Cases reported "Pharyngitis"

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1/56. infectious mononucleosis.

    infectious mononucleosis is a unique disease in its hematologic aspects; it is different from the frequently occurring acute microbial diseases in that it affects primarily the reticuloendothelial system; and it is interesting serologically because of the heterophil antibody reaction, as well as the multiplicity of antibodies which may be produced. The diagnosis should be suspected clinically before hematology is reported - by remembering the prototypes. In fact, a patient between 16 and 25 years old complains of sore throat and fever is more likely to have infectious mononucleosis than another disease; and if - in addition - he is jaundiced, a diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis is almost certain. Finally, a negative result of treatment with corticosteroid has the diagnostic significance mentioned above. Positive effect of treatment has no diagnostic significance.
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ranking = 1
keywords = infectious mononucleosis, mononucleosis, fever
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2/56. Periodic fever and pharyngitis in young children: a new disease for the otolaryngologist?

    OBJECTIVE: A clinical entity consisting of periodic fever associated with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis termed "PFAPA syndrome" in young children (<5 years old) may be unfamiliar to otolaryngologists. We present our 5-year experience of PFAPA syndrome. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Tertiary academic. patients: A 5-year retrospective chart review for children (<5 years old) who have undergone tonsillectomies with and without adenoidectomies was conducted. medical records from subjects who underwent the procedures for recurrent pharyngitis were reviewed with reference to a history of periodic fever and stomatitis associated with pharyngitis. INTERVENTIONS: tonsillectomy with and without adenoidectomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The objective measure was a comparison of the number of visits to the primary care physician for pharyngitis associated with fever in a 3-month period before and after the surgical intervention. The subjective measure was a telephone interview evaluating preoperative and postoperative symptoms. RESULTS: Of the 117 patients identified, 22 (19%) underwent surgery for recurrent pharyngitis. Five subjects (average age, 2.5 years) were identified as having PFAPA syndrome. The average number of preoperative PFAPA-related complaints was 11.6 compared with 0.2 for the number of postoperative PFAPA-related complaints (P=.03). CONCLUSIONS: Our experience suggests that PFAPA syndrome is an uncommon disease. Most of these children have undergone workup(s) for sepsis performed by their pediatricians because of the associated high fever. The clinical history of this cohort was quite distinctive. This small sample suggests a significant decrease if not cessation of pharyngitis following surgical intervention.
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ranking = 0.030535030536477
keywords = fever
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3/56. Pyopneumothorax: a complication of streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis.

    A 20-y-old African-American female with streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis presented with tension pyopneumothorax. Her illness began with fever and sore throat that persisted for several days. She then developed a left neck swelling, followed by difficult swallowing and cough. Subsequently, she developed shortness of breath that became severe. On physical examination fever (39.2 degrees C), exudative pharyngitis, tenderness and swelling in the left anterior cervical area were noted. Chest X-ray revealed left side pneumothorax, air-fluid level and near-complete collapse of the left lung with displacement of the heart and trachea to the right. Computed tomography scan of the neck revealed swelling and enhancement of the sternocleidomastoid muscle with loculated fluid collection, inflammation in the left anterior medial neck displacing the trachea extending into the mediastinum and the left apex. Thoracentesis revealed purulent fluid; Gram stain showed gram-positive cocci in chains; culture yielded pure growth of streptococcus pyogenes. She was treated with high dose penicillin, several chest tubes and intra-pleural injections of streptokinase with gradual resolution. This complication has not been described previously in streptococcus pyogenes pharyngitis.
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ranking = 0.0076337576341192
keywords = fever
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4/56. PFAPA syndrome (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, Adenitis).

    This paper aims to remind paediatric clinicians to suspect and confirm 'PFAPA' syndrome (Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome). We report two cases of PFAPA syndrome: a 3-year-old healthy boy with atopic rhinitis and a boy aged 8 years 5 months who simultaneously had lymphocytic vasculitis syndrome treated with immunosuppressive drugs. Both met Marshall's criteria. The literature regarding PFAPA syndrome was complied using a medline search for articles published between 1963 and 1998 and we then reviewed the reference lists of the articles. The medline search revealed 28 cases with available clinical manifestations, management and prognosis. Our study describes two additional cases. We divided the cases into typical (28 cases) and atypical (two cases) PFAPA syndrome. In typical PFAPA, the age of onset was less than 5 years in most cases and the patients presented 4.9 /- 1.4 days of fever (100%), pharyngitis (89.3%), cervical adenitis (72.1%), stomatitis (71.4%), malaise (64.3%), headache (60.7%), abdominal pain (53.6%) and nausea/vomiting (17.9%). Afebrile intervals were 3.2 /- 2.4 months and increased with age. The time from initial onset to final episode was 3 years 7 months /- 3 years 6 months. The total number of episodes was 8.3 /- 2.5 (range 6-14). Effective treatment included steroids, tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy and cimetidine. The general outcome was good. In atypical PFAPF, the clinical manifestations were similar to those of typical PFAPA except that the age of onset was more than 5 years, and life-threatening intestinal perforation happened once in a patient with underlying Fanconi's anaemia. It was concluded that typical PFAPA syndrome is benign and can be diagnosed by detailed history-taking and from physical findings during repeated febrile episodes with tests to rule out other periodic fever syndromes. A review of the literatures since the first report in 1987 has shown that typical PFAPA syndrome is not associated with significant long-term sequelae and has a good response to steroids. One patient with atypical PFAPA, who received low-dose steroids for over 1 year, developed intestinal perforation after an increment of the 7-day steroid dose. If an underlying problem requires long-term immunosuppressive medication, it is wiser to choose cimetidine rather than increasing the steroid dosage to resolve atypical PFAPA.
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ranking = 0.0076337576341192
keywords = fever
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5/56. A hard thyroid mass due to plasma cell granuloma.

    plasma cell granuloma involving the thyroid is very rare. A 29-year-old man with type 1 diabetes mellitus presented with a one-week history of fever, sore throat, neck tenderness and dysphagia. Antibiotics were given but over the next two weeks a hard 8 cm mass in the left lobe of the thyroid developed. Fine needle aspiration was not diagnostic and surgical exploration revealed an inflammatory process arising from the left lobe of the thyroid involving the left sternothyroid muscle and parapharyngeal spaces. histology of multiple biopsies showed plasma cell granuloma. Immunoperoxidase staining demonstrated the presence of IgG, IgM and IgA with predominance of IgG. The residual mass resolved and was impalpable after four weeks. plasma cell granuloma should be suspected when there is a rapidly developing hard thyroid mass. Open biopsy/removal and histological confirmation are mandatory and residual disease may resolve within weeks.
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ranking = 0.0038168788170596
keywords = fever
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6/56. Serious adverse events associated with yellow fever 17DD vaccine in brazil: a report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: The yellow fever vaccine is regarded as one of the safest attenuated virus vaccines, with few side-effects or adverse events. We report the occurrence of two fatal cases of haemorrhagic fever associated with yellow fever 17DD substrain vaccine in brazil. methods: We obtained epidemiological, serological, virological, pathological, immunocytochemical, and molecular biological data on the two cases to determine the cause of the illnesses. FINDINGS: The first case, in a 5-year-old white girl, was characterised by sudden onset of fever accompanied by headache, malaise, and vomiting 3 days after receiving yellow fever and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines. Afterwards she decompensated with icterus and haemorrhagic signs and died after a 5-day illness. The second patient-a 22-year-old black woman-developed a sore throat and fever accompanied by headache, myalgia, nausea, and vomiting 4 days after yellow fever vaccination. She then developed icterus, renal failure, and haemorrhagic diathesis, and died after 6 days of illness. yellow fever virus was recovered in suckling mice and C6/36 cells from blood in both cases, as well as from fragments of liver, spleen, skin, and heart from the first case and from these and other viscera fragments in case 2. rna of yellow fever virus was identical to that previously described for 17D genomic sequences. IgM ELISA tests for yellow fever virus were negative in case 1 and positive in case 2; similar tests for dengue, hantaviruses, arenaviruses, leptospira, and hepatitis viruses A-D were negative. Tissue injuries from both patients were typical of wild-type yellow fever. INTERPRETATION: These serious and hitherto unknown complications of yellow fever vaccination are extremely rare, but the safety of yellow fever 17DD vaccine needs to be reviewed. Host factors, probably idiosyncratic reactions, might have had a substantial contributed to the unexpected outcome.
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ranking = 0.064886939890014
keywords = fever
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7/56. Prospective identification and treatment of children with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with group A streptococcal infection (PANDAS).

    BACKGROUND: The current diagnostic criteria for pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with group A streptococcal infection (PANDAS) are pediatric onset, neuropsychiatric disorder (obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD]) and/or tic disorder; abrupt onset and/or episodic course of symptoms; association with group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection; and association with neurological abnormalities (motoric hyperactivity or adventitious movements, including choreiform movements or tics). OBJECTIVE: To assess new-onset PANDAS cases in relation to acute GABHS tonsillopharyngitis. DESIGN: Prospective PANDAS case identification and follow-up. RESULTS: Over a 3-year period (1998-2000), we identified 12 school-aged children with new-onset PANDAS. Each patient had the abrupt appearance of severe OCD behaviors, accompanied by mild symptoms and signs of acute GABHS tonsillopharyngitis. Throat swabs tested positive for GABHS by rapid antigen detection and/or were culture positive. The GABHS serologic tests, when performed (n = 3), showed very high antideoxyribonuclease antibody titers. Mean age at presentation was 7 years (age range, 5-11 years). In children treated with antibiotics effective in eradicating GABHS infection at the sentinel episode, OCD symptoms promptly disappeared. Follow-up throat cultures negative for GABHS were obtained prospectively after the first PANDAS episode. recurrence of OCD symptoms was seen in 6 patients; each recurrence was associated with evidence of acute GABHS infection and responded to antibiotic therapy, supporting the premise that these patients were not GABHS carriers. The OCD behaviors exhibited included hand washing and preoccupation with germs, but daytime urinary urgency and frequency without dysuria, fever, or incontinence were the most notable symptoms in our series (58% of patients). Symptoms disappeared at night, and urinalysis and urine cultures were negative. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study to confirm that PANDAS is associated with acute GABHS tonsillopharyngitis and responds to appropriate antibiotic therapy at the sentinel episode.
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ranking = 0.0038168788170596
keywords = fever
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8/56. The evolution of lemierre syndrome: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    lemierre syndrome (postanginal septicemia) is caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection with secondary septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and frequent metastatic infections. A high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis. fusobacterium necrophorum is the usual etiologic agent. The disease progresses in several steps. The first stage is the primary infection, which is usually a pharyngitis (87.1% of cases). This is followed by local invasion of the lateral pharyngeal space and IJV septic thrombophlebitis (documented in 71.5% of cases), and finally, the occurrence of metastatic complications (present in 90% of cases at the time of diagnosis). A sore throat is the most common symptom during the primary infection (82.5% of cases). During invasion of the lateral pharyngeal space and IJV septic thrombophlebitis, a swollen and/or tender neck is the most common finding (52.2% of patients) and should be considered a red flag in patients with current or recent pharyngitis. The most common site of metastatic infection is the lungs (79.8% of cases). In contrast to the preantibiotic era, cavitating pneumonia and septic arthritis are now uncommon. Most patients (82.5%) had fever at some stage during the course of the disease. Gastrointestinal complaints such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting were common (49.5% of cases). An elevated white blood cell count occurred in 75.2% of cases. hyperbilirubinemia with slight elevation of liver enzyme levels occurred in one-third of patients, but frank jaundice was uncommon, in contrast to its high frequency reported in the preantibiotic era. We conclude that, most likely as a consequence of widespread antibiotic use for pharyngeal infections, the typical course of the disease has changed since Lemierre's original description. The typical triad in our series was: pharyngitis, a tender/swollen neck, and noncavitating pulmonary infiltrates. The previous classical description of severe sepsis with cavitating pneumonia and septic arthritis was not commonly seen in our review. mortality was low in our series (6.4%), but significant morbidity occurred, which was likely preventable by early diagnosis and treatment. The pathophysiology, natural history, diagnostic methods for internal jugular vein thrombosis, and management are discussed.
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ranking = 0.0038168788170596
keywords = fever
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9/56. Acute streptococcal infection of the gingiva, lower lip, and pharynx--a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcal gingivostomatitis is a rare phenomenon in a non-compromised host and not commonly reported in the dental literature. early diagnosis and distinction from viral infections, especially HSV infection, are of the utmost importance. The early use of penicillin is essential in preventing a cascade of events, resulting in severe fasciitis, destruction of tissues, and subsequent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. methods: A unique case of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection affecting the pharynx, lower lip, and gingiva of a healthy 19-year-old male is presented. RESULTS: The streptococcal infection was responsive to penicillin treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In view of the increased use of antibiotics and the development of aggressive strains, the dental clinician has to consider streptococcal infection in the differential diagnosis of gingival and soft tissue infections.
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ranking = 0.0038168788170596
keywords = fever
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10/56. A case of baboon syndrome associated with group a streptococcal infection.

    We described a 21-year-old Japanese patient with sore throat, fever, and diffuse erythema on the neck, trunk, and limbs. erythema markedly appeared on the neck, axillary, antecubital, and popliteal fossae. However, other skin signs of scarlet fever such as red strawberry tongue and linear petechial eruption did not appear. Before his visit to our clinic, he had been diagnosed as pharyngitis and treated with cefaclor 750 mg daily for six days. However, the symptoms did not improve. Oral prednisolone of 20 mg daily rapidly improved all the symptoms. Pharyngeal culture grew streptococcus pyogenes that was sensitive to cefaclor. Laboratory findings showed elevated serum levels of antibody against streptolysin O. Together with the distribution of erythema, culture of Streptococcal pyogenes, and elevated anti-streptolysin O titer, the diagnosis of baboon syndrome associated with streptococcal infection was made. This seems to be the first report of baboon syndrome due to streptococcal infection.
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ranking = 0.0076337576341192
keywords = fever
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