the anterior teeth. histology shows a very thin, uninflamed wall lined by a very thin squamoid or cuboidal epithelium. Multiple cysts are very rare. CONCLUSIONS: Gingival cysts in the adult are uncommon cysts that are diagnosed at the clinical level about 50% of the time, with others being confused with a mucocele. They may be bluish due to the fluid and may cause pressure resorption of the labial bone, yielding a radiolucency sometimes confused with a lateral periodontal cyst. Treatment consists of an excisional biopsy.
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ranking = 506.34947438204
keywords = gingival
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5/26. Paradental cyst mimicking a radicular cyst on the adjacent tooth: case report and review of terminology.

    A distinctive form of paradental cyst can occur on the buccal and apical aspects of erupted mandibular molars. This cyst has peculiar clinical and radiographic features, although the microscopic findings are the same as those of odontogenic inflammatory cysts. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems can occur when this lesion is misinterpreted as a radicular cyst. The purpose of this paper is to present an additional case of a paradental cyst in the buccal and mesial aspects of a mandibular second molar involving the apical area of a mandibular first molar. The difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and controversies regarding terminology are also discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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6/26. Paradental cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    The origin of paradental cysts is related to inflammatory processes, especially pericoronaritis involving impacted or semi-impacted teeth. The authors present a case of paradental cyst related to lower second molar that did not show clinical evidence of inflammatory process. The main aspects related to its classification, diagnosis and clinical characteristics are also discussed.
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ranking = 6
keywords = dental
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7/26. Gingival cyst of adult--a case report with unusual findings.

    Gingival cysts of adult are rare odontogenic cysts of developmental origin. They occur as swellings on the gingiva, most commonly between 5th and 6th decade of life and usually do not exceed 1cm in size. The epithelial lining of these cysts are thin non-keratinised and are thought to arise from the rests of dental lamina. We report a case of multicystic variant of a gingival cyst in adult patient with few unusual findings regarding the age of occurrence, size of the lesion and the histopathological appearance. Gingival cyst of adult occurring in an 18-year-old male patient, measuring about 3 x 4 sq. cms on the facial attached gingiva in relation to 42, 43, and 44 was observed. The histopathological findings were that of the rare multicystic variant with keratinised lining and epithelial plaques in the lining. The lumen of the cyst showed keratin with one of the lumen showing calcifications within it. This case documents many interesting and unusual findings in gingival cyst of adults. It appears to be the first documentation of gingival cyst of adult containing calcifications within the cystic lumen.
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ranking = 380.76210578653
keywords = gingival, dental
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8/26. Cutaneous draining sinus tract of odontogenic origin: unusual presentation of a challenging diagnosis.

    A 44-year-old woman presented with a chronically draining lesion on her cheek just lateral to the nasofacial sulcus. The lesion was refractory to treatment with oral antibiotics. physical examination revealed poor dentition, and a panoramic radiograph demonstrated periapical abscesses in the maxillary right lateral incisor and canine. A diagnosis of cutaneous fistula of odontogenic origin was made, and the patient was treated with tooth extraction. The cutaneous fistula subsequently resolved. Intraoral examinations and radiographs are critical for making the diagnosis of cutaneous draining sinus tract of odontogenic origin. Many patients undergo unnecessary surgical therapies before having the correct diagnosis made, but root canal therapy or surgical extraction is the treatment of choice. A dental origin must be considered for any chronically draining sinus of the face or neck.
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ranking = 1.5805166216154
keywords = dental, fistula
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9/26. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as an endodontic-periodontic lesion.

    BACKGROUND: Regardless of advances in diagnosis and treatment during the past 40 years, the overall 5-year survival rates for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cancers have only slightly improved and remain around 50%. Thus, the early diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma by health care providers are essential in achieving a good prognosis. We report a case of invasive squamous cell carcinoma that presented as a benign endodontic-periodontic lesion with a 7-mm periodontal pocket on tooth #15 in a 40-year-old, non-smoking woman. The subsequent management of the case is also discussed. The study was conducted in accordance with the helsinki declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000. methods: Our patient was seen for a comprehensive periodontal examination including a periodontal charting, occlusal analysis, study casts, electronic pulp test for tooth #15, and complete mouth periapical radiographs. As there was a periapical radiolucency, an endodontic consultation was obtained. A periodontal flap surgical procedure was performed on teeth #13 to #15, and as there was bone erosion into the maxillary sinus, a biopsy of the soft tissue was submitted to the local hospital for histological analysis. RESULTS: The biopsied lesion was diagnosed as invasive, moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma with focal spindle and clear cell differentiation (grade II to III of IV). Bone invasion was also identified. The treatment of the carcinoma involved a hemimaxillectomy with the removal of the maxillary left posterior teeth. The patient remained free of tumor for 5 years after the initial presentation. CONCLUSIONS: Patient education and periodic oral cancer examinations by dental professionals are necessary to reduce diagnostic delay and improve prognosis. This case report emphasizes the important role of dental professionals, especially periodontists and endodontists, of being aware that squamous cell carcinoma may manifest itself clinically and/or radiographically as a common periodontal or endodontic lesion.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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10/26. Paradental cyst: report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: The paradental cyst is an odontogenic lesion of inflammatory origin that has few clinical signs and symptoms apart from recurring acute episodes. A well-defined radiolucency associated with the roots or distal to the crown may be seen radiographically. The purpose of this article is to report on different aspects of two cases involving paradental cysts. In the first case, the patient complained about recurring pericoronitis. A semilunar-shaped radiolucency on the distal aspect of the mandibular third molar was noted on the periapical radiograph. In the second case, the patient's main complaint was chronic trauma of the overlying mucosa. Radiographs revealed an enlarged pericoronal space. methods: In both cases, the mandibular third molar was extracted due to a lack of space. Lesional samples were sent for histopathologic analysis. RESULTS: In the first case, the drainage of cystic fluid and a regular concavity were found during tooth removal. In the second case, a nodular lesion was found adhering to the disto-buccal surface of the tooth arising from the distal wall of a periodontal pocket. The histopathologic analysis revealed a hyperplastic stratified squamous epithelium with arcading lining a fibrous capsule with inflammatory infiltrate, resulting in a final diagnosis of a paradental cyst. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of a paradental cyst should be considered when recurrent inflammatory periodontal processes are associated with partially erupted vital teeth, even when characteristic radiographic findings are absent. Definitive diagnosis requires a clinicopathologic correlation incorporating surgical, radiographic, and histologic findings.
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ranking = 8
keywords = dental
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