Cases reported "Placenta Accreta"

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11/21. Placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder.

    INTRODUCTION: Placenta percreta is a rare obstetric complication causing life-threatening hemorrhage. CASE REPORT: The case of a woman with a placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder treated by cesarean hysterectomy and partial bladder resection is presented. overall estimated blood loss was 11,130 ml, and 59 units of various blood products were transfused. CONCLUSION: Obstetricians and urologists should be aware of this rare condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
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12/21. Coping with placenta praevia and accreta in a DGH setting and words of caution.

    The incidence of placenta praevia and accreta has been increasing with rising caesarean section rates. We highlight the increasing incidence of severe post-partum haemorrhage due to placenta accreta. Four cases occurred within 3 years (2002--2004) in a small District General Hospital (DGH) with a delivery rate of 1,800 per year. All of the cases had previous caesarean sections and three had an associated anterior low-lying placenta. These patients were diagnosed to have placenta accreta in the third stage of labour, as the placenta was completely adherent and was difficult to remove. However, two of them had a provisional diagnosis made of placenta accreta and prophylactic measures had been taken in the form of counselling and consent for possible hysterectomy. patients were counselled regarding this condition, and the possible need for hysterectomy was discussed. Two of them had to be managed by post-partum hysterectomy and the other two were treated conservatively. The purpose of writing these case reports is to warn others of the need for vigilance, particularly in keeping their primary caesarean section rates down and being prepared for long-term complications.
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ranking = 0.049916851787012
keywords = haemorrhage
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13/21. Temporary balloon occlusion of the common iliac artery: new approach to bleeding control during cesarean hysterectomy for placenta percreta.

    A case of placenta percreta was referred at 31 weeks' gestation. We performed a cesarean hysterectomy preceded by placement of occlusive balloon catheters at bilateral common iliac arteries at 34 weeks' gestation. This simple and safe technique provides satisfactory efficacy for control of profuse bleeding during operation, with blood loss estimated at 800 mL.
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ranking = 1
keywords = blood loss
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14/21. abdominal pain and dysuria in pregnancy: urinary tract infection or life threatening haemorrhage?

    This report describes the case of a 27 year old woman presenting at 19 weeks' gestation with epigastric pain and dysuria. Initially diagnosed with a urinary tract infection, she re-presented 10 days later with acute abdominal pain and haemoperitoneum. The diagnosis of placenta percreta was not made until laparotomy. This case highlights placenta percreta as a rare but serious complication of pregnancy that may become increasingly frequent as the rates of caesarean delivery rise. early diagnosis, close monitoring, and prompt surgical management are essential as massive blood loss can occur. This can be challenging, as clinical presentation can be unusual.
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ranking = 1.199667407148
keywords = blood loss, haemorrhage
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15/21. Arterial embolus during common iliac balloon catheterization at cesarean hysterectomy.

    BACKGROUND: placenta accreta is associated with significant maternal morbidity. Prophylactic iliac artery balloon placement has been described as a treatment adjunct to minimize maternal risk of excessive blood loss at hysterectomy. CASE: A 37-year-old multigravida presented at 37 weeks of gestation with a known placenta previa and suspected placenta accreta. iliac artery balloon catheters were placed immediately before cesarean delivery. The balloons were inflated after the infant was delivered, and placental-site hemorrhage required a cesarean hysterectomy with a 1,500-mL blood loss. A left popliteal arterial thrombus diagnosed postoperatively required thromboembolectomy. The patient was discharged home on postoperative day 5 with no further sequelae. CONCLUSION: Prophylactic arterial balloon occlusion may be associated with risks unique to pregnant women.
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ranking = 2
keywords = blood loss
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16/21. A review of placenta accreta at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, scotland.

    There were 7 cases of placenta accreta (a frequency of 1 per 12,700 deliveries) at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital where emergency postpartum hysterectomies were performed on account of uncontrollable postpartum haemorrhage from January, 1977 to May, 1989. There was no maternal death. The presentation and risk factors are discussed.
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ranking = 0.049916851787012
keywords = haemorrhage
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17/21. Anaesthetic management of patients with placenta accreta.

    The management of a 28-year-old primigravida with placenta accreta diagnosed during Caesarean section is described. A hysterectomy was required to control massive haemorrhage, and the patient made a full recovery. The increased incidence of placenta accreta over the last three decades is thought to be associated with the concomitant increased frequency of Caesarean section, resulting in an increased incidence of placenta praevia (1.9 per cent to 3.9 per cent). patients with placenta praevia who have had a previous Caesarean section have a remarkably increased risk of placenta accreta. Management of placenta accreta is primarily by control of haemorrhage on delivery of the placenta. Control can be assisted by infrarenal cross-clamping of the aorta and/or intra-myometrial injection of prostaglandin F2 alpha which produces myometrial and vascular contraction. Identification of patients at increased risk, preparation for treatment and effective treatment of placenta accreta will minimize maternal morbidity and mortality.
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ranking = 0.099833703574023
keywords = haemorrhage
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18/21. Subtotal hysterectomy in emergency obstetrics.

    Emergency obstetric subtotal hysterectomy was performed in 11 women over a 20-year period in the University Central Hospital of Tampere. The incidence of these operations was 1 in 7,623 deliveries. During this period the incidence of uterine rupture was 1 in 13,976 deliveries. The other indications included placenta accreta, atonic postpartum haemorrhage and haemorrhage during caesarean section. There were no maternal deaths or major complications. The authors recommend safe subtotal hysterectomy operation of choice in these emergency cases.
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ranking = 0.099833703574023
keywords = haemorrhage
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19/21. Two cases of placenta accreta managed conservatively.

    placenta accreta is a rare complication of pregnancy. Traditionally treatment has been operative, commonly total abdominal hysterectomy, in order to prevent serious haemorrhage or infection. Reproductive function can, however, be preserved by conservative management which is possible in carefully selected cases without risking maternal welfare. We report two cases of placenta accreta managed conservatively--both women delivered after this treatment.
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ranking = 0.049916851787012
keywords = haemorrhage
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20/21. Placenta percreta: balloon occlusion and embolization of the internal iliac arteries to reduce intraoperative blood losses.

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a potential cause of maternal mortality and morbidity. Angiographic embolization techniques have been described in cases of postcesarean bleeding, vaginal wall hematomas, cervical ectopic pregnancies, and postpartum bleeding to control persistent bleeding from pelvic vessels. We describe two cases of pregnancy complicated with placenta percreta. balloon occlusion and embolization of the hypogastric arteries were performed during the cesarean section and hysterectomy, resulting in a remarkable reduction in intraoperative blood loss. balloon occlusion and embolization of the internal iliac arteries significantly reduce intraoperative blood losses.
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ranking = 6
keywords = blood loss
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