Cases reported "Peritonsillar Abscess"

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11/33. Infection of the neck spaces: a present day complication.

    Although advances in antibiotic therapy have made adult neck space infections an uncommon event, it is essential to bear them in mind when treating oro-dental and oro-pharyngeal sepsis, as they can often progress with life threatening sequelae. Three cases of neck space infection as a consequence of dental infection, pharyngitis and peritonsillar abscess are presented. The management of a potentially compromised airway is of paramount importance in the immediate treatment of neck space sepsis.
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12/33. Neglected peritonsillar abscess resulting in necrotizing soft tissue infection of the neck and chest wall.

    Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI) of the neck and chest wall resulting from neglected peritonsillar abscess is a relatively rare but highly lethal surgical condition which has received little attention in the literature. The case of a 54-year-old male patient affected by this unusual infection is reported. Our recent experience and literature data suggest that NSTI resulting from peritonsillar abscess is rapidly spreading and life threatening. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis, broad-spectrum antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement are essential to its successful treatment.
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13/33. Innovative airway management for peritonsillar abscess.

    PURPOSE: To describe innovative airway management in an adult with a peritonsillar abscess (quinsy) located atypically in the inferior pole of the palatine tonsil. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 25-yr-old male was admitted for surgical drainage of a left-sided, inferior pole peritonsillar abscess. Previous attempts at intraoral needle and scalpel drainage with topical anesthesia in the emergency department had failed. He had an interdental distance of 1.5 cm and computed tomography imaging showed narrowing of the airway diameter to 8 mm and lateral displacement of the epiglottis. He gargled 10 mL 0.5% lidocaine in the sitting position. We advanced a 3.1-mm pediatric fibreoptic bronchoscope (FOB) through an orally inserted nasopharyngeal airway to identify the glottis and sprayed 0.5% lidocaine onto the airway mucosa. We replaced the airway with a reinforced 6.5-mm internal diameter tracheal tube (TT), advanced the FOB through it until its tip was just above the carina, and then advanced the TT into the trachea. After iv induction of general anesthesia, the surgeon performed a tonsillectomy and drained the neck abscess. Postoperative direct laryngoscopy revealed a markedly improved airway lumen and tracheal extubation over a Cook Airway Exchange Catheter was uneventful. The patient was stable in the recovery room, and was discharged on the third postoperative day. CONCLUSION: We present an innovative technique of fibreoptic intubation in an awake patient with an inferior pole peritonsillar abscess.
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keywords = neck
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14/33. Occult carotid pseudoaneurysm following streptococcal throat infection.

    Pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery (PAICA) is a rare complication of neck space infection. An 8-year-old girl presented with odynophagia (painful swallowing), trismus and left peritonsillar swelling. Abscess was suspected, but aspiration was dry. The PAICA was diagnosed on computed tomography. The aneurysm and involved left internal carotid artery were occluded endovascularly. She has made an uneventful recovery.
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keywords = neck
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15/33. peritonsillar abscess in a 40-day-old infant.

    A peritonsillar abscess is one of the most commonly occurring deep space infections of the head and neck in adults and children. A peritonsillar abscess that appears in newborns, however, is extremely rare. The treatment of a peritonsillar abscess requires both the selection of appropriate antibiotics and the best procedure to remove the abscessed material. We report a case of a peritonsillar abscess in a 40-day-old infant who was treated with antibiotic therapy alone.
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keywords = neck
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16/33. Bilateral peritonsillar abscesses: case report and literature review.

    Although unilateral peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) are a common complication of acute bacterial tonsillitis, bilateral PTA are quite rare. We present the case of a 14-year-old female teenager with a 1-week history of acute tonsillitis. physical examination revealed significant trismus, symmetrically inflamed tonsils and soft palate, and a midline uvula. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the neck demonstrated bilateral PTA. After bilateral needle aspiration and administration of antibiotics, complete disease resolution was rapidly achieved. patients with bilateral PTA present a diagnostic dilemma because they do not demonstrate the classic asymmetric signs and symptoms seen in the more prevalent unilateral PTA. Contrast-enhanced CT imaging can help diagnose bilateral PTA and should be considered in the presence of marked trismus but with the absence of unilateral inflammatory findings.
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keywords = neck
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17/33. Vascular complication of neck space infection: case report and literature review.

    Antibiotic therapy has changed the face of medicine radically, and physicians no longer have the empirical knowledge of bacterial infections that they once had. Consequently, the diagnosis and management of complicated infections presents a significant challenge to today's otolaryngologists. We present a rare complication, even before the advent of antibiotics, of a head and neck infection: a carotid artery pseudoaneurysm resulting from peritonsillar abscess. The diagnosis and management of this problem is discussed and the pertinent literature reviewed.
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keywords = neck
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18/33. peritonsillar abscess. Why aggressive management is appropriate.

    peritonsillar abscess is the most common deep neck infection in adults. Infections develop from purulent material collecting in the fascial spaces lateral to the capsule of the palatine tonsil. Infections are usually polymicrobial, and a significant number of anaerobes are isolated. The cornerstone of therapy is drainage of the abscess. With cooperative patients, careful permucosal needle aspiration is an accepted method of primary therapy. Large or recurrent abscesses require otolaryngologic consultation for adequate incision and drainage. tonsillectomy may be necessary to prevent re-formation of abscess in patients with a history of recurrent tonsillitis.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
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19/33. Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis is an inflammation of the longus colli muscle tendon, which is located on the anterior surface of the vertebral column extending from the atlas to the third thoracic vertebra. Five cases of acute retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis seen in the emergency department (ED) over a 15-month period are reported. In addition, a retrospective review of four cases diagnosed as retropharyngeal abscess and admitted to the hospital revealed that two of these cases actually represented retropharyngeal calcific tendinitis. A review of the literature and potential differential diagnoses are presented. For those primary care physicians who must evaluate patients with acute cervical pain, sore throat, or odynophagia, an x-ray study of the neck revealing retropharyngeal calcium deposition should raise the question of the diagnosis of acute retropharyngeal tendinitis. Clinical characteristics of this entity include a painful condition which is treatable and is often mistaken for retropharyngeal abscess, pharyngitis, or peritonsillar abscess. In our opinion, this condition may be more prevalent than the literature suggests.
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keywords = neck
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20/33. peritonsillar abscess with parapharyngeal involvement: incidence and treatment.

    In 2.3% of 217 patients with peritonsillar abscess, the clinical picture was atypical, with inflammatory swelling of the pharyngeal wall below and behind the tonsil, oedema of the epiglottis and a diffuse swelling on the side of the neck. The typical signs of peritonsillar abscess, i.e. trismus, a medially displaced tonsil and displacement of the uvula toward the opposite side, were either completely lacking or less pronounced than usual. The abscesses were all located in the peritonsillar space at the lower pole or behind the tonsil. To ensure rapid, uncomplicated recovery in such cases with parapharyngeal involvement, it is essential that abscess tonsillectomy under antibiotic cover with penicillin is not postponed.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = neck
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