Cases reported "Pharyngeal Neoplasms"

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1/6. Surgical voice restoration with the Blom-Singer prosthesis following laryngopharyngoesophagectomy and pharyngogastric anastomosis.

    Surgical voice restoration using the Blom-Singer technique is a well-established procedure in patients who have undergone simple laryngectomy. Operations for hypopharyngeal carcinoma are more extensive and require reconstruction using regional skin or myocutaneous flaps, or reanastomosis with colon, jejunum, or stomach. We report the use of the Blom-Singer prosthesis in four patients who had undergone pharyngogastric repair following laryngopharyngoesophagectomy and who had failed to achieve a satisfactory voice. All patients initially developed good speech using the prosthesis. Two patients subsequently had their prostheses removed: one because of recurrent malignant disease and one because the procedure had not significantly altered the quality of the voice. The remaining two patients have continued to use the device at 2 and 5 years after insertion with good voice production.
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2/6. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the hypopharynx.

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma has been the most common soft-tissue sarcoma of late adult life. However, it is relatively uncommon in the head and neck. Furthermore, there has been no report of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the hypopharynx in the literature. The first case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the hypopharynx is presented. The patient, a 70-year-old male, underwent extended laryngectomy and elective neck dissection with primary tracheoesophageal shunt operation and pharyngeal myotomy for voice restoration following total laryngectomy. For more than 2 years, there has been no evidence of the disease or metastasis. He has the satisfactory phonatory and swallowing function.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = voice
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3/6. Pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. Is a skin-lined pharynx necessary?

    Current methods of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction have in common the creation of an epithelial lined pharynx. We performed eight cases of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction with a pectoralis major muscle flap. In the first six cases, split-thickness skin was quilted onto the muscle. In the last two cases, pectoralis major muscle alone was used, allowing epithelialization to occur from adjacent mucosa. The results with this simplified technique have been as good as when a skin-grafted muscle flap was used. We prefer a pectoralis major muscle flap, with or without split-thickness skin, to a pectoralis myocutaneous flap. There is no hair growth, it is easy to tube, and a thin-walled pharynx is produced. This is an advantage for the development of an esophageal voice, and tracheoesophageal puncture can be easily performed if no voice is achieved. All of our patients received full-dose, preoperative radiotherapy. One patient developed a fistula that closed spontaneously. There have been no strictures at the pharyngoesophageal junction. All patients quickly established a good oral intake.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = voice
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4/6. Pharyngoesophageal reconstruction using the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap: preliminary results.

    Pharyngoesophageal reconstruction remains a challenge to the head and neck surgeon. The goals of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction include restoration, with minimal morbidity, of a person's ability to swallow and to speak. Myocutaneous flaps, gastric pull-up, and the jejunal free flap are popular methods of pharyngoesophageal reconstruction; however, none of these modalities is clearly ideal. We have begun utilizing the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. Twelve patients have had reconstruction with this flap with follow-up from 2 to 15 months. Seven defects were circumferential, and five were noncircumferential. Ten patients (83%) have had successful restoration of both swallowing ability and voice. Donor site morbidity was minimal. The leading complication was salivary leak, which was present in eight (67%) patients. Five of the leaks closed with nonsurgical intervention. No cases of flap necrosis occurred. The radial forearm free flap is a thin and pliable flap that closely approximates the tissue consistency of normal pharynx. Successful restoration of a patient's ability to swallow approximates that of enteral flaps and is superior to that of MC flaps. Successful speech restoration is superior to that of enteral and MC flaps. Donor site morbidity is less than that caused by enteral flaps because laparotomy is avoided. Salivary leak is higher than with enteral flaps. Part of this difference is accountable to the high number of secondary and technically challenging reconstructions in this series, and we have taken steps to lower this rate of leakage. These preliminary data show that the radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap is well suited for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = voice
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5/6. Malignant mesenchymoma of the retropharyngeal space.

    Malignant mesenchymoma is a very rare head and neck tumour. To date only 15 cases have been reported in world literature and all in children under 16 years of age. We present here a case of a 40-year-old man with malignant mesenchymoma of the retropharyngeal space. The clinical picture is that of progressive dysphagia, voice change, snoring and dyspnoea. CT scan showed a soft tissue space-occupying lesion of the retropharyngeal space which enhanced very well with intravenous contrast. The tumour was excised in toto and the patient given post-operative radiotherapy. Histopathology showed two unrelated differentiated tissue types (bone and fat) in addition to the fibrosarcomatous element thus satisfying Stout's criteria (Stout, 1948) for a diagnosis of malignant mesenchymoma.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = voice
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6/6. The longus colli muscle flap for reconstruction of the lateral pharyngeal wall.

    BACKGROUND: Full-thickness lateral pharyngeal wall (LPW) defects are difficult to reconstruct, whether the larynx is preserved or removed (extended total laryngectomy). A simple, reliable reconstructive method using local tissue which optimizes wound healing and functional results would allow partial laryngectomy more often, without incurring the cost, donor site morbidity, and increased operative length of regional or free flaps. My objective was to propose use of the longus colli muscle as a reconstructive flap for defects of the LPW. methods: Results of using the longus colli muscle flap (LCMF) in a series of 16 patients with primary tumors of the pharyngeal wall or pyriform sinus are presented. The majority had surgery and planned postoperative radiotherapy. RESULTS: There were no wound infections or fistulas. One of 2 previously radiated patients had a transient wound-healing problem. Although 88% of the patients were stage III and IV and 50% had T3-4 primary tumors, there were only 2 local failures, for a local control rate of 88%. Corresponding cancer-free survival was 69% (median follow-up of 22 months). Two thirds of the patients took all or some food by mouth, and of the 12 with larynx preserved, 58% were decannulated, and 11 had a good to normal voice. CONCLUSIONS: The reliability of wound healing and absence of negative impact on oncologic and functional results validate use of the LCMF as a reconstructive option for defects in the LPW at both the oropharynx and hypopharynx levels.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = voice
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