Cases reported "Placenta Accreta"

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1/17. placenta accreta/increta. review of 10 cases and a case report.

    A review of the patients seen at the Department of obstetrics at Dokkyo University Hospital who had suffered placenta accreta/increta in the past 18 years, was performed. There were 10 such cases out of 9,716 deliveries during this period. This incidence is higher than that which has been reported in other Western countries. Forty percent of the patients in our study had placenta accreta/increta accompanied by placenta previa or low lying; 30% had had a prior cesarean section (C/S); 70% had previously experienced dilatation and curettage (D & C); 80% had previously undergone a C/S and/or D & C: and 40% had a history of miscarriage. Three of the ten patients with placenta accreta/increta required a hysterectomy; 2 patients were successfully treated with hemostatic stitches on the endometrium; and the remaining 5 mild cases were treated with removal of the placenta, either manually or with the use of forceps. There was no case of maternal death. In 2 cases, neonatal asphyxia was noted, but the neonate immediately recovered.
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ranking = 1
keywords = maternal death, death
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2/17. uterine inversion: a life-threatening obstetric emergency.

    BACKGROUND: Acute puerperal uterine inversion is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication in which the uterine fundus collapses within the endometrial cavity. Although the cause of uterine inversion is unclear, several predisposing factors have been described. maternal mortality is extremely high unless the condition is recognized and corrected. methods: medline was searched from 1966 to the present using the key phrase "uterine inversion." Nonpuerperal uterine inversion case reports were excluded from review except when providing information on classification and diagnostic techniques. A summarized case involving uterine inversion and a review of the classification, etiology, diagnosis, and management are reported. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although uncommon, if left unrecognized, uterine inversion will result in severe hemorrhage and shock, leading to maternal death. Manual manipulation should be attempted immediately to reverse the inversion. Tocolytics, such as magnesium sulfate and terbutaline, or halogenated anesthetics may be administered to relax the uterus to aid in reversal. Intravenous nitroglycerin provides an alternative to the tocolytics and offers several pharmacodynamic advantages. Treatment with hydrostatic pressure may be attempted while waiting for medications to be administered or for general anesthesia to be induced. In the most resistant of inversions, surgical correction might be required.
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ranking = 1
keywords = maternal death, death
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3/17. Transient myocardial ischemia may occur following subendometrial vasopressin infiltration.

    A case of transient myocardial ischemia following subendometrial vasopressin infiltration in intractable intra-operative postpartum bleeding due to placenta accreta is described. In our experience, the rate of this side effect is one in 14 patients (rate of 7.1%). We believe that the benefits of the treatment outweigh the risks, since the uterus was saved in all 14 patients. Nevertheless, this case emphasises that extreme precaution is needed with subendometrial vasopressin infiltration. It should be emphasised that the needle must not be within a blood vessel because intravascular injection of vasopressin solution can precipitate acute arterial hypertension, bradycardia and even death. We suggest that local vasopressin infiltration into the placental site is indicated in cases of intractable bleeding at cesarean section after other conventional obstetric and pharmacological maneuvers have failed.
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ranking = 0.00019997442821358
keywords = death
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4/17. placenta accreta associated with a ruptured pregnant rudimentary uterine horn. Case report and review of the literature.

    pregnancy in a rudimentary uterine horn is rare and is usually associated with fetal death and serious maternal morbidity and mortality. A case of pregnancy in a rudimentary uterine horn with rupture 14 weeks after last menstrual period and is complicated with placenta accreta is presented. The patient had signs and symptoms of massive hemoperitoneum. An emergency exploratory laparotomy revealed rupture of the gravid rudimentary horn of a bicornuate uterus. Histologic examination of the specimen showed that placenta was accreta. The relative literature is reviewed and the association of placenta accreta in such situations is pointed out.
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ranking = 0.00019997442821358
keywords = death
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5/17. Placenta increta/percreta associated with uterine perforation during therapy for fetal death. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: placenta accreta involves abnormal adherence of the placenta to the myometrium. Placenta increta and percreta are defined by the degree of trophoblastic penetration of the myometrium. These conditions are rarely observed in the first trimester; placenta increta and percreta are exceptionally infrequent. CASE: A woman had a uterine perforation after suction curettage for fetal death at 11 weeks' gestation, requiring hysterectomy for control of a profuse hemorrhage. Histopathologic examination of the uterus revealed placenta increta involving the lower uterine segment and placenta percreta at the site of uterine perforation. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of placenta percreta associated with uterine perforation during therapy for first-trimester fetal death.
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ranking = 0.0011998465692815
keywords = death
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6/17. Urologic complications of placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder: a case report and review of the literature.

    INTRODUCTION: Placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder may cause hemorrhagic shock, hematuria and urologic complications at parturition. This retrospective survey of 54 patients reviews maternal characteristics, presentations, urologic complications, and management. methods: The first reported case of placenta percreta with urinary bladder invasion in hawaii is presented. medline search and literature review identified an additional 53 patients. A meta-analysis of all 54 cases was performed. RESULTS: hematuria was present initially in 31% (17/54) patients. Of these, 9 of 17 required transfusion support. A preoperative diagnosis was established by ultrasound or MRI in 33% of patients. cystoscopy was performed in 12 patients and did not make a preoperative diagnosis in any patient. 39 urologic complications included bladder laceration 26%, urinary fistula 13%, gross hematuria 9%, ureteral transection 6%, and small capacity bladder 4%. Partial cystectomy was performed in 44% (24/54). Three maternal deaths and 14 fetal deaths occurred. Only 1 patient subsequently had a delivery. CONCLUSION: Readily identifiable risk factors by history are important to suggest placenta percreta in pregnant patients with gross hematuria. Ultrasound and/or MRI can establish a preoperative diagnosis. cystoscopy did not identify any patient preoperatively. Partial cystectomy is commonly required for extensive or deep bladder invasion.
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ranking = 1.0001999744282
keywords = maternal death, death
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7/17. placenta accreta and intrauterine fetal death in a woman with prior endometrial ablation: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Few cases of pregnancy following endometrial ablation have been reported. placenta accreta and poor perinatal outcome are potential risks due to underlying endometrial destruction and uterine scarring. CASE: A 41-year-old, white woman presented for initial prenatal care at 12 weeks, 3 years after endometrial ablation with resection of a leiomyoma. The patient's prenatal care was unremarkable until 20 weeks, when she presented with intrauterine fetal death. Labor was induced with misoprostol, and a stillborn fetus resulted. The placenta failed to deliver spontaneously after 6 hours and continuing doses of misoprostol. An attempt at manual extraction failed to demonstrate a clear cleavage plane between the placenta and endometrium. The patient underwent a hysterectomy for placenta accreta, which was confirmed on pathology. CONCLUSION: Endometrial ablation may predispose the patient to abnormal placentation and intrauterine fetal death. physicians should counsel their patients appropriately about the likelihood of this outcome.
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ranking = 0.0011998465692815
keywords = death
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8/17. placenta previa and accreta complicated by amniotic fluid embolism.

    BACKGROUND: The simultaneous occurrence of placenta previa and placenta accreta in patients who had previous low transverse cesarean delivery is presently well established. However, the sequence of previous cesarean delivery followed by placenta previa and accreta in a patient who also experiences a premature rupture of membranes as well as amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric phenomenon. CASE: A 24-year-old woman, para 2 with two previous cesarean deliveries, at 32 weeks' gestation by last menstrual period, was admitted with premature rupture of membranes. A repeat cesarean delivery (CD) was done. Excessive hemorrhage occurred, necessitating a hysterectomy. Also, the patient developed an amniotic fluid embolism. CONCLUSION: placenta previa and placenta accreta may be observed in patients who have a previous CD scar and in whom AFE develops suddenly and unexpectedly. AFE, a condition with complex pathogenesis, presents a number of challenges, with the patient undergoing serious complications that may include massive hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, and death. The obstetrician should be alert to the symptoms of AFE, and if they occur should begin prompt and aggressive treatment.
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ranking = 0.00019997442821358
keywords = death
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9/17. A review of placenta accreta at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, scotland.

    There were 7 cases of placenta accreta (a frequency of 1 per 12,700 deliveries) at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital where emergency postpartum hysterectomies were performed on account of uncontrollable postpartum haemorrhage from January, 1977 to May, 1989. There was no maternal death. The presentation and risk factors are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = maternal death, death
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10/17. placenta accreta, increta, and percreta. A survey of 40 cases.

    Forty patients with placenta accreta, increta, or percreta are presented. Clinical features revealed an average age of 29.5 years and an average parity of 3-2-1. Twenty-five had no antepartum complications. Nine were admitted with silent hemorrhage, of which 6 had a total placenta previa and 1 a low-lying previa. postpartum hemorrhage occurred in 39% with an associated perinatal mortality of 25% and 1 maternal death. Histopathologic evaluations revealed the predominant factor to be an absent decidua. Etiologic in decidual deficiency was a previous cesarean section (12 patients). Therapy consisted of total abdominal hysterectomy in 38 patients.
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ranking = 1
keywords = maternal death, death
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