Cases reported "Plant Poisoning"

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1/8. datura stramonium poisonings in humans.

    datura stramonium is a hallucinogenic plant which causes serious poisoning. Clinical symptoms are those of atropinic intoxication with psychiatric manifestations of dryness of mouth, mydriasis, tachycardia and hallucinations. diagnosis is essentially clinical. Treatment is symptomatic and suppurative; prognosis is usually favorable.
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2/8. Antimuscarinic intoxication resulting from the ingestion of moonflower seeds.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case in which ingestion of moonflower seeds resulted in antimuscarinic intoxication. CASE SUMMARY: An 18-year-old man was found at a local convenience store hallucinating and incoherent. Upon presentation to the emergency department, his signs and symptoms included tachycardia, confusion, dilated pupils, and dry, flushed, hot skin. He was admitted to the intensive care unit. hallucinations and symptoms resolved within 36-48 hours after hospitalization. The patient then reported that he had ingested moonflower seeds. He recovered and was released 4 days after admission. DISCUSSION: Based on the patient's description and clinical presentation, the moonflower seeds were believed to be Datura inoxia. This species of plant is similar to jimson weed, or datura stramonium. These plants are known to contain high concentrations of anticholinergic substances; ingestion can result in anticholinergic intoxication. signs and symptoms that commonly occur include hallucinations, tachycardia, dilated pupils, and disorientation. In our patient, use of the Naranjo probability scale indicated a possible relationship between the moonflower seed ingestion and the patient's signs and symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Ingestion of the Datura species can result in severe toxicity. Each plant varies in the concentrations of alkaloid substances. For this reason, it is very important for individuals to become educated on the toxicities and potential risks associated with recreational use of these plants.
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3/8. atropine intoxication from the ingestion and smoking of jimson weed (datura stramonium).

    Anticholinergic effects occur due to jimson weed intoxication. The most common intoxication involves teenagers desiring mind-altering properties from the plant. We report 4 cases of jimson weed intoxication due to ingestion and inhalation (smoking) of jimson weed. Clinicians should be aware of the potential abuse of botanicals such as jimson weed.
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4/8. datura stramonium: a fatal poisoning.

    A case report of death caused by ingestion of datura stramonium, also referred to as jimsonweed, thorn apple, or Jamestown weed, is presented. Mass spectral data on urine extracts of a 20-year-old male showed the molecular ions and principal fragment ions of scopolamine and atropine, present in datura stramonium.
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5/8. datura stramonium poisoning. Identification of tropane alkaloids in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    A case of acute poisoning by ingestion of datura stramonium infusion is reported. The patient presented with a typical anticholinergic syndrome (dryness of mouth, mydriasis, flushing, tachycardia, agitation, hallucinations) and was treated with symptomatic and supportive measures. The presence of tropane belladona alkaloids in a urine sample was demonstrated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.
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6/8. Jimson weed poisoning--texas, new york, and california, 1994.

    Ingestion of Jimson weed (datura stramonium), which contains the anticholinergics atropine and scopolamine, can cause serious illness or death. Sporadic incidents of intentional misuse have been reported throughout the united states, and clusters of poisonings have occurred among adolescents unaware of its potential adverse effects. This report describes incidents of Jimson weed poisoning that occurred in texas, new york, and california during June-November 1994.
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7/8. poisoning by the use of Datura leaves in a homemade toothpaste.

    datura stramonium and related species are relatively common causes of atropine-like poisoning by ingestion or inhalation. Toxic absorption after mucosal application is evident in 24 h of atropinism sustained by a woman who used a toothpaste mixed with the leaves and flowers of Datura sp., table salt, vinegar and an alcoholic beverage.
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8/8. The dangers of jimson weed and its abuse by teenagers in the Kanawha Valley of west virginia.

    Jimson weed (datura stramonium, a member of the Belladonna alkyloid family) is a plant growing naturally in west virginia and has been used as a home remedy since colonial times. Due to its easy availability and strong anticholinergic properties, teens are using Jimson weed as a drug. Plant parts can be brewed as a tea or chewed, and seed pods, commonly known as "pods" or "thorn apples," can be eaten. Side effects from ingesting jimson weed include tachycardia, dry mouth, dilated pupils, blurred vision, ballucinations, confusion, combative behavior, and difficulty urinating. Severe toxicity has been associated with coma and seizures, although death is rare. Treatment consists of activated charcoal and gastric lavage. Esmolol or other beta-blocker may be indicated to reduce severe sinus tachycardia. seizures, severe hypertension, severe hallucinations, and life-threatening arrhythmias are indicators for the use of the anticholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine. This article reviews the cases of nine teenagers who were treated in hospitals in the Kanawha Valley after ingesting jimson weed. We hope this article will help alert primary care physicians about the abuse of jimson weed and inform health officials about the need to educate teens about the dangers of this plant.
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