Cases reported "Pleural Neoplasms"

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11/103. Malignant vascular tumours of the pleura in "asbestos" workers and endothelial differentiation in malignant mesothelioma.

    BACKGROUND: Three cases of diffuse malignant vascular tumours of the pleura are described which mimicked malignant mesothelioma clinically and pathologically (so called "pseudomesothelioma"). All had occupational histories of exposure to asbestos. The relationship of these tumours to mesothelioma and asbestos exposure is discussed. methods: To examine the histogenetic relationship between mesothelioma and these three tumours an immunohistochemical analysis of vascular marker (CD31, CD34, and von willebrand factor) expression was undertaken in 92 cases of pleural mesothelioma, in addition to these three tumours. Electron microscopic fibre analysis of lung tissue was performed on each of the three cases to assess asbestos fibre content. RESULTS: Diffuse pleural epithelioid haemangioendotheliomas may closely resemble malignant mesothelioma clinically and pathologically but, of the 92 pleural mesotheliomas tested, none showed expression of CD31, CD34, and von willebrand factor. Although all three cases had claimed exposure to asbestos, ferruginous bodies typical of asbestos were only seen by light microscopy in case 2, and only in this subject was the asbestos fibre content raised in comparison with the range seen in a non-exposed background population. The latent period in the pleural epithelioid haemangioendotheliomas ranged from 18 to 60 years. CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial differentiation does not appear to occur in mesothelioma and therefore should be clearly separated from it. No definite association between pleural epithelioid haemangioendothelioma and exposure to asbestos can be made from this small series but further investigation is warranted.
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keywords = exposure
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12/103. Unusually high incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma in a town of eastern sicily: an epidemiological and environmental study.

    In a recent epidemiological study, researchers investigated mortality from malignant pleural neoplasms in italy, and they detected some geographic clusters of cases of this disease. We found a town located in a volcanic area of eastern sicily to be of special interest. The residents, some of whom were diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma, had never had any relevant exposure to asbestos during their professional lives. The results of an environmental survey suggested that a possible cause of asbestos exposure was the stone quarries near the town. The products of the quarries contain fibrous amphiboles, which are used widely in the local building industry. These fibrous amphiboles were identified as intermediate phases between tremolite and actinolite. Samples were collected from buildings in the town, and concentrations of amphibole fibers were evaluated. Fibrous phases were detected in 71% of the samples, and fiber concentrations ranged from a few thousand to more than 4 x 10(4) fibers/mg of material. In addition, we conducted a study on the mineral fiber lung burden in a pleural mesothelioma case. Many mineral fibers that were classified as the same tremolite-actinolite fibrous amphibole found in the quarries and in the building materials were detected in the lung tissue. The results suggest that the inhabitants of the town we studied had been exposed for several decades to asbestos fibers that were present in the material extracted from the local stone quarries. The material was subsequently used in the building industry, and this has caused an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma in the area.
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13/103. Pleural mesothelioma associated with indoor pollution of asbestos.

    This case report concerns a 46-year-old woman, dying from histologically confirmed diffuse malignant mesothelioma after asbestos exposure, which was only caused by indoor pollution from crocidolite-containing spray asbestos in building materials. There was no other known occupational or environmental asbestos exposure during her life. The lung tissue fibre analysis by light microscopy showed significantly increased concentrations of ferruginous bodies (3162 FB per gram of wet lung tissue). By use of scanning transmission electron microscopy, clearly increased concentrations of amphibole fibres (8.6 x 10(6) fibres longer than 1 microm and 0.6 x 10(6) fibres longer than > or =5 microm per gram dry tissue), mainly classified as crocidolite, were observed. The disease was attributed to indoor exposure to sprayed asbestos, which occurred during her work as a decorator in the studio of a warehouse.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = exposure
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14/103. Nodular thickening of interlobar fissures: an early manifestation of malignant mesothelioma: a case report.

    Two men with occupational exposure to asbestos were admitted to our hospital with minute pleural changes on their chest CT image. Conventional computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest showed slightly thickened interlobar fissures and a small amount of pleural effusion. In addition, high-resolution CT showed small nodular opacities on interlobar fissures. There were no intrapulmonary mass shadows, pleural plaques or other extrapulmonary mass shadows. These roentgenographical findings were very similar to each other. Hyarulonic acid values obtained from their pleural fluid were extremely high. Finally, we diagnosed them as having malignant mesothelioma using an immunocytochemical technique and electronmicroscopy. We conclude that HRCT is helpful in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, particularly in its early manifestation such as nodular opacities of interlobar fissures.
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ranking = 23.334533089844
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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15/103. Localised spontaneous regression in mesothelioma -- possible immunological mechanism.

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumor usually associated with asbestos exposure. Although it can remain stable for prolonged periods, it has not been described to spontaneously regress. MM tumors are thought to be immunogenic based both on animal studies and on the good responses in some humans treated with immunotherapy. Here we present a case of pleural MM in which a transient spontaneous regression was associated with tumor tissue infiltration with mononuclear cells and serological evidence of anti-MM reactivity. The patient's tumor eventually progressed and with this progression there was evidence of loss of serological reactivity to some, but not all, of her MM antigens. The patient survived for 20 months and, in contrast to her initial biopsy, no significant lymphoid infiltrate was detected in her MM tissue at post mortem examination.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = exposure
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16/103. Malignant mesothelioma from neighborhood exposure to anthophyllite asbestos.

    BACKGROUND: Anthophyllite asbestos has been reported to cause asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, and pleural plaques in occupationally exposed workers. Anthophyllite has also been associated with pleural plaques in finland and japan among those who live near mines and mills and have neighborhood or environmental exposure. methods: We evaluated a 38-year-old patient with pleural mesothelioma who lived, attended school, and delivered newspapers near a manufacturing facility that used exclusively anthophyllite asbestos fiber from ages 8-17 years. He had no work exposure to asbestos. RESULTS: The pleural mesothelioma was an epithelial type with tubulopapillary structures and was treated with an extrapleural pneumonectomy followed by radiation therapy. The malignant cells were positive by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin but negative for carcinoembryonic antigen, S100, B72.3, and leu M1 antigen. Anthophyllite fibers were > 5 microm in length in lung tissue compared to 3 microm from a general population study. CONCLUSIONS: Anthophyllite asbestos has been associated with neighborhood environmental exposure and pleural plaques; we now report a neighborhood exposure and pleural mesothelioma.
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17/103. Localized malignant mesothelioma of the pleura.

    We describe a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma appearing as a solitary pleural tumor in a 56-year-old Japanese man with no history of exposure to asbestos. A chest radiograph revealed an isolated extrapulmonary mass in the left hemithorax. The patient underwent tumor resection, but the tumor later recurred on the contralateral pleura. The patient developed cerebral metastases and died 16 months after the initial surgery. The resected tumor was sessile with broad-based pleural attachment. Microscopically, the tumor was composed of interlacing fascicles of plump spindle cells intermixed with few polygonal cells. Most of the tumor cells showed positive immunoreactivity for cytokeratins (AE1 and AE3) and vimentin. Many of the tumor cells were positive for epithelial membrane antigen, and a few were positive for desmin. In contrast, the tumor cells were consistently negative for carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial antigen BerEP4, calretinin, S-100 protein, neuron-specific enolase, muscle actin antigen HHF35, alpha-smooth muscle actin antigen and CD34. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells had diffusely distributed cytoplasmic intermediate filaments, desmosome-like junctions, and a few microvilli. Some tumor cells contained cytoplasmic tonofilaments. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings supported the mesothelial nature of the tumor, and led us to diagnose this tumor as a sarcomatoid localized malignant mesothelioma.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = exposure
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18/103. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in bakers and pastry cooks.

    BACKGROUND: The occurrence of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) among bakers and pastry cooks has never been documented. case reports: We detected eight cases of MPM in bakers, pastry cooks, and biscuit cooks engaged in making, baking/cooking, and selling pastry/bread in two hospital-based series (rome and Orbassano/Turin, italy; period 1990-1997; 222 cases). Field-investigations revealed asbestos-containing material (ACM) in ovens for baking bread, that were manufactured prior to the 1980s. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that there is a possible new association of the risk of having worked as a baker or pastry cook and MPM. Presumptive source of exposure to asbestos was the use of asbestos-insulated ovens.
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ranking = 0.25
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19/103. Malignant pleural mesothelioma following chemotherapy for breast cancer.

    Although the induction of malignant mesothelioma by radiotherapy, used alone or in combination with chemotherapy, has been previously reported in the literature, the number of documented cases is extremely small. We report a case of malignant pleural mesothelioma arising four years after chemotherapy for breast cancer in a 42-year-old woman without a history of exposure to asbestos. To our knowledge, this is the f rst reported case of malignant pleural mesothelioma following treatment with chemotherapy alone. It is of interest not only for the patient's young age and the absence of exposure to asbestos, but also for the very short latency period, if compared with asbestos-related mesothelioma.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = exposure
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20/103. Unusual clear cell variant of epithelioid mesothelioma.

    Clear cell mesothelioma is an extremely rare neoplasm of the pleura, which can easily be mistaken for a metastasis of clear cell carcinoma to the pleura. We report here the histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural aspects of a new case of clear cell pleural mesothelioma in a 52-year-old man with no known asbestos exposure. He was admitted to the hospital for recurrent pleural effusion, which was negative for neoplastic cells at the cytologic examination. A partial decortication of the right pleura was performed. The morphologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features reported for this case are consistent with the diagnosis of clear cell mesothelioma. The differential diagnosis and immunohistochemical features in comparison with other clear cell neoplasms are discussed.
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