Cases reported "Plasmacytoma"

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1/200. poems syndrome: cicatricial alopecia as an unusual cutaneous manifestation associated with an underlying plasmacytoma.

    poems syndrome is a rare condition with cutaneous manifestations commonly including angiomas, hypertrichosis, hyperpigmentation, and thickening of the skin. We describe a male patient with a 2-year history of cervical lymphadenopathy, erythematous thickening of the skin on the neck, and progressive walking difficulties. The patient had an occipital erythema with scarring alopecia and sparse follicular pustules at the edge of the lesion. Further investigation revealed symmetric polyneuropathy, hepatosplenomegaly, monoclonal gammopathy, subclinical thyreopathy, and an osteolytic bone lesion of the skull. Histologically, a plasmacytoma with lambda cell restriction was found. The overlying skin showed marked fibrosis, with loss of hair follicles, and a plasma cell infiltrate of polyclonal origin. The cervical lymph nodes showed histologic characteristics of multicentric Castleman's disease, and the skin of the neck showed thickening and vasoproliferation. There was no evidence of further plamacytomas. After excision of the plasmacytoma and postoperative irradiation, the symptoms gradually resolved within a few months. A cicatricial lesion remained on the occiput without further folliculitis or hair loss on the rest of the scalp. This case illustrates the reactive character of poems syndrome as a paraneoplastic syndrome in myeloma patients.
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2/200. polyradiculoneuropathy revealing a solitary plasmacytoma of the ilium. A new case-report.

    Neurological manifestations are uncommon in myeloma patients, and subacute polyradiculoneuropathy as the inaugural manifestations of solitary plasmacytoma of bone is exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who was evaluated for a three-month history of flaccid tetraplegia with a gradually ascending onset and for a deterioration in general health. electromyography findings were consistent with polyradiculoneuropathy. Laboratory tests showed a moderate amount of a monoclonal IgG-lambda antibody. Findings were normal from a radiographic bone survey and a radionuclide bone scan. Computed tomography of the pelvis disclosed a solitary osteolytic lesion in the right iliac crest, which was found upon biopsy to be a malignant plasmacytoma. radiation therapy and chemotherapy were given. Subacute or chronic polyradiculoneuropathy as the inaugural manifestation of solitary plasmacytoma is exceedingly rare and should be distinguished from the sensorimotor polyneuropathy produced by plasma cell infiltration in some multiple myeloma patients. The polyradiculoneuropathy of solitary plasmacytoma can be likened to the neuropathies seen in some forms of multiple myeloma (sclerotic myeloma and poems syndrome). The pathophysiology of these neuropathies remains obscure. The case reported here suggests that patients with unexplained lasting polyradiculoneuropathy should be investigated for a plasma cell proliferation even if they have no serum monoclonal component. Because plasmacytomas are painless, imaging studies are needed for their diagnosis. The management of the neuropathy consists in treatment of the tumor.
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3/200. Reconstruction of the hip abductors after resection of the proximal femur.

    Three patients with malignant bone tumors of the proximal femur underwent implantation of an endoprosthesis with reconstruction of the joint capsule and hip abductors using artificial mesh.
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4/200. Primary gastric plasmacytoma: a rare cause of hypertrophic gastritis in an adolescent.

    BACKGROUND: This report describes a 16-year-old patient with gastric rugal hypertrophy caused by a primary gastric plasmacytoma. She had a 3-month history of nausea and burning abdominal pain. Radiographic studies showed giant rugal hypertrophy. Superficial endoscopic gastric biopsies showed mild inflammation with plasma cells of polyclonal origin in the mucosa. When symptoms persisted, she underwent laparoscopic full-thickness gastric biopsy. There was monoclonal plasma cell infiltration histologically diagnostic of plasmacytoma and inconsistent with helicobacter pylori-associated mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. There was no evidence for involvement of the bone marrow or regional lymph nodes. The tumor did not respond to radiotherapy, necessitating total gastrectomy. methods: blood samples were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-6 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gastric biopsy and gastrectomy specimens were subjected to immunophenotyping for kappa and lambda light chains, CD45, CD20, and LN1 and to polymerase chain reaction analysis for herpes virus HHV8. RESULTS: There was no elevation in circulating IL-6 levels, militating against a pathogenesis akin to that of Castleman's disease. There was no evidence for infection with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus HHV8, which has recently been found in patients with multiple myeloma. CONCLUSIONS: This diagnosis and the characteristics of the tumor are very unusual, if not unique, for a patient of this age. The diagnostic evaluation of this patient also demonstrates the importance of deep endoscopic or full-thickness biopsies in some children with hypertrophic gastritis.
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5/200. Metastatic cutaneous plasmacytoma: a case report associated with IgA lambda multiple myeloma and a review of the literature of metastatic cutaneous plasmacytomas associated with multiple myeloma and primary cutaneous plasmacytomas.

    We present the case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with immunoglobulin a lambda (IgA lambda) multiple myeloma (MM). She had firm nodular cutaneous lesions on the trunk and scalp without adjacent bone involvement. The patient was diagnosed as having IgA lambda MM of stage IIIA with 52% plasmacytosis in the bone marrow six months before the appearance of the cutaneous lesions. The abnormal plasma cells showed moderate to marked dysplasia in both the bone marrow and skin lesions. The abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow exhibited abnormal karyotypes: 41, XX, der (1) t (1p; 1q), -4, -10, -14, -16, -17, 17p , that differed from the "unfavorable" karyotype reported previously. We reviewed the cases of metastatic cutaneous plasmacytoma in MM and cases of primary cutaneous plasmacytoma that have been reported in English or Japanese and identified the Ig class. Among the 83 cases of metastatic cutaneous plasmacytomas in MM, IgG, IgA, IgD, and Bence-Jones protein were found in 52%, 23%, 16%, and 6%, respectively. A disproportionately high frequency of IgD lambda MM was found to have spread to the skin, compared with the frequency of IgD MM itself, which was present in only around 2% of the MM cases. Among the 18 primary cutaneous plasmacytomas, IgG, IgA, and Bence-Jones protein were found in 56%, 11%, and 17%, respectively, but no IgD was found.
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6/200. Primary plasmacytoma of lymph nodes. A case report.

    Most plasmacytomas of lymph nodes are secondary metastases from myeloma or from primary plasmacytoma of the upper air passages. Primary plasmacytomas of lymph nodes are very rare. A case of primary plasmacytoma of mediastinal, cervical and para-aortic lymph nodes is reported. Bence Jones proteinuria of 8 g/24 h was present. Repeated bone marrow examinations were normal. When the patient died, 17 months after the first symptoms, the bone marrow was still not involved.
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7/200. Solitary bone plasmacytoma: management of isolated local relapse following radiotherapy.

    radiotherapy is the prime treatment modality for solitary plasmacytomas of bone (SPB). Although local control rates are excellent, progression to multiple myeloma is frequent, albeit with varying latency. Local failure in the absence of dissemination is rare and thus management is poorly documented. We discuss such a patient who presented 3 years after local radiation for a pelvic SPB and review the relevant literature. radiation doses, portals employed and prognostic factors that may predict progression to myeloma are discussed. This report shows that an isolated recurrence of SPB in a previously irradiated field was successfully treated with orthopaedic surgery. This resulted in good pain relief and mobility for the patient, who remains free of disease 6 months after operation.
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keywords = bone
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8/200. Primary eyelid plasmacytoma.

    We report a case of eyelid plasmacytoma. The patient presented with a superficial lesion on the upper left eyelid, 10x7 mm in size. Histological and immunohistochemical findings were indicative of plasmacytoma with slightly abnormal sub-epidermic plasma cell infiltrates. Immunoperoxidase staining was strongly positive for intracytoplasmic kappa light chains. No infiltration by atypical plasma cells could be documented in the bone marrow biopsy and aspirate. Skeletal survey showed no osteolytic lesions or osteoporosis. The tumor on the left eyelid was surgically removed. No radiotherapy was administered.
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9/200. Radiographic findings for solitary plasmacytoma of the bone in the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus: A case report.

    Radiographic findings for a solitary plasmacytoma of the anterior wall of the maxillary sinus are reported. The diagnostic evaluation for this disease is discussed through use of plain images, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The treatment selected was radiation therapy combined with chemotherapy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bone destruction, though this was not apparent on plain images. T(1)-weighted magnetic resonance images showed similar or high signal intensity relative to muscle; T(2)-weighted images showed hyperintensity.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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10/200. A surgical case of solitary plasmacytoma of rib origin with biclonal gammopathy.

    Localized solitary plasmacytoma of the bone (SPB) is a rare disease and is characterized by only one or two isolated bone lesions with no evidence of disease dissemination. A previously healthy 44-year-old male was admitted for evaluation of an abnormal radiographic shadow in the left middle lung field with symptoms of left back pain. Radiological evaluation revealed a peripheral opacity in the left chest wall, which was highly suspected to be a chest wall tumor. CT-guided transcutaneous needle biopsy of the tumor was performed and the specimens showed a monomorphous population of mature plasma cells. The bone marrow biopsy findings revealed no evidence of myeloma and bone scanning revealed only abnormal accumulation in the left seventh rib. He had mild M-proteins in a urine sample and Bence-Jones protein was detected. immunoelectrophoresis revealed mild biclonal gammopathy of Bence-Jones protein of both the kappa and lambda light-chain types. Under a diagnosis of solitary bone plasmacytoma, preoperative radiation therapy with doses of 40 Gy for the tumor was performed. He underwent complete en bloc resection of the chest wall, including one-third of the left sixth and seventh ribs, the intercostal muscle and the parietal pleura. The protein abnormalities in the urine sample disappeared following surgical resection. Adjuvant chemotherapy using melphalan and prednisolone was performed. He is doing well without evidence of tumor recurrence 2 years following his initial diagnosis.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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