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1/1059. Combined peripheral facial and abducens nerve palsy caused by caudal tegmental pontine infarction.

    Isolated peripheral facial and abducens nerve palsy could theoretically be caused by a caudal pontine infarction, but as far as we know, there has been no published case history which has demonstrated this point. We describe the cases of two hypertensive patients who showed combined peripheral facial and abducens nerve palsy without other neurologic symptoms or signs. Other than hypertension, there was no identifiable etiology. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compatible isolated ipsilateral ischemic infarction of the caudal tegmental pons. The present cases indicate that a well-placed small pontine infarction can cause isolated peripheral facial and abducens nerve palsy.
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2/1059. Statins and peripheral neuropathy.

    Within the past 3 years seven cases of reversible peripheral neuropathy apparently caused by statins have been reported. Here we report seven additional cases associated with long-term statin therapy, in which other causes of neuropathy were thoroughly excluded. The neuropathy was in all cases axonal and with affection of both thick and thin nerve fibers. The symptoms of neuropathy persisted during an observation period lasting from 10 weeks to 1 year in four cases after statin treatment had been withdrawn. We suggest that long-term statin treatment may be associated with chronic peripheral neuropathy.
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3/1059. Vasculitis confined to the peripheral nerve and skin: a variant of non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy.

    We describe a patient presenting with vasculitic neuropathy associated with cutaneous vasculitis in the absence of other clinical or laboratory evidence of the underlying systemic vasculitis, and showing a favourable prognosis. Although the early proposed criteria for the diagnosis of non-systemic vasculitic neuropathy (NSVN) exclude the involvement of extraneural tissues, the condition observed in our patient might represent a variant of NSVN, with the vasculitis confined to the small vessels in both the peripheral nerve and the skin.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
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4/1059. peroneal nerve palsy caused by intraneural ganglion.

    A case of peroneal nerve palsy caused by an intraneural ganglion is presented. The cystic mass was located posterolateral to the lateral femoral condyle and extended along the common peroneal nerve distal to the origin of the peroneus longus muscle. The nerve was compressed in the narrow fibro-osseous tunnel against the fibula neck and the tight origin of the peroneus longus muscle. The nerve was decompressed by complete tumor excision and transection of the origin of the peroneus longus muscle. Full recovery of nerve function was obtained in 6 months.
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ranking = 1.2857142857143
keywords = nerve
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5/1059. Chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, responsive to immunoglobulins.

    The association of central and peripheral demyelination was reported previously. Most of the cases refer to central chronic relapsing demyelination with clinical criteria for multiple sclerosis associated with later signs of peripheral nerve involvement. Other authors, described central lesions in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and in guillain-barre syndrome, as a seldom occurrence. We report a patient in which a chronic steadily progressive central and peripheral predominantly motor nervous system demyelination, involving the cranial nerves, was identified. The patient improved after intravenous immunoglobulin suggesting an immune-mediated mechanism. To our knowledge this presentation was not described before.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = nerve
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6/1059. sciatic nerve injury associated with fracture of the femoral shaft.

    The sciatic nerve escapes injury in most fractures of the femoral shaft. We report a case of sciatic nerve palsy associated with a fracture at the distal shaft of the femur. The common peroneal division of the sciatic nerve was lacerated by a bone fragment at the fracture site. Despite the delay in treatment, a satisfactory result was obtained.
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7/1059. Severance of the radial nerve complicating transverse fracture of the mid-shaft of the humerus.

    A case of radial nerve injury associated with a transverse fracture of the middle third of the humerus is reported. The radial nerve was found to be completely severed at the fracture site. Early exploration of the nerve and internal fixation of the fracture gave a satisfactory result.
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8/1059. endometriosis in the presacral nerve.

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a case of extremely aggressive endometriosis involving a 32-year-old woman. methods: Different types of medication were used and various surgical procedures applied in order to reduce the clinical signs and symptoms. Among the surgical procedures employed was presacral neurectomy when endometriosis was identified in the presacral nerve. RESULTS: Receptor determination in the surgical piece was negative. CONCLUSIONS: The etiopathogenic and therapeutic aspects of this process are discussed.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = nerve
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9/1059. hyperalgesia with reduced laser evoked potentials in neuropathic pain.

    Nociceptive evoked potentials to laser stimuli (LEPs) are able to detect lesions of pain and temperature pathways at peripheral, spinal and supraspinal levels. It is commonly accepted that LEP attenuation correlates with the loss of pain and temperature sensations, while pathological heat-pain hypersensitivity has been associated with increased LEP amplitude. Here we present two patients in whom increased pain sensation (hyperalgesia) to laser stimuli was, on the contrary, associated to delayed, desynchronized and attenuated LEPs. Both patients experienced increased unpleasantness and affective reactions to laser, associated to poor ability to localize the stimulus. In both cases the results may be explained by an overactivation of the 'medial pain system', in one patient due to deafferentation of cortical sensory areas by a capsular lesion, and in the other to imbalance between A-delta and C fiber excitation due to peripheral nerve injury. Our results suggest that LEPs, as currently recorded, reflect the activity of a 'lateral' pain system subserved by rapidly conducting fibers. They may therefore, assess the sensory and cognitive dimensions of pain, but may not index adequately the affective-emotional aspects of pain sensation conveyed by the 'medial' pain system. The dissociation between pain sensation and cortical EPs deserve to be added to the current semiology of LEPs, as the presence of abnormal pain to laser on the background of reduced LEPs substantiates the neuropathic nature of the pain.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = nerve
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10/1059. The longer term effect of pulsed radiofrequency for neuropathic pain.

    pulse radiofrequency has been recently described as a technique to apply a relatively high voltage near a nerve but without the usual effects of a rise in temperature or subsequent nerve injury. In this set of case reports, the effect of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is described in patients with neuropathic pain syndromes which have been poorly controlled with other oral and invasive treatments. Whilst anecdotal, the results have been remarkable and should encourage further research into this technique. Observations from the basic science tend to support the concept that PRF may induce some sort of long-term depression in the spinal cord.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = nerve
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