Cases reported "Pheochromocytoma"

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1/301. heart failure induced by pheochromocytoma: laparoscopic treatment and intraoperative changes of several new cardiovascular hormones.

    Since 1992, adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma has been recognized as a safe and efficient technique when performed by a laparoscopic approach. Most of the cases of pheochromocytomas treated as such and published in the literature were not associated with malignant hypertension and acute heart failure. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who presented with this clinical picture and show that laparoscopic adrenalectomy may be as safe and efficient as conventional adrenalectomy when performed in this situation. The intraoperative changes in the secretion of catecholamines, endothelin-1, angiotensin ii, N- and C-terminus of atrial natriuretic factor prohormone were also analyzed. Noradrenaline release during tumor dissection was associated with a stimulation of atrial natriuretic factor.
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2/301. Unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by contralateral retroperitoneoscopic partial adrenalectomy in a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2a syndrome.

    We report the first patient who had bilateral pheochromocytoma associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2a syndrome (men 2a) and underwent unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by contralateral retroperitoneoscopic partial adrenalectomy 2 years later. The postoperative course was uneventful both times, and the patient was cured of hypertension without any need for steroid replacement. Endoscopic partial adrenalectomy is a minimally invasive procedure for pheochromocytoma with mild symptoms. We believe that this procedure has considerable potential for treating bilateral pheochromocytoma, which is frequently observed in patients with men 2a.
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3/301. Unilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia: another form of curable hypertension?

    A case of unilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia is presented in a 49-year-old caucasian female without multiple endocrine neoplasia association. The patient presented with episodic hypertension and paroxysms suggesting an underlying phaeochromocytoma. Biochemical supported this diagnosis but no discrete tumour was found on preoperative localising studies or at the time of surgery. The patient underwent a unilateral adrenalectomy with confirming adrenal medullary hyperplasia with complete resolution of her symptoms for six months.
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4/301. Extra-adrenal phechromocytoma and renal cell carcinoma--an unusual case of tumour synchronism.

    We report an unusual case of tumour synchronism combining an extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma and a renal cell carcinoma in a 48-year-old male. The most usual forms of presentation are described in accordance with their clinical significance. We emphasize the diagnostic importance of specific biochemical studies and the accurate anatomical localization of extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy with 131 iodine-methyliodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG). Surgical excision was the treatment of choice after the institution of adequate preoperative cardiovascular management. Pertinent features of the natural history of these tumours are described in accordance with their different embryological origin.
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5/301. Unsuspected pheochromocytoma with abdominal aortic aneurysm--a case report.

    This case report describes the peri-operative management of a 65-year-old man with an unsuspected pheochromocytoma. He underwent emergent surgery for a rupturing abdominal aortic aneurysm. During surgery his blood pressure changed dramatically and was resistant to drug treatment. A pheochromocytoma was suspected, but the emergency precluded immediate investigation. A second hypertension episode occurred in the intensive care unit, and CT revealed an abnormal adrenal mass. Surgery for the pheochromocytoma was carried out successfully later, with the hypertension being managed very carefully. We considered that exposure to extraordinary catecholamine levels from the pheochromocytoma might have contributed to the development of the abdominal aortic aneurysm.
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6/301. Anesthetic management for pheochromocytoma resection using spinal cord stimulation and intravenous nicardipine--a case report.

    We have used spinal cord stimulation (SCS), diazepam and nitrous oxide for maintenance of general anesthesia. blood pressure was maintained by bolus administration of nicardipine for the removal of pheochromocytoma. Both SCS and nicardipine reduced systemic vascular resistance and SCS increased cardiac output. However, neither SCS nor nicardipine could inhibit the release of norepinephrine. SCS proved to be useful as one of anesthetic technique during the removal of pheochromocytoma, and also in the management of postoperative pain and the prevention of complications.
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7/301. Difficult anesthetic management during pheochromocytoma surgery.

    The anesthetic management of two middle-aged patients having surgical removal of large pheochromocytomas is described. The same team of physicians was involved in the care of the patients, including an endocrinologist, who supervised their preoperative care. Although the preoperative care included pharmacologic adrenergic receptor blockade and fluid administration, guidelines for surgical readiness did not follow those recommended in our literature. Both patients experienced severe intraoperative hypotension after complete interruption of the tumors' venous drainage, and one patient suffered a cardiac arrest. Explanations for the occurrence of these problems are discussed, including factors relating to the complexity of the disease process. However, it is conceivable that appropriate input from the anesthesiologist during the preoperative preparation of these patients may have ameliorated, if not prevented, the encountered difficulties.
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8/301. Exaggerated cardiovascular response to anaesthesia--a case for investigation.

    We present a case of a 40-year-old woman who developed major cardiovascular complications during anaesthesia for an elective clipping of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation. Postoperative investigation confirmed the diagnosis of an adrenal phaeochromocytoma. In retrospect, it became apparent that she had experienced a series of potentially life-threatening events over a 20-year period all of which are known complications of phaeochromocytoma. This case highlights the importance of investigating young patients who have unexpected and unexplained cardiovascular events during anaesthesia and surgery.
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9/301. pheochromocytoma and sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy: diagnosis, medical pre-treatment and cure by laparoscopic unilateral adrenalectomy.

    The coexistence of pheochromocytoma and primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome of the same adrenal gland has rarely been reported. We describe here the case of a female patient presenting with mild Cushing's stigmata, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in whom we diagnosed a pheochromocytoma of the left adrenal gland with coexisting non-ACTH-dependent cortisol hypersecretion. While hormonal work-up was still in progress, the patient became pregnant and wanted to carry her pregnancy to full-term. A laparoscopic adrenalectomy in the 17th week of gestation was decided upon and the patient accordingly prepared for surgery by pre-treatment with phenoxybenzamine. Successful surgery--the first ever reported laparoscopic resection of a pheochromocytoma in pregnancy--without perioperative complications was performed under general anesthesia, with the patient receiving peri- and post-operative hydrocortisone substitution. Pathohistological examination revealed a pheochromocytoma with positive immunostaining for interleukin-6 (IL-6) and negative immunostaining for ACTH, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and cytochrome P450, and with no signs of malignancy. A paracrine stimulation of the ipsilateral adrenal cortex by IL-6 produced by the pheochromocytoma, leading to cortical hyperplasia and subclinical Cushing's syndrome, is suggested by the positive immunostaining for IL-6 and the MRI findings. Post-operatively, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensued, necessitating continuing hydrocortisone replacement over 12 months. hypertension resolved after surgery, and diabetes after the uncomplicated vaginal delivery at term.
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10/301. Prolonged hypoglycaemia following surgical removal of phaeochromocytoma.

    We report a 34-year-old woman with secondary hypertension diagnosed with a left-sided phaeochromocytoma. Excision of the tumour resulted in recurrent hypoglycaemia up to 6 days post-operatively. We discuss the pathogenesis of hypoglycaemia following removal of the tumour and put forward hypothesis for the recurrent hypoglycaemia.
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ranking = 0.2
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