Cases reported "Pharyngitis"

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11/41. The evolution of lemierre syndrome: report of 2 cases and review of the literature.

    lemierre syndrome (postanginal septicemia) is caused by an acute oropharyngeal infection with secondary septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and frequent metastatic infections. A high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis. fusobacterium necrophorum is the usual etiologic agent. The disease progresses in several steps. The first stage is the primary infection, which is usually a pharyngitis (87.1% of cases). This is followed by local invasion of the lateral pharyngeal space and IJV septic thrombophlebitis (documented in 71.5% of cases), and finally, the occurrence of metastatic complications (present in 90% of cases at the time of diagnosis). A sore throat is the most common symptom during the primary infection (82.5% of cases). During invasion of the lateral pharyngeal space and IJV septic thrombophlebitis, a swollen and/or tender neck is the most common finding (52.2% of patients) and should be considered a red flag in patients with current or recent pharyngitis. The most common site of metastatic infection is the lungs (79.8% of cases). In contrast to the preantibiotic era, cavitating pneumonia and septic arthritis are now uncommon. Most patients (82.5%) had fever at some stage during the course of the disease. Gastrointestinal complaints such as abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting were common (49.5% of cases). An elevated white blood cell count occurred in 75.2% of cases. hyperbilirubinemia with slight elevation of liver enzyme levels occurred in one-third of patients, but frank jaundice was uncommon, in contrast to its high frequency reported in the preantibiotic era. We conclude that, most likely as a consequence of widespread antibiotic use for pharyngeal infections, the typical course of the disease has changed since Lemierre's original description. The typical triad in our series was: pharyngitis, a tender/swollen neck, and noncavitating pulmonary infiltrates. The previous classical description of severe sepsis with cavitating pneumonia and septic arthritis was not commonly seen in our review. mortality was low in our series (6.4%), but significant morbidity occurred, which was likely preventable by early diagnosis and treatment. The pathophysiology, natural history, diagnostic methods for internal jugular vein thrombosis, and management are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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12/41. Lemierre's syndrome: post-anginal septicemia.

    Lemierre's syndrome is an obscure entity with very significant related morbidity. We describe a typical case and a never before reported complication. Increased awareness of this condition is necessary, since it is given little consideration even when patients present with the very characteristic clinical picture. US will depict internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis in most cases and should be the modality of choice for the initial evaluation of suspected thrombosis of the IJVs. Associated demonstration of cavitary pulmonary nodules establishes the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. Early recognition and institution of adequate antimicrobial therapy are key points in the successful management of this syndrome.
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ranking = 1.5532029006475
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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13/41. Unusual presentation of Lemierre's syndrome due to fusobacterium nucleatum.

    We report a case of Lemierre's syndrome due to fusobacterium nucleatum in a previously healthy 19-year-old male. This is the first case report of Lemierre's syndrome due to thrombophlebitis of the external jugular vein. The patient had a rapid clinical response to anticoagulation and antibiotics, as supported by anecdotal evidence.
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ranking = 0.05128636116608
keywords = vein
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14/41. Serious consequences of a sore throat.

    Lemierre's syndrome, caused by fusobacterium necrophorum, is a potentially fatal sequelae of a sore throat characterised by septicaemia, internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis and metastatic abscesses. The Chief Medical Officer reported in February 2001 that the incidence is increasing. Two cases seen in one year, with different presentations, are reported. The first patient presented with sepsis, jaundice, hepatic abscesses and portal vein/superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, whilst the second presented with sepsis, sore throat and internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis. Both patients were treated with antibiotics and anticoagulants with a favourable outcome.
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ranking = 1.1025727223322
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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15/41. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) in the treatment of lemierre syndrome.

    In 1936 Lemierre described an aggressive neck infection with a high mortality rate. In the original characterization, he describes a pharyngotonsillitis and/or peritonsillar infection followed by unilateral swelling and tenderness along the sternocleidomastoid muscle owing to septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein. Subsequent to invasion and thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, fusobacterium necrophorum septicemia occurs, with rigors, high fever, and septic thromboembolism to peripheral sites, especially the lungs and bones. This entity became known as lemierre syndrome. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) has been described as adjunctive treatment in two cases of postanginal septicemia. This case describes the combined approach to a case of lemierre syndrome in which HBO2 was added as an adjunct to the treatment, with a favorable and rapid improvement in the patient's condition.
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ranking = 0.10257272233216
keywords = vein
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16/41. Lemierre's syndrome: how a sore throat can end in disaster.

    Lemierre's syndrome is characterised by a history of recent oropharyngeal infection, clinical or radiological evidence of internal jugular vein thrombophlebitis and isolation of an anaerobic pathogen. We present a case report and review the literature.
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ranking = 0.05128636116608
keywords = vein
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17/41. Case of Lemierre's syndrome presenting with thyroid abscess.

    Lemierre's syndrome is an uncommon condition characterized by post-anginal septicemia due to anaerobes. Reported here is a case of Lemierre's syndrome presenting with thyroid and liver abscesses. At presentation, the 70-year-old female patient complained of fever, jaundice and neck pain. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound confirmed the presence of a left-sided internal jugular vein thrombosis as well as abscesses in the left thyroid lobe and the right lobe of the liver with pleural effusion. The thyroid abscess was treated with a left lobectomy.
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ranking = 0.80224463090678
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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18/41. Computed tomographic findings in lemierre syndrome.

    lemierre syndrome, also known as postanginal septicemia, has long been taken as an uncommon condition with life-threatening potential. It, resulting from acute oropharyngeal infection, could lead to septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein (IJV). Substantial decrease of mortality and morbidity with the introduction of antibiotics has made this syndrome into a status that is frequently forgotten or overlooked when it appears. The purpose of this article is to refresh awareness on the side of physicians of this syndrome by means of modern image tools. As such, even this dire neck infection is rare after the advent of sophisticated antibiotics, its unique computed tomography findings can facilitate the correct image diagnosis and pertinent treatment.
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ranking = 0.05128636116608
keywords = vein
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19/41. Lemierre's syndrome: three cases and a review.

    Postanginal sepsis, also called Lemierre's syndrome, is a rare but acute medical condition complicating oropharyngeal infection. The pathogenesis consists of the development of internal jugular vein septic thrombophlebitis leading to metastatic infections in the lung and other sites. The causative microorganism is most often fusobacterium necrophorum. We present three patients with Lemierre's syndrome who presented to the Leiden University Medical Center and give a review of the literature.
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ranking = 0.05128636116608
keywords = vein
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20/41. A case of the otogenic variant of Lemierre's syndrome with atypical sequelae and a review of pediatric literature.

    We report a case of an 8-year-old girl who presented with the clinical picture of Lemierre's syndrome (LS) secondary to bilateral mastoiditis. She developed unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) along with internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis, septic arthritis of her ankle and cervical fasciitis. Combined antimicrobial, anticoagulant and surgical treatment helped reverse all the effects of the sequelae, including nearly all the hearing loss. This is a unique case of this uncommon variant of the syndrome and with an uncommonly reported complication. The literature indicates that pediatric cases are a minority and enforces that successful management rests on awareness of the condition, vigil and promptness of communication of a multidisciplinary pediatric team.
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ranking = 0.80224463090678
keywords = thrombosis, vein
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