Cases reported "Pigmentation Disorders"

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1/49. Pigmented purpuric dermatosis in a young male.

    The pigmented purpuric dermatoses (PPD) are a group of disorders that most often occur on the lower extremities of middle-aged adults as asymptomatic, yellow-orange patches with petechiae. The PPD represent a benign, often chronic, capillaritis of unknown cause. We present a case of PPD on the abdomen of a young male and emphasize careful observation in such a patient to reveal possible progression to purpuric mycosis fungoides.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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2/49. Koraxitrachitic syndrome: a syndromic form of self-healing collodion baby with residual dappled atrophy of the derma.

    We report on a child with a generalized skin disorder associated with other minor anomalies. At birth, the child presented as a collodion baby, with patchy erythema, generalized irregular dermal atrophy, alopecia, absent eyelashes and eyebrows, and conjunctival pannus. He also had hypertelorism, prominent nasal root, large mouth, micrognathia, brachydactyly, syndactyly involving all interdigital spaces, and camptodactyly of fingers III-V. The hyperkeratotic membrane thinned progressively, leaving a mottled reticulated skin atrophy, with patchy areas of yellowish hyperpigmentation and papyraceous areas. hair and nails were dystrophic. Mental development was borderline normal. The histological hallmarks of the skin manifestations combined orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis and marked atrophy of the dermis. The dermal extracellular matrix was immature, and factor xiii-a positive dendrocytes were rare and globular rather than dendritic. We frame as a hypothesis that the disease is due to or associated with a defect in maturation of a subset of dermal dendrocytes during fetal life. This entity may be designed as the koraxitrachitic syndrome (kappaomicronrhoalphaxi:grapnel- taurhoalphachiiotatauepsilonsigma: roughness) copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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3/49. yellow nail syndrome: resolution of yellow nails after successful treatment of breast cancer.

    yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare entity of unknown cause in which congenitally hypoplastic lymphatics play a major role in the clinical manifestations of the disease. YNS has been associated with many malignancies and immune disorders. We report a case of new-onset YNS associated with breast cancer and dramatic improvement in the yellow nails with cancer treatment.
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ranking = 5
keywords = yellow
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4/49. Lycopenaemia.

    Over the last few years, carotenoids have been studied extensively for their antioxidant activity and the supposed protective effects against cancer, in particular those of the digestive tract. Consumption of carotenoids as anti-ageing agents is also widely diffuse. Moreover, the diffusion of slimming and vegetarian diets, and thus the consumption of fruit and vegetables, which contain large amount of carotenoids, is increasing. On the other hand, the excessive dietary intake of carotenoid-containing foods may cause different afflictions characterized by a 'yellow-orange' discoloration of the skin. One of these carotenoids, the lycopene, present in high concentrations in tomatoes, may cause a rare cutaneous disease called lycopenaemia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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5/49. Myeloma with xanthoderma due to an IgG lambdamonoclonal anti-flavin antibody.

    When yellow skin and yellow hair developed in an elderly patient with multiple myeloma, we ruled out the usual causes of such pigmentation but identified a monoclonal IgGlambda (lgGGar) with anti-flavin antibody activity. Purified IgGGar was bright yellow, and the acid-dissociated chromophore was identified as riboflavin by chromatography and absorption spectroscopy. Native IgGGar contained 1.45 moles of flavin per mole of IgG, and increased to 2 moles with addition of riboflavin to saturation. The flavin was localized to the Fab fragment and was bound to IgGGar with high affinity. IgGGar showed strongest affinities for riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and lower affinities for dinitrophenyl derivatives and naphthoquinone. The demonstration of hapten bound to the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin in this case suggests the possibility of bound but colorless haptens on other myeloma proteins as well as on normal immunoglobulins.
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ranking = 3
keywords = yellow
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6/49. adult vitelliform macular degeneration: a clinicopathological study.

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The yellow lesions of adult vitelliform macular degeneration (AVMD) slowly fade, progressing to hyperpigmentation or atrophy. This study aims to provide further observations on the location and nature of the vitelliform material. methods: This report describes the clinicopathological correlation of four eyes with AVMD. A retrospective histopathological study of a further 526 aged eyes previously graded for the stage of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) found another 10 eyes with similar pathology. RESULTS: The predominant finding was a collection of extracellular material beneath the sensory retina at the fovea. This material was derived internally from photoreceptor outer segments and externally from the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the latter first undergoing hypertrophy and then disruption and attenuation. Fallout of foveal cones occurred over these lesions and the inner retina was thinned, which may explain macular hole formation in this condition. All affected eyes showed histopathological evidence of AMD. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the vitelliform lesions of AVMD lie beneath the sensory retina. In contrast to previous reports, however, it is proposed that the lesions comprise mainly extracellular material consisting of photoreceptor debris, possibly the result of faulty phagocytosis by the RPE, mixed with pigment liberated as the RPE undergoes disruption. The vitelliform lesions therefore are a marker for the area of maximal RPE disturbance.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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7/49. Yellow nail pigmentation following Depakote therapy.

    Two months after being started on Depakote (divalproex sodium: Abbott laboratories Inc., Abbott Park, illinois), a 57-year-old female noticed the development of a transverse yellow band on all 20 proximal nails that eventually led to complete nail plate discoloration. Six to eight weeks after discontinuation of Depakote, normalization of her proximal nail plates was noted. Other anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and lithium have been documented to lead to nail pigmentation. Although several dermatologic reactions to Depakote have been described, we are not aware of any reported cases of nail discoloration secondary to Depakote. While our patient did have a history of renal disease with azotemia, we find it highly unlikely to be a contributing factor secondary to the fact that our patient's abnormality did not present similar to the nail abnormalities of renal disease. In conclusion, we found the temporal relationship between Depakote initiation/discontinuation and the nail discoloration to be highly indicative of Depakote as the source. Other anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and lithium have been documented to lead to nail pigmentation. Although several dermatologic reactions to Depakote have been described, we are not aware of any reported cases of nail discoloration secondary to Depakote. While our patient did have a history of renal disease with azotemia, we find it highly unlikely to be a contributing factor secondary to the fact that our patient's abnormality did not present similar to the nail abnormalities of renal disease. In conclusion, we found the temporal relationship between Depakote initiation/discontinuation and the nail discoloration to be highly indicative of Depakote as the source.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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8/49. An unusual case of an atypical eating disorder masquerading as a serious multi-systemic illness.

    An early diagnosis and multidisciplinary team approach are mandatory in the management of eating disorders. Serious organic symptoms and nutritional effects can mimic a systemic illness, particularly in those with atypical presentations. A 15-y-old adolescent male presented with poor growth, low weight, abdominal pain and yellow pigmentation. Further bizarre multi-system symptomatology resulted in a protracted admission with multiple investigations. An initial diagnosis of teratoma proved negative on abdominal laparotomy. A multidisciplinary approach followed by a feeding challenge led to the diagnosis of an eating disorder. The disorder, although more common in girls and adolescents, is increasing in incidence in both males and younger children. Conclusion: Atypical eating disorders are potentially serious and life-threatening illnesses, and paediatricians and psychologists should be aware of unusual presentations.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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9/49. Implantation of a pleurovenous shunt for massive chylothorax in a patient with yellow nail syndrome.

    yellow nail syndrome is a type of lymphatic dysplasia syndrome characterised by the triad of yellow nails, lymphoedema, and pleural effusions. The case history is presented of a 70 year old patient with yellow nail syndrome who complained of dyspnoea caused by massive chylothorax. The patient underwent insertion of a pleuroperitoneal shunt which resulted in abdominal distension and deterioration of leg oedema. The pleuroperitoneal shunt was replaced by a pleurovenous shunt on the right side which led to an improvement in the bilateral pleural effusions, abdominal distension, and leg oedema. A pleurovenous shunt may be an alternative rescue therapy for yellow nail syndrome.
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ranking = 7
keywords = yellow
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10/49. imipramine hyperpigmentation: a slate-gray discoloration caused by long-term imipramine administration.

    A 48-year-old white woman, skin type III, had a slate-gray discoloration of the face and dorsa of both hands after ingesting imipramine, 150 mg/day for 5 years. Her iris color was also darkened. One year after cessation of the therapy, the discoloration became lighter. Sun-protected skin showed no discoloration. light microscopy revealed an accumulation of doubly refractile golden yellow granules in the papillary dermis, mostly scattered, with some concentration around the blood vessels but not in the endothelial cells. Electron micrographs showed numerous amorphous electron-dense inclusion bodies in histiocytes, phagocytes, fibroblasts, and dermal dendrocytes. melanosomes were phagocytosed in the same cells but in separated locations. imipramine is structurally related to chlorpromazine and can cause slate-gray discoloration. However, the color of the granules deposited in the papillary dermis is golden-yellow and they are not deposited in endothelial cells.
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ranking = 2
keywords = yellow
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