Cases reported "Pleural Diseases"

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1/18. nitric oxide and high frequency jet ventilation in a patient with bilateral bronchopleural fistulae and ARDS.

    PURPOSE: To describe a method of delivering nitric oxide during high frequency jet ventilation. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 63-yr-old man underwent reduction pneumoplasty for bullous emphysema. Postoperatively, ventilation was inadequate, secondary to bilateral high output bronchopleural fistulae. High frequency jet ventilation was initiated and achieved adequate ventilation (pH>7.2). Over the following 24 hr, progressive hypoxemia (SaO2 <86%) developed along with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. nitric oxide was delivered by continuous flow at the patient Y-connector during combined high frequency jet and conventional ventilation (two conventional low volume breaths/minute). Substantial improvement in oxygenation (FiO2 0.8 0.5, SaO2 >92%) was noted initially and was sustained over 72 hr. Subsequently, the patient was weaned to conventional ventilation without difficulty. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued on postoperative day sixteen. CONCLUSION: The simultaneous use of nitric oxide and high-frequency jet ventilation was used safely and effectively in this patient as a method of support for acute respiratory distress syndrome with co-existing large bilateral bronchopleural fistulae.
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ranking = 1
keywords = high frequency, frequency
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2/18. Management of tension pneumatocele with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    We report the successful application of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in a patient with tension pneumatocele (TP). The proposed check-valve mechanism for the development of pneumatoceles predicts that positive-pressure ventilation could lead to distension of these airspaces and formation of TPs. Therefore, high-frequency ventilation could be more applicable in conditions, such as massive air leak due to bronchopleural fistula, that are difficult to manage by conventional ventilator modes.
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ranking = 0.0020423264740879
keywords = frequency
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3/18. Lobar bronchial blockade in bronchopleural fistula.

    A 59-yr-old man with bullous lung disease developed a refractory bronchopleural fistula involving the right upper lobe. Despite independent lung and high-frequency jet ventilation, a large air leak persisted. Following the introduction of a bronchial blocker into the right upper lobe bronchus via the tracheal lumen of a left-sided endobronchial tube, oxygenation and ventilation improved, and the airleak was reduced by 90%. The presence of pneumonia led to an inexorably downhill course with death from overwhelming sepsis.
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ranking = 0.00034038774568132
keywords = frequency
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4/18. Biliary pleural fistula as a complication of radiofrequency ablation for liver metastasis.

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) recently emerged as an efficient and safe local ablative method to treat unresecable liver tumours. Currently however, the full spectrum of potential complications of RFA remains undetermined. We report a case of severe biliary complication, associating main bile duct stricture and biliary pleural fistula, arising after extensive RFA for unresectable liver metastasis of central location. Treatment consisted of external drainage of the pleural effusion and internal endoscopic drainage via a biliary stenting. This description of a life-threatening complication emphazises the need to better knowledge of the contraindications of RFA, particularly for the treatment of large tumours at proximity of main bile ducts.
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ranking = 0.0017019387284066
keywords = frequency
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5/18. Endobronchial closure of a postpneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula.

    Successful permanent endobronchial closure of a serious postpneumonectomy bronchopleural fistula is reported in a patient with a delayed diagnosis of mycobacterium fortuitum-cheloni infection. Increasing experience, improved plugging agents, and a review of the literature suggest that in selected patients, this procedure can avoid complex repeat operations and reverse life-threatening situations. Although atypical mycobacterial infections occur with infrequency, they are difficult to treat and may lead, as in this patient, to a misdiagnosis. Operations on granulomatous tissues are prone to heal poorly, thus inviting tissue breakdown and chronic fistulas.
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ranking = 0.00034038774568132
keywords = frequency
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6/18. Silicone thorax due to a ruptured breast implant.

    A woman with a history of bilateral mastectomy and silicone implants for fibrocystic disease and a history of atrial septal defect repair presented with pleural nodules on a chest radiograph. A thorascopic biopsy performed for possible mesothelioma demonstrated chronic inflammation and focal pleural fibrosis due to a foreign-body reaction secondary to silicone. This was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive radiograph elemental analysis. As the population ages, the increasing frequency of ruptured silicone implants and the need for heart surgery may result in a corresponding increase in the risk for fibrothorax secondary to inadvertent silicone introduction during surgery.
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ranking = 0.00034038774568132
keywords = frequency
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7/18. Successful management of ARDS with bronchopleural fistula secondary to miliary tuberculosis using a conventional ventilator.

    Most institutions in india and other developing countries do not have facilities for high frequency ventilation in adults. We report the successful management of a case of ARDS with bronchopleural fistula secondary to miliary tuberculosis using a conventional ventilator and early empiric anti-tubercular therapy.
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ranking = 0.16655320408477
keywords = high frequency, frequency
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8/18. Management of malignant air leak in a child with a neonatal high-frequency oscillatory ventilator.

    A 10-year-old, 36-kg child with a malignant air leak who failed conventional mechanical ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation was successfully treated with a neonatal high-frequency oscillatory ventilator for 31 days. Since the air leak resolved with minimal hemodynamic compromise, this technique may have application in the management of respiratory failure and air leak in the older and larger child for prolonged periods of time.
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ranking = 0.0020423264740879
keywords = frequency
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9/18. The use of combined high-frequency jet ventilation and intermittent positive pressure ventilation in bilateral bronchopleural fistulae.

    Dissatisfaction with the results of conventional respiratory support has led to the use of high-frequency jet ventilation in desperate clinical situations with severe acute respiratory failure. We report a case of a 77 year old man with bilateral bronchopleural fistulae, who was ventilated with a combination of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation. The hemodynamic and respiratory advances of this combination are discussed in an overview of the literature.
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ranking = 0.0020423264740879
keywords = frequency
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10/18. Gas flow through a bronchopleural fistula. Measuring the effects of high-frequency jet ventilation and chest-tube suction.

    high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is FDA-approved for ventilating patients with bronchopleural fistulae (BPF), yet little is known about its effect on the fistula airleak. We quantitated a patient's BPF airleak during both conventional volume-cycled ventilation and HFJV. The effect of chest-tube suction (CTS) on BPF flow was also studied. Despite a significant reduction in peak airway pressure, the HFJV resulted in a 50-70 percent increase in BPF flow. CTS also significantly increased the airleak. HFJV may not always be the preferential method for ventilating patients with BPF and we recommend measuring the fistula airleak when attempting to optimize a patient's ventilatory parameters.
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ranking = 0.0017019387284066
keywords = frequency
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