Cases reported "Peritoneal Diseases"

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1/97. Fatal polyarteritis nodosa with massive mesenteric necrosis in a child.

    polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a rare vasculitic syndrome in childhood. There are few reported cases of ischaemic necrosis of the intestine and even fewer survivors in adults. We report the case of a 10-year-old boy with PAN and an acute abdomen that required operative intervention. Evidence was found of mesenteric arteritis with large ischaemic segments resulting in infarction and perforation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/97. Transmesenteric hernia after laparoscopic-assisted sigmoid colectomy.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Laparoscopic-assisted surgery has been applied for a variety of colonic surgery. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate a possible and avoidable complication of laparoscopic colonic surgery. CASE PRESENTATION: A 47-year-old woman underwent gasless laparoscopic-assisted sigmoid colectomy. On the 20th postoperative day, she developed bowel obstruction. decompression with a long tube failed to resolve the bowel obstruction. Open laparotomy was performed. Abdominal exploration revealed a loop of the small bowel incarcerated in the mesenteric defect caused by the previous operation. Adhesiolysis was performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION: Despite technical difficulty, complete closure of the mesentery after bowel resection is strongly recommended for prevention of transmesenteric incarcerated hernia after laparoscopic surgery.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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3/97. Preoperative sonographic diagnosis of midgut malrotation with volvulus in adults: the "whirlpool" sign.

    Midgut malrotation and volvulus, found mostly in children, are rare and difficult to diagnose preoperatively in adults. We report 2 cases in which a 68-year-old man and a 75-year-old woman presented with intermittent cramping abdominal pain, abdominal distention, and vomiting. Abdominal sonography demonstrated wrapping of the superior mesenteric vein and bowel loops around the superior mesenteric artery (the "whirlpool sign") in both patients. Abdominal CT revealed similar findings. The diagnoses of midgut volvulus and mesenteric malrotation were made, and the patients underwent laparotomy. The man was confirmed to have duodenojejunal malrotation and volvulus, and the woman had cecal volvulus. The whirlpool sign is valuable for the preoperative diagnosis of mesenteric vessel malrotation and midgut volvulus.
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ranking = 6
keywords = operative
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4/97. Cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema.

    We report a case of delayed cholelithoptysis and pleural empyema caused by gallstone spillage at the time of laparoscopic cholecystecomy. An occult subphrenic abscess developed, and the patient became symptomatic only after trans-diaphragmatic penetration occurred. This resulted in expectoration of bile, gallstones, and pus. Spontaneous decompression of the empyema occurred because of a peritoneo-pleuro-bronchial fistula. This is the first case of such managed nonoperatively and provides support for the importance of intraoperative retrieval of spilled gallstones at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/97. Management of a patient with hepatic-thoracic-pelvic and omental hydatid cysts and post-operative bilio-cutaneous fistula: a case report.

    In humans, most hydatid cysts occur in the liver and 75% of these are single. Our patient was a 31 year-old male. His magnetic resonance imaging (MR) showed one cyst (15 x 20 cm) in the right lobe and three cysts (5 x 6 cm, 8 x 6 cm, and 5 x 5 cm) in the left lobe of the liver, two cysts (4 x 5 cm and 5 x 5 cm) on the greater omentum, and two cysts (15 x 10 and 10 x 10 cm) in the pelvis. The abdomen was entered first by a bilateral subcostal incision and then by a Phennenstiel incision. Partial cystectomy capitonnage was done on the liver cysts; the cysts on the omentum were excised, and the pelvic cysts were enucleated. The cyst in the right lobe of the liver was in communication with a thoracic cyst. An air leak developed from the thoracic cyst which had underwater drainage and bile drainage from the drain in the cavity of the right lobe cyst. Sphincterotomy was done on the seventh post-operative day by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). No significant effect on mean bile output from the fistula occurred. octreotide therapy was initiated, but due to abdominal pain and gas bloating the patient felt and could not tolerate, it was stopped on the fourth day; besides, it had no decreasing effect on bile output during the 4 days. Because air and bile leak continued and he had bile stained sputum, he was operated on on post-operative day 18. By right thoracotomy, the cavity and the leaking branches were closed. By right subcostal incision, cholecystectomy and T-tube drainage of the choledochus were done. On post-operative day 30, he was sent home with the T-tube and the drain in the cavity. After 3 months post-operatively, a second T-tube cholangiography was done, and a narrowing in the distal right hepatic duct and a minimal narrowing in the distal left hepatic duct were exposed. Balloon dilatation was done by way of a T-tube. bile drainage ceased. There was no collection in the cavity in follow-up CT scanning, so the drain in the cavity, and the drainage catheter in the right hepatic duct were extracted. Evaluation of the biliary ductal system is important in bilio-cutaneous fistulas, and balloon dilatation is very effective in fistulas due to narrowing of the ducts.
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ranking = 8
keywords = operative
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6/97. Massive intraperitoneal bleeding from tryptic erosions of the splenic vein. Another cause of sudden deterioration during recovery from acute pancreatitis.

    Acute bleeding is a rare, but frequently fatal complication of pancreatitis. Bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract may occur owing to gastric or duodenal erosions, peptic ulcers, or varices in the esophagus, stomach, or colon following splenic vein thrombosis, or intraperitoneally from eroded vessels in pancreatic pseudocysts or expanding pseudoaneurysms. We report a novel case of massive intraperitoneal bleeding owing to tryptic erosions of the splenic vein in a patient recovering from acute pancreatitis. diagnosis of the bleeding was made by ultrasound and ultrasound-guided blood aspiration. The source of the bleeding was identified intraoperatively, and a left-sided pancreatectomy and a splenectomy were performed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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7/97. Internal hernias and gastric perforation after a laparoscopic gastric bypass.

    A 27-year-old woman underwent laparoscopic Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. A retrocolic-retrogastric herniation of most of the small bowel and later a gastric perforation due to internal hernia at the mesenteric defect of the jejuno-jejunostomy occurred. These unusual, but not rare, complications are directly related to the neoanatomy that follows gastric bypass and can lead to rapidly progressing and life-threatening situations. Proper evaluation of clinical signs and symptoms, early abdominal CT scan, and urgent operative intervention are mandatory to achieve a successful outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/97. Successful surgical treatment for spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma in polycythemia vera: report of a case.

    Bleeding is a common complication of such myeloproliferative disorders as polycythemia vera, and it usually occurs in either the skin or mucosa. We experienced a case of a massive retroperitoneal hematoma with no history of trauma in association with polycythemia vera. A 68-year-old man was referred to our hospital as a case of acute abdomen, and was diagnosed as having a retroperitoneal hematoma and polycythemia vera based on radiological and hematological examinations. Because the mass effect of the hematoma caused a progressive deterioration of his respiratory condition, surgical drainage was necessitated and successfully undertaken. Although conservative treatment is reportedly sufficient and uncontrollable intraoperative bleeding may occur, especially in cases of myeloproliferative disorders, our experience suggests that an operation may nevertheless be occasionally advisable for this rare condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/97. endometriosis of the abdominal wall.

    endometriosis is ectopic endometrial tissue that responds to hormonal stimulation and is found 8-15 per cent of all menstruating women. Endometrioma in/or close to a surgical scar is rare and occurs in 0.1 per cent of women who underwent cesarean section. When localized at the abdominal wall, the disease presents as a painful swelling resembling other lesions, such as hernias, post-operative ventral hernias, hematomas, granulomas, abscesses, and tumors. endometriosis of the abdominal wall may not be considered in the differential diagnosis of masses detected in/or close cesarean scar. Three cases are reported here. All of them underwent surgery and the error of the pre-operative diagnosis was revealed by histology in two cases. Actually, only one case was suspected pre-operatively.
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ranking = 3
keywords = operative
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10/97. Laparoscopic resection of an omental cyst with pedicle torsion.

    Omental cysts are the least-common variety of all types of intra-abdominal cystic lesions. In the past, transabdominal laparotomy with excision of the cyst was the treatment of choice. With the advent of laparoscopic surgery, it has become possible to resect the cyst without the need for a large incision in the abdomen. We report a case of a 15-year-old girl who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for recurring abdominal pain of 2 years' duration. The procedure revealed a huge cyst lying above the omentum with its pedicle rising from the greater curvature of the stomach. The pedicle was noted to have twisted eight times in a clockwise direction. The cyst was resected by laparoscopic means using three trocars. The postoperative course was uneventful. As presented in this case, we believe that a laparoscopic approach is an attractive alternative for the management of omental cystic lesions.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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