Cases reported "Pharyngeal Diseases"

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1/81. Endovascular occlusion of a carotid pseudoaneurysm complicating deep neck space infection in a child. Case report.

    Pseudoaneurysm formation of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) is a rare, potentially lethal complication of deep neck space infection. This entity typically occurs following otolaryngological or upper respiratory tract infection. The pseudoaneurysm is heralded by a pulsatile neck mass, Homer's syndrome, lower cranial neuropathies, and/or hemorrhage that may be massive. The recommended treatment includes prompt arterial ligation. The authors present a case of pseudoaneurysm of the cervical ICA complicating a deep neck space infection. A parapharyngeal staphylococcus aureus abscess developed in a previously healthy 6-year-old girl after she experienced pharyngitis. The abscess was drained via an intraoral approach. On postoperative Day 3, the patient developed a pulsatile neck mass, lethargy, ipsilateral Horner's syndrome, and hemoptysis, which resulted in hemorrhagic shock. Treatment included emergency endovascular occlusion of the cervical ICA and postembolization antibiotic treatment for 6 weeks. The patient has made an uneventful recovery as of her 18-month follow-up evaluation. Conclusions drawn.from this experience and a review of the literature include the following: 1) mycotic pseudoaneurysms of the carotid arteries have a typical clinical presentation that should enable timely recognition; 2) these lesions occur more commonly in children than in adults; 3) angiography with a view to performing endovascular occlusion should be undertaken promptly; and 4) endovascular occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm is a viable treatment option.
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ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
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2/81. Limitations of imaging for foreign bodies in parapharyngeal abscess and the importance of surgical exploration.

    A rare cause of parapharyngeal abscess in association with a wooden skewer is presented. Despite the use of both ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scanning as diagnostic tools, the foreign body could not be identified. Only through a meticulous exploration of the neck was the foreign body located. The importance of surgical exploration even with negative imaging is discussed.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = abscess
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3/81. Parapharyngeal abscess due to cat-scratch disease.

    The spectrum of illness attributed to cat-scratch disease (CSD) continues to expand. Although a common cause of cervical adenitis in children, CSD has not been associated as a cause of deep fascial space infections of the head and neck. We describe a child with extensive parapharyngeal adenitis and abscesses due to CSD confirmed by histological and serological evaluations.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = abscess
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4/81. Transcervical foreign body.

    The uncommon occurrence of acute retropharyngeal abscess in adults can be the result of a retained foreign body. A large piece of wood impacted in the neck in a road traffic accident and presenting as retropharyngeal and bilateral parapharyngeal abscesses is reported for its rarity and clinical interest.
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ranking = 1
keywords = abscess
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5/81. Acute tonsillitis complicated by retropharyngeal and thyroid abscess infected with de-repressed beta lactamase citrobacter mutans.

    An unusual presentation of acute tonsillitis complicated by retropharyngeal and thyroid abscess is reported. Spontaneous rupture of retropharyngeal abscess resulted in necrotic fistulae between the pharyngeal wall and the retropharyngeal space.
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ranking = 3
keywords = abscess
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6/81. Idiopathic lymphoepithelial cyst of the parapharynx masquerading as peritonsillar abscess.

    We present a case of a 38-year-old man who was referred to us with a right-sided quinsy. However he was found to have a large lympho-epithelial cyst in his right parapharynx mimicking the signs of a quinsy to the unsuspecting eye. We describe this case to illustrate an unusual cause of a swelling of the lateral pharyngeal wall.
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ranking = 2
keywords = abscess
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7/81. Acute suppurative thyroiditis caused by an infected piriform sinus fistula with thyrotoxicosis.

    We report herein an unusual case of thyrotoxicosis caused by acute suppurative thyroiditis (AST) infected through a piriform sinus fistula (PSF). A 28-year-old man presented with pain over the thyroid gland and elevated serum thyroid hormone levels, a picture similar to subacute thyroiditis. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy from the left lobe showed neutrophil infiltration, and culture from the aspirate grew anaerobic peptostreptococcus. A neck computed tomography (CT) scan showed an abscess in the thyroid gland, and barium swallow revealed the presence of PSF. Appropriate antibiotic treatment ameliorated his symptoms of infection, followed by normalization of thyroid function. Three months later, he underwent fistulectomy and partial left lobectomy. The end of the PSF track was found in the left thyroid lobe. Thus infection of the thyroid gland through the infected PSF was likely the cause of supprative thyroiditis. The unusual clinical features of AST in this patient include the presence of severe thyrotoxicosis, relatively late onset (28-years-old) of infection despite the presence of congenital PSF, and the lack of acute inflammatory signs on the overlying skin of the thyroid gland. It is important to recognize this type of AST, since fistulectomy is required to prevent recurrent AST.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = abscess
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8/81. Ingested foreign body in young children.

    Locally, ingested foreign body is a problem commonly seen in the adult patients. Paediatric patients constituted about 6.5% of all cases of ingested foreign body. In adults and older children who are able to communicate, the management is usually straight forward. However, the diagnosis of ingested foreign body in a prelingual child may pose a problem as the child is unable to talk. A high index of suspicion is needed in the diagnosis of ingested foreign body. This article presents a case of undiagnosed ingested foreign body causing pharyngeal perforation with retropharyngeal abscess in a two year-old boy. The management of ingested foreign body in young children is discussed.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = abscess
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9/81. Congenital fistula of the apex of the pyriform sinus: an overlooked phenomenon of debatable origin.

    fistula of the pyriform sinus apex is an often overlooked entity which generally manifests itself as acute suppurative thyroiditis or recurrent deep neck abscesses in children or young adults. Two cases are reported. Arguments in favor of a fourth pharyngeal pouch origin are stressed and the surgical management is described.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = abscess
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10/81. Fourth branchial pouch sinus with recurrent deep cervical abscesses successfully treated with trichloroacetic acid cauterization.

    A previously healthy 13-year-old girl presented with a left-sided deep cervical abscess. A CT scan demonstrated an abscess in the lower neck, anterior to the common carotid artery. Treatment with i.v. antibiotics and incision drainage resolved the condition. A recurrence of the abscess 7 months later was treated identically. Further investigations with MRI showed a 2-3-mm wide, 10-mm long structure in the lateral aspect of the left thyroid lobe. A barium radiograph depicted a narrow, 20-mm long fistula originating from the left pharynx. At endoscopy a 2-3-mm wide opening was found at the left pyriform sinus apex. This, together with the radiological findings, verified the diagnosis of a 4th branchial pouch sinus. The recurrence of the abscess may have been due to contamination by infectious pharyngeal secretions. Although radical surgical excision is traditionally recommended for this condition a non-invasive treatment, namely chemocauterization with 40% trichloroacetic acid (TCA), was chosen in this case. Three cauterizations were needed to close the pyriform sinus opening. To date (Month 14) there has been no recurrence of the cervical abscesses. TCA chemocauterization seems to be a safe first-line treatment for patients with a pyriform sinus fistula.
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ranking = 4.5
keywords = abscess
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