Cases reported "Pleural Diseases"

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1/113. Overdose of tetracycline for pleurodesis leading to chemical burns of the pleura.

    Chemical pleurodesis using tetracycline is an accepted and commonly employed treatment of pneumothorax and pleural effusions. We describe a case of chemical burn of the pleura in a ventilated 41-year-old who came to thoracotomy after 3 days of continuous intrapleural infusion of tetracycline at another hospital. To our knowledge this has not been previously reported although other adverse effects of this procedure are documented. We suggest that damage to the pleura and underlying lung may occur if excessive amounts of tetracycline are used in attempted pleurodesis.
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keywords = effusion
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2/113. Pancreaticopleural fistula: diagnosis with magnetic resonance pancreatography.

    Pancreaticopleural fistula secondary to chronic pancreatitis is a rare cause of recurrent pleural effusion. The demonstration of the fistula with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and CT is invasive or limited. We report in two patients the use of magnetic resonance pancreatography as a noninvasive alternative to endoscopic retrograde pancreatography for the diagnosis of pancreaticopleural fistula.
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keywords = effusion
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3/113. Pleural amyloidosis in a patient with intractable pleural effusion and multiple myeloma.

    Pleural involvement of systemic amyloidosis has been rarely reported. We report a case with multiple myeloma presenting an intractable right pleural effusion, in which pleural amyloidosis was diagnosed through pleural biopsy using a Cope needle. The diagnosis of pleural amyloidosis is important, because its refractory pleural effusion should be treated with pleurodesis. Since closed pleural biopsy using a Cope needle is much less invasive than thoracoscopy, the former should be attempted first whenever pleural amyloidosis is suspected.
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keywords = effusion
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4/113. Subpleural lung involvement in Behcet's disease: first localization of a systemic entity.

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic multisystem vasculitis, affecting many organs and the vascular system, of unknown aetiology. Eyes, skin, joints, the oral cavity, the central nervous system, and, less frequently, heart, lung, kidney, the genital system and the gastrointestinal tract can be involved. Intrathoracic manifestations of BD consist mainly of thromboembolism of the superior vena cava and/or other mediastinal veins; aneurysms of the aorta and pulmonary arteries; pulmonary infarct and haemorrhage; pleural effusion; and, rarely, myocardial and/or hilar lymphoid involvement. In the present case, the patient presented with BD with an asymptomatic subpleural lung mass and bilateral pulmonary artery enlargement. The patient was treated with a combination of surgical and medical therapy with complete resolution of the lung involvement and without any parenchymal relapses after an 8-month follow-up.
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keywords = effusion
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5/113. churg-strauss syndrome with pleural involvement.

    A 51-year-old Japanese man with churg-strauss syndrome (CSS) diagnosed by pleural biopsy is described. He was hospitalized because of high fever and bilateral knee, elbow and shoulder joint pain. Chest roentgenogram and chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed bilateral massive pleural effusion. Pleural biopsy revealed eosinophilic infiltration and necrotizing granulomas. He was treated with oral prednisolone and his symptoms improved. This is the first report of CSS diagnosed by pleural biopsy.
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keywords = effusion
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6/113. Left hepatic duct injury and thoracobiliary fistula after abdominal blunt trauma.

    Thoracobiliary fistula after blunt hepatic trauma is rare. We report a case of pleurobiliary fistula after a blunt hepatic trauma leading to a left hepatic lobe laceration together with a left hepatic duct injury. The management of this traumatic lesion is discussed and related to the existing literature data. The diagnosis of traumatic thoracobiliary fistula rests upon clinical suspicion in the setting of a persistent right pleural effusion. Demonstration of the presence of bile in the pleural cavity by thoracocentesis is considered a proof of pleural biliary fistula. We think that laparotomy is an appropriate route for the treatment of pleurobiliary fistulas. However, when a bronchobiliary fistula is suspected, the patient should be treated with thoracotomy and may require pulmonary resection to remove the fistulous tracts.
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keywords = effusion
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7/113. Pleural posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following liver transplantation.

    A case of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) involving the pleura is reported. The patient was a 57-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation 2 years prior to the development of PTLD. The PTLD was pleural-based and was first detected by radiologic studies as a pleural effusion. Transbronchial biopsy and cytologic examination of 2 pleural fluid specimens were nondiagnostic. Subsequent open-wedge biopsy revealed a monomorphic PTLD, composed of large immunoblasts with plasmacytoid differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated B-cell lineage with expression of monotypic cytoplasmic immunoglobulin kappa light chain and CD79a, and absence of T-cell antigens. Immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated Epstein-Barr virus protein and rna, respectively. No evidence of human herpesvirus 8 dna was detected by polymerase chain reaction. We report this case because pleural-based PTLD is rare. The diagnosis of this entity is made more difficult by the fact that PTLD is often underrepresented in pleural fluid cytology samples.
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keywords = effusion
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8/113. Pleuropulmonary disease due to pergolide use for restless legs syndrome.

    pergolide is an ergot-derived dopamine agonist used in Parkinson's disease and, increasingly, in restless legs syndrome. We report a patient with a 2.5-year history of weight loss, pleuropulmonary fibrosis, and exudative pleural effusion that developed insidiously while taking this medication. The extensive and invasive workup that preceded the diagnosis highlights the difficulty in attributing such a process to a drug reaction. This is the second report of such a reaction to pergolide, which is one of the increasing number of ergot-derived compounds in common clinical use.
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keywords = effusion
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9/113. Multiple pleural nodules without effusion--a rare presentation of tuberculous pleurisy.

    We report a rare case of tuberculous pleurisy presenting with multiple pleural nodules without associated effusion or parenchymal lung lesions. A 62-year-old man had multiple discrete pleural nodules in the right hemithorax on chest radiography without any clinical symptoms. Thoracoscopic biopsy of the pleural nodules revealed a caseous granuloma with acid-fast bacilli. The patient received antituberculous therapy, with resolution of tuberculomas on chest film within 2 months. To our knowledge, only two similar cases have been previously reported in the English literature, and our observation should lead to broadening of the spectrum of the differential diagnosis of multiple pleural nodules.
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ranking = 5
keywords = effusion
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10/113. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome resembling pulmonary embolism.

    A 32-year-old infertility patient with a previous diagnosis of stage IV endometriosis experienced shortness of breath and chest pain. She was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism by spiral volumetric computed tomography (SVCT) and anticoagulated during hospitalization, although no history of thrombosis was ever identified. She continued to have intermittent symptoms of chest pain, back pain, and shortness of breath for the next 1.5 months. Repeat SVCT revealed a large, right-sided pleural effusion with associated consolidation but no evidence of pulmonary embolism. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, a thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was performed and showed thoracic endometriosis involving the pleura. The patient desired to retain her fertility and opted for treatment with depot medroxyprogesterone. She has been asymptomatic for 2 years with this treatment. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing thoracic endometriosis syndrome and the difficulty diagnosing this condition considering its nonspecific features.
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ranking = 1
keywords = effusion
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