Cases reported "Periostitis"

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1/7. Bone lesions in chronic granulocytic leukaemia.

    Radiographic abnormalities in bone are unusual during the stable phase of chronic granulocytic leukaemia (CGL). A rare situation is reported in which a patient developed three distinctive skeletal lesions simultaneously in different anatomical sites. Firstly, in both fibulae symmetrical punched out and permeative lesions were present throughout much of the shafts, being most prominent in the mid-diaphyseal regions. Secondly, the tibiae were slightly porotic and showed localized periosteal reactions, whereas in the fibulae there was extensive cloaking by a similar but much more intensive reaction. Thirdly, multiple osteosclerotic lesions were present in the pubic bones and in the proximal ends of the femora and humeri. Concurrently, fluctuant, culture negative swellings were present on the extremities. Histological examination of the material from the subcutaneous and lytic lesions showed only areas of fibrosis with islands of haematopoietic tissue, including scanty megakaryocytes. bone marrow trephine biopsy showed the presence of myelofibrosis with islands of haematopoietic tissue typical of CGL without any evidence of blastic transformation.
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keywords = tibia
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2/7. Ossifying granulomatous periostitis in the course of erythema nodosum.

    The author records a case of ossifying periostitis of the tibia apparently due to erythema nodosum. This does not appear to have been recorded previously. The histology, aetiology and differential diagnosis are discussed. The mechanism is probably one of direct spread from skin to periosteum.
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keywords = tibia
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3/7. Myelofibrosis associated with prominent periosteal bone apposition. Report of two cases.

    Myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative disorder that is characterized by splenomegaly and bone marrow replacement by fibrous tissue. The predominant radiographic feature is osteosclerosis; however, in rare instances, periosteal bone apposition or periostitis is apparent in the metaphysis of the distal femura and proximal tibiae. It has been suggested that periostitis, when associated with fever and bone pain, is indicative of more aggressive disease. We report this unusual radiographic finding and its similar appearance to hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in two patients with myelofibrosis. In our patients, the presence of periosteal bone apposition did not correlate with increased disease aggressiveness.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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4/7. periostitis associated with myelofibrosis.

    Two patients with myelofibrosis developed fever, leg pain and periostitis. The first patient had myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia and was symptomatic for months before x-rays showed periosteal new bone formation in the lower extremities. He subsequently developed periostitis of both upper extremities. radiation of the lower extremities resulted in significant pain relief. The second patient had a past history of polycythemia vera and experienced painful periostitis of the tibiae and fibulae. 99mTechnetium pyrophosphate bone scans showed increased uptake in the involved bones in both patients. Asymptomatic or painful periostitis may be related to the increased bone blood flow associated with myelofibrosis. radiation can afford successful palliation in the severely symptomatic patient.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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5/7. Periosteal ganglion: a report of three new cases including MRI findings and a review of the literature.

    OBJECTIVE. To clarify the clinicopathological features of periosteal ganglion. DESIGN. Three patients with periosteal ganglion were studied clinicopathologically. patients. One patient was selected from the files of our institute and two from a consultation file. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. All three lesions were located over the medial aspect of the tibia. Plain radiographs showed cortical erosions of varying degrees and mild periosteal reaction of the medial side of the tibia. MR images demonstrated well-circumscribed lesions overlying the cortical bone of the tibia, shown as low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images. On T2-weighted images, lesions were homogeneous, lobulated, and showed a characteristic markedly increased signal intensity. These findings are helpful in making a diagnosis of periosteal ganglion. Each patient had an uneventful clinical course after an excision involving the wall of the ganglion, the adjoining periosteum, and the underlying sclerotic cortical bone.
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ranking = 3
keywords = tibia
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6/7. The soleal line: a cause of tibial pseudoperiostitis.

    An unusually prominent soleal line (a normal anatomic variant) may mimic periosteal reaction along the posterior margin of the proximal tibial shaft. This area of pseudoperiostitis is differentiated from hyperostoses arising from the anterior tibial tubercle and the interosseous membrane. It is always associated with normal, undisturbed architecture of the underlying bone.
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ranking = 6
keywords = tibia
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7/7. Radiographic findings in early acquired syphilis: case report and cirtical review.

    The radiographic and pathophysiologic features of early acquired syphilis are discussed. Bone changes occur in early acquired syphilis and should not be confused with gummas of late syphilis. The radiographic findings are protean and may exist without a clinical history of a cutaneous lesion. The skull, clavicle, and tibia are the sites most frequently involved.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tibia
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