Cases reported "Pityriasis"

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1/12. Atypical manifestations of pityriasis lichenoides chronica: development into paraneoplasia and non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the skin.

    Three patients with atypical courses and manifestations of pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) are presented. The first patient is a 21-year-old white woman who showed a good response of her PLC lesions as well as her reactive oligoarthritis to repeated PUVA treatments combined with oral prednisone during 1 year. The effect of the treatment then decreased. The patient developed a low-grade malignant lymphoma of the lung. When the lymphoma of the lung improved after chemotherapy, the PLC eruptions improved, too. The second patient is a 41-year-old man, whose Hodgkin's disease stage IVa was successfully treated by chemotherapy and radiotherapy in 1984. In 1987 he showed PLC lesions which responded well to puva therapy, later also in combination with etretinate. Until 1988 repeated skin biopsies revealed a non-specific eczematous pattern. In 1989 the recalcitrant PLC eruptions finally revealed a pleomorphic non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the skin with medium-sized cells. The third patient had a PLC for about 9 years when Hodgkin's disease stage Ia was diagnosed. At the beginning the skin biopsy showed an eczematous pattern, but 2 years later, in 1990, skin infiltrations of a large-cell, anaplastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma were seen. These cases show that PLC in rare cases may either represent a paraneoplastic skin disease or may itself develop into cutaneous lymphomas.
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2/12. Immunohistochemical distinction of lymphomatoid papulosis and pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta.

    lymphomatoid papulosis (LyP) and pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA) are benign self-healing cutaneous eruptions that may be clinically and histologically similar. However LyP has a 5% to 20% risk of associated lymphoid malignancy, whereas PLEVA does not. To determine whether the immunophenotype of lymphoid cells is useful in the distinction of these two disorders, the pattern of expression of lymphoid cell lineage and activation antigens in nine cases of LyP and seven cases of PLEVA were compared. In all cases of LyP most larger cells expressed the activation antigen Ki-1 (CD30) and lacked expression of the T-cell antigen CD7 and at least one other T-cell antigen (CD2, CD3, CD5). In contrast, CD30-antigen expression was rare or absent in PLEVA, CD3- and CD7-antigen expression was found in all cases, and diminished expression of T-cell antigens (CD2 and CD5) was seen in only one case. Diffuse expression of HLA-DR antigen by epidermal keratinocytes was found in a greater proportion of PLEVA cases (6 of 7) than LyP cases (3 of 6). In addition, CD8 cells predominated at the dermal/epidermal junction in 3 of 6 cases of PLEVA but in only 1 of 7 cases of LyP. We conclude that LyP and PLEVA can be distinguished immunohistochemically in most, if not all, cases. Furthermore these results suggest that LyP and PLEVA are separate disorders, thus accounting for their variable prognoses.
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3/12. pityriasis lichenoides-like eruption occurring during therapy for myelogenous leukemia.

    A 61-year-old Japanese man with chronic myelogenous leukemia developed pityriasis lichenoides-like eruptions during chemotherapy. Histopathological features were also consistent with the disease. The eruption in this case may have been an allergic reaction arising in a depressed immunity induced by chemotherapy.
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4/12. pityriasis rosea-like eruption associated with BCG vaccination.

    We report a case of a pityriasis rosea-like eruption in a 12-year-old boy several days following BCG vaccination. It is suggested that the BCG vaccination be included in the etiology of pityriasis rosea-like eruptions.
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5/12. pityriasis rosea and ketotifen.

    A 4-year-old female patient who developed a skin eruption similar to pityriasis rosea after treatment with ketotifen (Zaditen) is presented. The relationship between ketotifen and the eruption has been based on circumstantial evidence and confirmed by the positive results of the MIF test and the rat mast cell degranulation test.
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6/12. pityriasis rosea eruption in secondary syphilis: an isomorphic phenomenon?

    A 41-year-old man was referred because of a slightly pruritic eruption, and a classic case of pityriasis rosea was diagnosed on the first examination. Results of routine tests for syphilis were strongly positive, and on repeated examination the eruption had grown further. skin biopsy specimens showed plasma cells and treponema pallidum. All symptoms disappeared following antisyphilitic treatment. The possibility of an isomorphic response is discussed.
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7/12. Lichenoid eruption produced by captopril.

    captopril, an oral active dipeptidylcarboxypeptidase inhibitor with antihypertensive properties, has been reported to have the following cutaneous side effects: macular and papular skin eruptions, urticaria, angioedema, mouth ulcers, pemphigus, and pityriasis rosea-like eruptions. Here, to the best of our knowledge, is the first case in which a pityriasis rosea-like eruption evolved into a lichenoid drug eruption. Also discussed is the remarkable similarity in the side effects of captopril, gold compounds, d-penicillamine, and organic mercurials.
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8/12. isotretinoin dermatitis simulating acute pityriasis rosea.

    A pityriasis rosea-like eruption developed in two acne patients receiving isotretinoin and gradually resolved once the dosage was reduced. Histologically the lesions, which were characterized by psoriasiform hyperplasia, bore no resemblance to pityriasis rosea. We believe the eruptions were a side effect of isotretinoin therapy.
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9/12. Columnar epidermal necrosis. A special form of toxic epidermal reaction?

    A bizzare erythematosquamous, partially verrucose, crustly or eroded eruption developed in a 6-year-old boy one week after his first measles vaccination. The eruption regressed completely after a two-year clinical course. Histologically, the epidermis showed unique columnar eosinophilic degeneration. There was a dense, mononuclear cell infiltration in the upper part of the dermis. To our knowledge these clinical and histologic features have not been reported in the literature, although they resemble, in some aspects, Kyrle's disease, Mucha-Haberman's disease, or lichen planus verrucosus. Regarding the pathomechanisms underlying the development of this unique epidermal change, a postulate was made that it represented a special form of toxic epidermal reaction, probably resulting from autoagressive lymphoid cell response to epidermal cells. Furthermore, relationship of measles vaccination to this special response is suggested.
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10/12. Febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease.

    A patient with febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease manifested the characteristic features of this entity. These include a polymorphous eruption with histopathologic findings of Mucha-Habermann's disease, large ulceronecrotic skin lesions, intermittent high fever, and constitutional symptoms. The patient was unique in that he also had malabsorption and eosinophilia. This disease may represent a hypersensitivity reaction. To our knowledge, there are five previous cases of febrile ulceronecrotic Mucha-Habermann's disease reported in the world literature.
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