Cases reported "Peritoneal Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/68. Peritoneal abscess formation as a late complication of gallstones spilled during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    The case is described of a 74-year-old woman who presented with an abdominal abscess 1.5 years after laparascopic cholecystectomy. CT and ultrasound showed the presence of gallstones within the abscess. Spillage of gallstones from perforation of the gallbladder is a well recognized complication of laparascopic cholecystectomy, although subsequent abscess formation is unusual especially after a long delay as in this case.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/68. Cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema.

    We report a case of delayed cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema caused by gallstone spillage at the time of laparoscopic cholecystecomy. An occult subphrenic abscess developed, and the patient became symptomatic only after trans-diaphragmatic penetration occurred. This resulted in expectoration of bile, gallstones, and pus. Spontaneous decompression of the empyema occurred because of a peritoneo-pleuro-bronchial fistula. This is the first case of such managed nonoperatively and provides support for the importance of intraoperative retrieval of spilled gallstones at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/68. Bronchoperitoneal fistula secondary to chronic klebsiella pneumoniae subphrenic abscess.

    We treated a case of bronchoperitoneal fistula secondary to a klebsiella pneumoniae subphrenic abscess. This fistulous communication and the surgical procedure used to treat it are described.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/68. Laparoscopic excision of an omental cyst.

    An omental cyst is a rare intra-abdominal tumor. The authors describe a case of omental cyst that was diagnosed correctly with abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and successfully resected completely by use of minimal-access surgical techniques. A sagittal or coronal MRI view may precisely reveal the tumor position. The authors consider MRI to be very useful in the diagnosis of abdominal cystic masses. Laparoscopic surgical techniques are replacing or complementing open abdominal surgical procedures.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.31154458469381
keywords = intra-abdominal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/68. Complications of "dropped" gallstones after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: technical considerations and imaging findings.

    New laparoscopic techniques have revolutionized the practice of surgery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become one of the most commonly performed surgeries worldwide. Although shorter hospital stays and patient comfort have offered clear advantages over open cholecystectomy, the technique has resulted in several specific complications, including bile duct injury and gallbladder perforation. Although rarely clinically significant, intraperitoneal gallstone spillage can cause abscess formation and adhesions. Although these patients can present with a confusing clinical picture, their characteristic radiologic features should be recognized. We present two cases of complicated intraperitoneal gallstone spillage radiologically diagnosed and treated with laparoscopic and interventional radiologic techniques.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/68. Sonographic diagnosis of a small fistulous communication between a subphrenic abscess and a perforated duodenal ulcer.

    We report a case of a fistula between a subphrenic abscess and a perforated duodenal ulcer diagnosed by sonography and confirmed by CT. The sonographic findings included a subphrenic fluid collection connected to the anterior aspect of the superior duodenum by a nonpulsatile, anechoic tubular lesion. Manual compression of the upper epigastrium resulted in movement of echogenic debris from the antrum and superior duodenum through the fistulous tract into the abscess.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/68. endometriosis of the abdominal wall.

    endometriosis is ectopic endometrial tissue that responds to hormonal stimulation and is found 8-15 per cent of all menstruating women. Endometrioma in/or close to a surgical scar is rare and occurs in 0.1 per cent of women who underwent cesarean section. When localized at the abdominal wall, the disease presents as a painful swelling resembling other lesions, such as hernias, post-operative ventral hernias, hematomas, granulomas, abscesses, and tumors. endometriosis of the abdominal wall may not be considered in the differential diagnosis of masses detected in/or close cesarean scar. Three cases are reported here. All of them underwent surgery and the error of the pre-operative diagnosis was revealed by histology in two cases. Actually, only one case was suspected pre-operatively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/68. Laparoscopic resection of an omental cyst with pedicle torsion.

    Omental cysts are the least-common variety of all types of intra-abdominal cystic lesions. In the past, transabdominal laparotomy with excision of the cyst was the treatment of choice. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, it has become possible to resect the cyst without the need for a large incision in the abdomen. We report a case of a 15-year-old girl who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for recurring abdominal pain of 2 years' duration. The procedure revealed a huge cyst lying above the omentum with its pedicle rising from the greater curvature of the stomach. The pedicle was noted to have twisted eight times in a clockwise direction. The cyst was resected by laparoscopic means using three trocars. The postoperative course was uneventful. As presented in this case, we believe that a laparoscopic approach is an attractive alternative for the management of omental cystic lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.31154458469381
keywords = intra-abdominal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/68. Laparoscopic surgery in infants with intra-abdominal cysts: two case reports.

    OBJECTIVES: We report two cases of infants found to have congenital omental cystic lesion with torsion and ovarian cyst treated by laparoscopy-assisted surgery (LAS). methods: A laparoscope was inserted by an open method. The intra-abdominal pressure was maintained at 8 mm Hg. We diagnosed the cystic lesions with torsion. At aspirator was used to aspirate the cystic content and remove the cyst. RESULTS: No intra- or postoperative complications were encountered. Oral intake was commenced on postoperative day 2 in both patients. The cosmetic results following LAS were excellent. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that LAS is suitable for the management of omental cystic lesions with torsion and ovarian cyst in nursing infants. An aspirator is useful in preventing spillage of cystic contents in patients with intra-abdominal cystic lesion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.8692675081629
keywords = intra-abdominal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/68. Intraperitoneal abscess after an undetected spilled stone.

    gallbladder perforation with loss of calculi in the abdomen is frequent during laparoscopic cholecystectomy and can cause serious late complications. We report on a 65-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallbladder empyema, during which a stone spilled into the peritoneal cavity. The spilled gallstone was not noticed during the initial operation. Three months later, she reported left upper quadrant pain of recent onset without associated symptoms such as fever, nausea, or weight loss. On examination, a palpable 2-cm tender subcutaneous mass was found. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated an incarcerated hernia, and computed tomography (CT) scan showed an intraperitoneal abscess located in the back of the anterior abdominal wall in the left upper quadrant, which contained a recalcification figure. The patient was brought to surgery, at which time an incision was made over the mass. A chronic abscess in the back of the abdominal wall, also spreading into the subfascial space, was drained, and purulent material was obtained with a large stone, 2.8 cm in diameter, which had become lodged in the rectus abdominis after an undetected stone spillage during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient continued receiving antibiotic treatment for 7 days, recovered well, and was discharged 7 days after drainage of the abscess.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Peritoneal Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.