Cases reported "Plummer-Vinson Syndrome"

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1/8. The operation of upper esophageal web in plummer-vinson syndrome: a case report.

    Most cases of dysphagia associated with plummer-vinson syndrome are expected to improve with the oral administration of ferrous agents. When a web is the cause of the symptoms, surgical management is rarely necessary. However the surgical indication and technique for the web have been controversial. The patient was a 56-year-old woman who complained of restricted dietary habit because of an upper esophageal circumferential web associated with plummer-vinson syndrome. The circumferential and membranous web was resected with a surgical knife and scissors through the inner lumen of esophagus and the raw surface was sutured at five places with 4-0 proline thread under microlaryngosurgery. This surgical treatment resulted in diminished dysphagia and no recurrence of the web after the surgery.
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2/8. Plummer Vinson syndrome: unusual features.

    Plummer Vinson syndrome is a constellation of postcricoid esophageal webs, iron deficiency anemia, dysphagia and koilonychia. We describe some unusual manifestations in three patients with this syndrome; these were clubbing instead of koilonychia, tortuous esophagus in addition to presence of esophageal webs, and celiac disease.
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3/8. plummer-vinson syndrome: a report of three cases.

    plummer-vinson syndrome is characterised by dysphagia, anaemia, glossitis and oesophageal web. We report our findings in three patients with membranes in the upper oesophagus. All patients underwent endoscopic dilatation and iron replacement therapy, with good results. We review the literature of this syndrome.
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4/8. Treatment of plummer-vinson syndrome with Savary-Gilliard dilatation.

    The association of postcricoid dysphagia, iron deficiency anemia and upper esophageal webs is known as the plummer-vinson syndrome (PVS). It is predominantly a disease of middle aged females. Four patients with cervical web of the esophagus were studied, dysphagia was mostly for solids, which were non-progressive and were present for years before they presented. Initial treatment in 3 patients consisted of esophageal dilatation with savary bougies after initial rupture of the web by endoscope. In one case, due to failure to visualize the esophageal lumen by fluoroscopy guidance, guide wire was introduced and breaking of the web was performed by the endoscope, followed by bougie dilatation. In 4 patients, webs were ruptured by the endoscope and had a single session of dilatation, with no recurrence during the 3-year period of follow up. Endoscopic esophageal dilatation is simple and the procedure of choice in the treatment of "PVS" and cervical web of the esophagus.
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5/8. Gastric cancer occurring in a patient with plummer-vinson syndrome: a case report.

    plummer-vinson syndrome (sideropenic dysphagia) is characterized by dysphagia due to an upper esophageal or hypopharyngeal web in patients with chronic iron deficiency anemia. The main cause of dysphagia is the presence of the web in the cervical esophagus, and abnormal motility of the pharynx or esophagus is also found to play a significant role in this condition. This syndrome is thought to be precancerous because squamous cell carcinoma of hypopharynx, oral cavity or esophagus takes place in 10% of those patients suffering from this malady, but it is even more unusual that plummer-vinson syndrome should be accompanied by gastric cancer. We have reported here a case of a 43-year-old woman with plummer-vinson syndrome who developed stomach cancer and recovered after a radical total gastrectomy with D2 nodal dissection.
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6/8. plummer-vinson syndrome complicated by gastric cancer: a case report.

    plummer-vinson syndrome has been brought to attention as a precancerous lesion of hypopharyngeal and cervical lesions of the esophagus, but that involving the stomach is uncommon. We report a case of plummer-vinson syndrome with gastric cancer. A brief literature review of this disorder is presented, and possible causes in this unusual case are discussed.
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7/8. Upper esophageal web due to a ring formed by a squamocolumnar junction with ectopic gastric mucosa (another explanation of the Paterson-Kelly, plummer-vinson syndrome).

    A patient is presented with Barrett's esophagus (lower esophagus lined with columnar epithelium) who also has a band of columnar epithelium in the upper esophagus separated from that below by normal squamous epithelium in the midesophagus. The upper most squamocolumnar junction coincided with or formed a mucosal ring as seen at endoscopy. This ring, which was first seen on barium swallow, has the radiographic appearance of that associated with the Paterson-Kelly syndrome. This patient's unique findings may provide further insight into the etiology of upper esophageal webs or rings (Paterson-Kelly syndrome).
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8/8. An unusual clinical manifestation of secondary sjogren's syndrome and concomitant Paterson-Kelly syndrome.

    We describe the case of a female patient who presented with rheumatoid arthritis accompanied by severe dysphagia that led to prostration. The clinical picture and a barium contrast swallowing study suggested neoplastic proliferation at the borderline between the hypopharynx and the oesophagus. A comprehensive examination, however, did not confirm neoplasm. Dysphagia was caused rather by mucoso-fibrotic changes at the borderline between the hypopharynx and the oesophagus, representing the simultaneous presence of the Paterson-Kelly syndrome and secondary sjogren's syndrome.
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