Cases reported "Periodontal Pocket"

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1/6. Treatment of Papillon-Lefevre syndrome periodontitis.

    BACKGROUND, AIMS: Conventional mechanical treatment of Papillon-Lefevre syndrome periodontitis has a poor prognosis. This report describes an effective antimicrobial treatment of rapidly progressing periodontitis in an 11-year old girl having Papillon-Lefevre syndrome. METHOD: Clinical examination included conventional periodontal measurements and radiographic analysis. Occurrence of major suspected periodontopathic bacteria was determined by selective and non-selective culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification. Presence of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus was determined by a nested-PCR detection method. Therapy included scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, and systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole therapy (250 mg of each/3 times daily/10 days) which, based on follow-up microbiological testing, was repeated after 4 months. Supportive periodontal therapy took place at 2 visits during a 16-month period. RESULTS: At baseline, 10 of 22 available teeth demonstrated severe periodontal breakdown. At 16 months, probing and radiographic measurements revealed no teeth with additional attachment loss, and several teeth exhibited significant reduction in gingivitis and pocket depth, increase in radiographic alveolar bone height and clinical attachment level, and radiographic evidence of crestal lamina dura. Baseline subgingival microbiota included actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3.4% of total isolates), prevotella nigrescens (16.4%), Fusobacteriumnucleatum (14.3%) and peptostreptococcus micros (10.6%), as well as cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus. At termination of the study, culture and PCR examinations showed absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. micros and herpesviruses, and P. nigrescens and F.nucleatum each comprised less than 0.1 % of subgingival isolates. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that controlling the periodontopathic microbiota by appropriate antibiotic and conventional periodontal therapy can arrest Papillon-Lefevre syndrome periodontitis.
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2/6. Microbiological, immunological and genetic factors in family members with periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic disease, associated with hematological disorders.

    The microflora, immunological profiles of host defence functions, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) findings are reported for a mother, son and daughter who were diagnosed as having 'periodontitis as a manifestation of systemic diseases, associated with hematological disorders'. Examinations were made of the bacterial flora from the periodontal pocket, neutrophil chemotaxis, neutrophil phagocytosis, and the genotypes (DQB1) and serotypes (DR locus) of HLA class II antigens. Phenotypic analyses of the peripheral lymphocytes were also conducted. The subgingival microflora from the mother was dominated by Gram-negative rods, especially porphyromonas endodontalis, prevotella intermedia/prevotella nigrescens and fusobacterium nucleatum. Subgingival microflora samples from the son and daughter were dominated by gram-positive cocci and gram-positive rods. Through the use of polymerase chain reaction, campylobacter rectus and capnocytophaga gingivalis were detected in all subjects, whereas porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, and treponema denticola were not detected in any subjects. All three subjects showed a remarkable level of depressed neutrophil chemotaxis to N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, although their phagocyte function levels were normal, in comparison to healthy control subjects. Each subject had the same genotype, HLA-DQB1*0601, while the mother had HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR8, and the son and daughter had HLA-DR2 only. In summary, the members of this family showed a similar predisposition to periodontitis with regard to certain host defence functions. It is suggested that the depressed neutrophil chemotaxis that was identified here could be a significant risk factor for periodontitis in this family.
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3/6. Periodontal therapy in siblings with Papillon-Lefevre syndrome and tinea capitis: a report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVE: Report of clinical and microbiological periodontal findings before and 6 months after treatment of two siblings with Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) and tinea capitis. methods: Two brothers, RG 3 years and NG 5 years of age, were referred for treatment due to premature mobility of their deciduous teeth. Probing depths (PPD), attachment levels (PAL-V), and furcation involvements were examined clinically. Panoramic radiographs were taken. Subgingival plaque samples within the deepest pocket of each tooth were taken and analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (AA), porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, treponema denticola, fusobacterium nucleatum, and prevotella intermedia. One-stage full-mouth scaling and extraction of hopeless teeth were performed under general anaesthesia, followed by systemic amoxicillin and metronidazole for 7 days. Clinical and microbiological analyses were performed 6 months after treatment. RESULTS: Before treatment, both siblings had exhibited PPD of up to 13 mm, Class III furcation defects at four teeth, and marginal suppuration. AA was detected in both patients and at all teeth at levels ranging from 3.0 x 10(2) to 5.1 x 10(6). Both patients exhibited palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis. Seven teeth were extracted from RG, and nine from NG. Six months after treatment, PPD had been reduced to patients can be treated successfully. Suppression of AA to below detection level seems to be of high significance.
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4/6. Refractory periodontitis: mixed infection with bacteroides gingivalis and other unusual bacteroides species. A case report.

    Host immune response and the predominant subgingival microflora were evaluated in a 47-year-old male exhibiting severe, recurrent periodontitis. The patient's neutrophils were chemotactically elevated but other functions were within normal limits. Significantly, bacteroides gingivalis and bacteroides zoogleoformans constituted 80% of the cultivable microflora and total cell count in subgingival plaque. The remainder of the cultivable microbiota was comprised of fusobacterium nucleatum and Haemophillis aprophillis. The present study provides additional evidence for an association between B. gingivalis and severe, recurrent periodontal disease.
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5/6. Clinical, microbiological and immunological features associated with the treatment of active periodontosis lesions.

    Clinical, microbiological and immunological factors were examined using data from a subject with periodontosis. The subject was monitored at bimonthly intervals for 26 months at 6 sites per tooth for redness, plaque, suppuration, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and attachment level. Using attachment level measurements and the tolerance method of analysis, sites with active disease and control (inactive) sites of equal pocket depth were selected. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from these sites for predominant cultivable and dark field evaluation before, and 5 and 13 months after treatment by Widman flap surgery and systemic tetracycline. 50 isolates from each of 5 sites monitored before and after treatment were characterized and, if possible, identified. Active sites showed between 2 and 6 mm of attachment loss prior to therapy and "gained" between 2 and 9 mm of attachment after therapy. The control sites "gained" 0 to 1 mm of attachment after therapy. Bleeding on probing was significantly reduced after treatment, whereas plaque accumulation increased significantly in the sampled sites. Similar changes were seen in the remaining sites. The proportions of actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and selenomonas sputigena were elevated in active sites, while proportions of bacteroides intermedius were elevated in control sites. 5 months after treatment, proportions of A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. sputigena and eikenella corrodens were significantly decreased in the previously active sites and proportions of B. intermedius and E. corrodens were significantly decreased in the control sites. 13 months after therapy, the proportions of fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga species had increased. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine models which could "predict" the outcome, attachment level change in the previous monitoring period. The proportions of A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. sputigena, which were associated with destruction, coupled with the proportions of streptococcus sanguis II and Campylobacter concisus which were associated with "gain" could predict prior attachment level change with an r2 of 0.93. Humoral antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans and C. sputigena significantly increased in a period in which multiple actively breaking down sites were detected. Antibody responses to 20 other species tested did not significantly change during the course of monitoring. Crevicular fluid and tissue levels of antibody to A. actinomycetemcomitans were elevated in 5 of 6 active destructive lesions prior to therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
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6/6. Microbiological findings in prepubertal periodontitis. A case report.

    Generalized pre-pubertal periodontitis (GPP) is a rare entity that usually affects children with severe systemic diseases. We report the case of a 7-year-old male patient diagnosed with GPP, with no apparent systemic condition, who lost all his primary teeth to periodontal disease. Before extractions, while he was still in mixed dentition the subgingival plaque was collected and analyzed using dna probes to 40 different microorganisms. Putative periodontopathogens such as prevotella intermedia, selenomonas noxia, fusobacterium nucleatum, and actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans could be identified throughout the mouth. More intriguing was the colonization of the sulcus of some secondary teeth by potentially harmful microorganisms found in pockets of diseased adjacent primary teeth.
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