Cases reported "Pleural Effusion"

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1/4. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of mastitis secondary to empyema necessitatis. A report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: empyema necessitatis is a relatively rare entity. Two instances of mastitis secondary to empyema necessitatis, diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy are reported. CASES: One case was tuberculous in etiology and was initially recognized by cytologic findings of epithelioid and granulomatous cellular reactions and the presence of acid-fast bacilli, which were subsequently cultured and speciated as mycobacterium tuberculosis. The other case was due to coexisting actinomyces and actinobacillus. These organisms were cytologically suggested by "sulfur" granules of filamentous, gram-positive bacilli, admixed gram-negative coccobacilli and Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon in an exudative cell background and were confirmed by microbiologic culture as actinomyces israelii and Astinomyces actinomycetemcomitans, respectively. CONCLUSION: The usefulness of fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of empyema necessitatis, supported by ancillary microbial culture, histochemistry, and radiographic imaging, is well illustrated by these two cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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2/4. ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection due to serratia marcescens.

    serratia marcescens is an opportunistic Gram-negative bacillus that is most often associated with infections of the respiratory tract, urinary tract, wounds, and bloodstream. Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) with this pathogen are exceedingly infrequent. Even more rare is the association of S. marcescens with infections of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunts. To the best of our knowledge, we describe in this report not only the first case of a VP shunt infection by S. marcescens in an adult, but also the first case of a VP shunt infection by this organism in the absence of bowel perforation.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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3/4. pleural effusion and anicteric hepatitis associated with cat-scratch disease. documentation by cat-scratch bacillus.

    Prior to the discovery of the coccobacillus in the lymph nodes of patients with cat-scratch disease by Wear and associates, the diagnosis was based on clinical findings and a nonstandardized skin test. Atypical cases either remained an enigma or were questioned as to accuracy of diagnosis. We present here a case of cat-scratch disease associated with pleural effusion, anicteric hepatitis, and other systemic manifestations confirmed by identification of the coccobacillus. It is the first association with a pleural effusion. With the Warthin-Starry stain, we anticipate a redefinition of this disease. The confirmation of atypical cases will help broaden the clinical spectrum, as well as guide us to consider this diagnosis where its classic manifestations may be absent.
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ranking = 6
keywords = bacillus
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4/4. Pathogenicity of eikenella corrodens in humans.

    eikenella corrodens is resident flora of the normal adult human oral cavity. Four cases of verified infection and previous case reports of infections caused by this organism were reviewed and analyzed. Rarely has this bacillus been found as the sole isolate to initiate infection in the host with normal immune status. In the immunocompromised host, this organism was observed as the sole isolate in cases of persistent empyemas and/or overwhelming pneumonias with bacteremias. The potential of the organism singly to perpetuate an established infection appears real. In the immunocompromised patients such potentials are accentuated and can result in fulminant pulmonary infections and death. The finding of E corrodens in an infection site of a compromised patient should indicate specific therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
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