Cases reported "Petrositis"

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1/35. Pyogenic liver abscess as a cause of acute upper abdominal pain. A report of two cases.

    The clinical course of 2 patients with acute abdominal pain, which was eventually found to be due to pyogenic hepatic abscesses is described. One patient, operated on late in the course, died; the other, who was operated on early, recovered. The importance of considering this life-threatening disease in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is emphasized.
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2/35. Pelvic abscess in the second half of pregnancy after oocyte retrieval for in-vitro fertilization: case report.

    We describe a very late manifestation of pelvic abscesses after oocyte retrieval for in-vitro fertilization (IVF). In a twin pregnancy achieved after intracytoplasmic sperm injection, rupture of bilateral ovarian abscesses occurred at the end of the second trimester. An emergency laparotomy was necessary because of an acute abdomen. This complication led to severe maternal and neonatal morbidity, preterm birth and neonatal death. The rare occurrence of acute abdomen in pregnancy due to pelvic infection and the non-specific symptoms of a pelvic abscess after oocyte retrieval for IVF are discussed.
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3/35. Retroperitoneal teratoma presenting as acute abdomen in an elderly person.

    A 56-year-old man presented with acute abdomen. Clinically, he was diagnosed as having perigastric abscess. On exploration, a retroperitoneal cystic teratoma was encountered. Postoperatively, he recovered uneventfully and has no residual disease two years later.
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4/35. Antiretroviral-induced hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis: case report and review of the literature.

    As the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (hiv) infection continues to rise the clinician is encountered with a diagnostic challenge. Nonsurgical diseases such as acute colitis or enteritis can appear similar to such true surgical emergencies as abscess, perforation, or mesenteric ischemia. We report a case of fulminant hepatic failure associated with didanosine and masquerading as a surgical abdomen and compare the clinical, biologic, histologic, and ultrastructural findings with reports described previously. This entity should be kept in mind when evaluating the acute abdomen in the hiv-positive patient.
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5/35. Abdominal problems in patients with spinal cord lesions.

    The physiatrist faces two major difficulties when dealing with abdominal problems in spinal cord-injured patients: (1) realizing when there is a serious problem; and (2) determining the etiology of the problem. patients are presented which demonstrate these difficulties. One patient with a ruptured appendix and the periappendicial abscess had only mild symptoms whereas another patient with severe abdominal pain, rigidity and rebound tenderness had a viral enteritis. The neurologic innervations of the abdomen and the various signs and symptoms appearing in cord-injured patients with abdominal problems are described. A methodical evaluation procedure for acute problems in paraplegic patients is presented.
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keywords = abscess
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6/35. Perforation peritonitis in primary intestinal tuberculosis.

    Primary intestinal tuberculosis is unusual in European and North American countries today. Its diagnosis is often surprising and differentiation from inflammatory bowel diseases is difficult. The authors present a rare case of severe stercoral peritonitis caused by multiple intestinal perforations in a patient with primary ileocecal tuberculosis. Initial clinical and laboratory investigations led to the suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease. The subsequent diagnostic workup included colonoscopic examination of the cecal and terminal region of the ileum with multiple biopsies. After the pathologist had assessed the specimen as indicating Crohn's disease, appropriate therapy was initiated. Several days later, however, the patient was readmitted to a surgical intensive care unit with clinical signs of peritonitis and immediately operated on. The final diagnosis from a resection specimen confirmed the diagnosis of primary intestinal tuberculosis. The follow-up was complicated by a subhepatic abscess formation with the necessity for surgical drainage. The patient's recovery was uneventful, she underwent intensive antituberculotic therapy and is asymptomatic at present. Surgeons caring for patients with acute abdomen should be aware of tuberculous perforation peritonitis even in non-risk groups of patients.
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keywords = abscess
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7/35. Ruptured splenic abscess presenting as pneumoperitoneum.

    Spontaneous pneumoperitoneum follows perforation of hollow viscus; rarely, it may arise from pulmonary interstitial emphysema or intestinal inflammatory disease. We report a 30-year-old man with ruptured splenic abscess who presented with acute abdomen and had pneumoperitoneum. He was treated with splenectomy and is asymptomatic 2 months later.
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8/35. Strangulated internal hernia through the lesser omentum with intestinal necrosis: a case report.

    CONTEXT: Internal hernias account for only 0.2 to 0.9% of the cases of intestinal obstruction. They do not have specific clinical manifestations, and are usually diagnosed during laparotomy for acute intestinal obstruction. Internal hernias through the lesser omentum are extremely rare. CASE REPORT: We report here the case of a 36-year-old patient who underwent exploratory laparotomy for acute intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia through the lesser omentum was found, with a strangulated ileal segment passing through the perforation into an abscess within the lesser sac. The surgical procedures included ileal resection, primary anastomosis, abscess removal, and placement of a drain in the lesser sac. The patient was reoperated 6 days later for abdominal sepsis; a lesser sac abscess was removed and the abdominal incision was left open. The patient stayed in the intensive care Unit for 15 days, and eventually left the hospital on the 28th post-admission day, with complete recovery thereafter. CONCLUSION: The early diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction and immediate indication for laparotomy is the main task of the surgeon when faced with a case of acute abdomen with a hypothesis of internal hernia, so as to minimize severe postoperative complications, as illustrated by the present case.
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keywords = abscess
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9/35. Percutaneous removal of retained calculi from the abdomen.

    With rising pressure placed on health service resources minimally invasive techniques requiring only short hospital admissions are increasing in importance. We describe the techniques used to remove calculi from the peritoneal cavity which had been retained after surgery and continued to cause clinical problems. In both cases described the calculi lay within abscess cavities associated with fistulous tracks to the skin. The fistulae were dilated to allow passage of therapeutic radiologic and endoscopic equipment enabling manipulation and subsequent extraction of the stones. In both cases removal of the calculi allowed complete resolution of the fistulae and the patients made a full clinical recovery. Removal of gallstones which have escaped into the peritoneum at laparoscopic cholecystectomy leading to sepsis has been described; we describe the novel management of a patient in whom extraction had already been attempted, at another hospital, without success. Removal of an appendicolith, described here in another patient, does not appear to have been reported previously.
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keywords = abscess
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10/35. Perisplenitis as a cause of acute abdomen: a case report.

    Splenitis can complicate blood-borne sepsis in hemodialysis patients. Symptoms include left upper quadrant pain and tenderness in addition to generalized systemic manifestation of infection. Clinical diagnosis is difficult and there is no specific investigation to confirm it. Computed tomography scan of the spleen can help in identifying a splenic abscess, rupture, or infarction. A splenectomy is the treatment of choice in splenic abscess, in splenitis to avoid spontaneous rupture, and in recurrent perisplenitis.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = abscess
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