Cases reported "Peritonsillar Abscess"

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11/72. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma presenting as a peritonsillar abscess.

    A rhabdomyosarcoma of the head and neck region is a rare childhood neoplasm often presenting with vague symptoms that can easily mimic other diseases. We present an unusual case of an alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate in a three-year-old child, that presented as a peritonsillar abscess.
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12/72. Necrotizing fasciitis secondary to peritonsillar abscess: a new case and review of eight earlier cases.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal soft-tissue infection that occurs only rarely in the head and neck region. Broad-spectrum parenteral antibiotics and surgical debridement are the mainstays of treatment. Until now, only eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis secondary to peritonsillar abscess have been described in the English-language literature. In this article, we report a new case that occurred in an otherwise healthy 43-year-old woman. In addition to standard treatment, the patient underwent a hot tonsillectomy. After 23 months of follow-up, she is in good health.
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13/72. Diagnostic dilemma in coinfection.

    A Fifteen years girl belonging to a low socioeconomic status was admitted with peritonsillar abscess caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), high fever, diarrhoea and septicaemic shock. Initial blood cultures and widal test, stool cultures and routine stool examination were non-contributory to the diagnosis. A bone marrow culture in the second week confirmed the diagnosis of salmonella typhi infection. Examination of a fresh stool sample showed cysts of entamoeba histolytica. She was treated with ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, augmentin and ceftriaxone. She had no clinical evidence of immunosuppression prior to this episode and her hiv test was negative. This case report highlights the presence of community acquired MRSA infection causing perititonsillar abscess, and the diagnostic dilemma of fever and diarrhoea due to coinfection with salmonella typhi and Entamobea histolytica.
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14/72. Internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm masquerading as a peritonsillar abscess.

    Blunt carotid arterial injuries are uncommon. Motor vehicle crashes are the most frequent cause, but this type of vascular injury can be secondary to any direct blow to the neck, intraoral trauma, or strangulation. Types of vascular injuries include dissection, pseudoaneurysm, thrombosis, rupture, and arteriovenous fistula formation. patients with pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery will usually present with neurologic complaints, ranging from the minor to complete stroke. On physical examination, neck hematoma, bruits, pulsatile neck mass, or a palpable thrill may be found. However, in 50% of cases, no external signs of neck trauma are observed. Onset of symptoms may occur within a few hours to several months after the initial injury. angiography is considered the gold standard for diagnosis, but carotid Doppler ultrasound recently has been shown to be very sensitive in detecting these types of injuries. Treatment of pseudoaneurysm is often surgical, with endovascular stenting.
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15/72. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis: sources and outcomes.

    BACKGROUND: Abscesses of the peritonsillar region are among the most common deep abscesses of the head and neck. However, cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) associated with a peritonsillar abscess is an extremely rare condition, with only 12 well-documented cases described. patients: We reviewed and compared all 12 cases of CNF arising from peritonsillar abscesses, including our own case. CNF that developed after peritonsillar abscesses was also compared with that developing predominantly after odontogenic infection. RESULTS: The overall mortality was higher in the group with peritonsillar abscesses (33% vs 25%). CONCLUSION: It is probable that of all cases of CNF, that arising from peritonsillar abscess has the worst prognosis.
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16/72. Ultrasound-guided drainage of peritonsillar abscess by the emergency physician.

    The diagnosis of peritonsillar abscess (PTA) poses a challenge to emergency physicians (EPs). The decision to perform an invasive procedure with potential complications is based on clinical judgment that is often inaccurate. Although there is some mention of intraoral ultrasound in otolaryngology practice, there is none in the emergency medicine (EM) literature. However, this bedside emergency application of ultrasonography has the potential to be of considerable use in EM practice, and could allow EPs who previously deferred blind needle aspiration of a potential abscess to perform the procedure themselves. We report the cases of 6 patients who presented with probable PTA and were evaluated with intraoral ultrasound at the bedside by an EP. All 6 patients then underwent needle aspiration. As diagnosed on ultrasound, 3 of the patients had negative aspirations and were diagnosed with peritonsillar cellulitis. Three others were found to have PTA, with 2 requiring real-time ultrasound needle guidance to accomplish abscess drainage after multiple failures with the blind approach.
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17/72. Intrathoracic infections with bacteraemia due to eikenella corrodens as a complication of peritonsillar abscesses: report of a case and review of the literature.

    A 52-year-old man, without previous disease, presented with dysphagia, dyspnoea, high fever and sore throat after peritonsillar abscesses drainage. Physical and complementary examinations were consistent with pericarditis, mediastinitis, pneumonia and pleuritis. blood cultures grew eikenella corrodens resistant to clindamycin and amikacin. We emphasize the pathogenic potential of eikenella corrodens. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this organism as a pathogen in intrathoracic infections after peritonsillar abscesses drainage.
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18/72. Acute peritonsillar abscess caused by arcanobacterium haemolyticum.

    A patient is reported with a peritonsillar abscess yielding arcanobacterium haemolyticum. This appears to be only the fifth such case described in the medical literature and the first from europe. The organism has been reported as an occasional cause of tonsillopharyngitis with rash, resembling infection with streptococcus pyogenes but often unresponsive to penicillin therapy. A. haemolyticum easily passes unrecognized in bacteriological cultures as a result of its slow growth, coryneform appearance in the Gram's stain and weak haemolytic activity on conventional laboratory media.
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19/72. Parapharyngeal abscess: diagnosis, complications and management in adults.

    Parapharyngeal abscess may cause life-threatening complications. peritonsillar abscess and tonsillitis may result in parapharyngeal abscess. Since the introduction of antibiotics, the incidence of parapharyngeal abscess secondary to tonsillitis and peritonsillar abscess has decreased dramatically. We present five cases of parapharyngeal abscess resulting from tonsillitis and peritonsillar infection extending to the parapharyngeal space in adult patients. Two were complicated by mediastinitis despite early treatment by wide spectrum antibiotics. We believe that early diagnosis and aggressive antibiotic treatment with early surgical drainage in cases associated with pus collection are the key points in preventing serious and fatal complications. We emphasize the diagnostic role of computerized tomography (CT) scan and the importance of early and proper drainage of these abscesses.
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20/72. Corticosteroids and peritonsillar abscess formation in infectious mononucleosis.

    peritonsillar abscess formation is an uncommon complication of infectious mononucleosis (IM). Early case reports implicated corticosteroids in the development of such abscesses, however, subsequent studies suggested that these drugs do not promote the formation of abscesses at several sites outside the central nervous system. It has recently been demonstrated that zwitterionic polysaccharides, in bacterial capsules, form complexes with CD4( ) T lymphocytes leading to abscess formation. A patient is presented who developed peritonsillar abscess a few days after initiation of corticosteroid therapy for IM; the medical literature was reviewed in respect of this subject. It appears that the occurrence of these abscesses in IM is not strongly linked to corticosteroid treatment. The authors, therefore, recommend that steroids should not be withheld from patients with severe IM on the basis that they may precipitate the development of peritonsillar abscess.
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