Cases reported "Placenta Accreta"

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1/3. Gravid uterus exteriorization at cesarean delivery for prenatally diagnosed placenta previa-accreta.

    Uterine exteriorization during fetal surgery permits hysterotomy away from anterior placental implantations. We employed this technique in two cesarean deliveries for anterior placenta previa-accreta, facilitating selective uterine incisions. Exteriorization of the near-term gravid uterus may be a useful adjunct to cesarean delivery for anterior placenta previa-accreta.
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keywords = hysterotomy
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2/3. abdominal pain and hemoperitoneum in the gravid patient: a case report of placenta percreta.

    A 24-year-old woman, G4P3 at 14 weeks gestation, presented to the ED with acute abdominal pain, hemoperitoneum, and fetal demise. Emergent laparotomy showed placenta percreta, requiring hysterotomy for delivery of the fetus and gestational sac followed by oversewing of the uterine defect. Although an uncommon occurrence, clinicians should consider placenta percreta in the gravid patient who presents with acute abdominal pain and shock.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hysterotomy
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3/3. Spontaneous rupture of a primigravid uterus secondary to placenta percreta. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: uterine rupture secondary to placenta percreta has been observed in multiparous patients. These cases are typically associated with a prior history of uterine trauma or infection: hysterotomy, myomectomy, cornual resection, dilatation and curettage, manual removal of the placenta or endometritis. Spontaneous rupture of the primigravid uterus without a history of trauma or infection is an exceedingly rare occurrence. This case represents the second reported in the medical literature and the first to result in a live-born infant. CASE: A 23-year-old, African American primigravida at 26 weeks' gestation presented with acute-onset abdominal pain, severe hypotension, tachycardia and fetal heart rate decelerations. blood product replacement was initiated, and an emergency laparotomy was performed for a presumptive diagnosis of intraabdominal hemorrhage. A significant hemoperitoneum was encountered, with the fetus floating freely in the peritoneal cavity. The uterus had a fundal rupture with a clinically apparent placenta percreta that necessitated performing a total abdominal hysterectomy. The patient recovered uneventfully, and the infant survived without significant morbidity. CONCLUSION: Spontaneous rupture of the primigravid uterus can occur in the absence of a history of uterine trauma or infection. If a gravid woman presents with hypotension, abdominal pain and fetal distress, the differential diagnosis should include rupture of the uterus, regardless of parity or gynecologic history. Rapid diagnosis, blood product replacement and emergency laparotomy are the key steps in successful management.
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ranking = 1
keywords = hysterotomy
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