Cases reported "Pneumoconiosis"

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21/63. Rare earth deposits in a deceased movie projectionist. A new case of rare earth pneumoconiosis?

    The subject described in this case report, a movie projectionist, had approximately 25 years of occupational exposure to carbon arc lamp fumes. The carbon arc deposits were visible in histological sections as small granules within macrophages of the tracheobronchial lymph nodes and hepatic Kupffer's cells. Electron microprobe analysis by energy dispersive analysis of x-rays showed the granules to be composed of the rare earth elements cerium, lanthanum and neodymium, which are the major constituents of carbon arc rods. Tissue concentrations, as determined by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, were approximately 250-2000 times those of unexposed controls, and there was evidence of their redistribution throughout the reticuloendothelial system. There were no respiratory symptoms, or radiographic or histological pulmonary changes attributable to the progressive accumulation of the rare earth elements, and as such the patient cannot be considered to have suffered from pneumoconiosis. Twenty-one published cases of rare earth pneumoconiosis, mainly in photoengravers exposed to carbon arc fumes, are reviewed and suggest that rare earth oxides are not innocuous dusts. With the increasingly widespread use of rare earth elements there is a likelhood that further occupational groups may have significant but unrecognised exposure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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22/63. The respiratory effects of cobalt.

    We studied seven subjects with certain manifestations of cobalt-induced lung disease. All worked with cobalt and were involved in either the production or use of hard metal. The mode of presentation varied from an acute hypersensitivity pneumonitis that cleared completely when exposure ceased to progressive severe interstitial fibrosis of the lungs. In one subject reexposure was followed by a recurrence of the symptoms. All subjects showed restrictive ventilatory impairment and a reduction of their diffusing capacity. The radiologic appearances varied greatly. While two subjects had clear roentgenograms with small lung volumes, others had a micronodular pattern or small blotchy nodular infiltrates, and one had diffuse reticulonodulation as is seen in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis. The pathologic appearances varied between desquamative interstitial pneumonia and overt mural fibrosis of the alveoli. Six of the seven patients had multinucleated giant cells in their biopsy specimens or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.
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ranking = 0.0089365864681994
keywords = exposure
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23/63. Acrylic resin pneumoconiosis: report of a case in a dental student.

    pneumoconiosis in dental laboratory workers has been associated with exposure to metal alloys and silica used in the manufacturing of dental prosthetics. In this report, we describe a 27-yr-old dental student who was found to have bilateral basal pulmonary interstitial infiltrates and nodules on a chest roentgenogram after a brief episode of upper respiratory infection. An open lung biopsy revealed interstitial pneumonitis with an abundance of vacuolated macrophages in the alveolar spaces. Ultrastructural analysis showed in the alveolar and interstitial spaces the accumulation of macrophages laden with electron-lucent bodies resembling plastic beads. An inhalation exposure history, taken subsequent to these findings, revealed exposure to high levels of acrylic plastic in a dental school laboratory. Removal from the site of exposure has resulted in the gradual resolution of the roentgenographic abnormalities.
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ranking = 0.017873172936399
keywords = exposure
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24/63. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature.

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure.
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ranking = 1
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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25/63. Marrow granulomas in coal workers' pneumoconiosis. A histologic study with elemental analysis.

    The differential diagnosis of bone marrow granulomas is lengthy but has not previously included coal workers' pneumoconiosis. This report describes the first case in which noncaseating epithelioid granulomas containing anthracotic pigment and birefringent silica containing crystals were discovered in the marrow of a patient with progressive massive fibrosis of coal workers' pneumoconiosis. The silicotic nature of the crystals was confirmed using energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis. There was no evidence of a mycobacterial, fungal, or other etiology for the granulomas. This case demonstrates that coal workers' pneumoconiosis should be added to the differential diagnosis of bone marrow granulomas and that marrow examination may be a source of tissue for documentation of specific occupational exposures.
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ranking = 0.9955317067659
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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26/63. Zeolite exposure and associated pneumoconiosis.

    Naturally occurring zeolite minerals are aluminum silicates widespread in the earth's crust. Several of these minerals have fibrous forms and have been implicated as a possible cause of benign and malignant diseases of the lung and pleura in turkey. This report describes a patient, living in an area of nevada rich in zeolites, who presented with idiopathic pleural thickening and pulmonary fibrosis associated with extensive pulmonary deposition of zeolites.
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ranking = 0.017873172936399
keywords = exposure
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27/63. Respiratory effects of hard-metal dust exposure.

    Workers exposed to hard-metal dust are at risk of developing interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Focusing on the lung parenchymal disorders that result, the author thoroughly reviews the background of the problem, animal studies and recent environmental data related to "hard-metal disease," the clinical presentation, and finally its etiology.
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ranking = 0.017873172936399
keywords = exposure
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28/63. The posterior pleural junction line in pneumoconiosis. A report of 3 cases with thickening.

    Disease may change the position or cause thickening or distortion of the posterior pleural junction line. Pleural changes associated with silica or asbestos exposure may also result in radiologically recognisable thickening of the line. Three examples are presented.
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ranking = 0.0044682932340997
keywords = exposure
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29/63. Dental technician's pneumoconiosis. A report of two cases.

    diagnosis of pneumoconiosis was made in 2 dental technicians presenting with interstitial lung disease. The occupational origin of inhaled dust was confirmed by mineralogic analyses, which disclosed mainly large amounts of chromium-cobalt-molybdenum particles originating from vitallium prostheses, but also showed abrasives (silica and silicon carbide) and asbestos in 1 patient. The presence of vitallium and its chemical stability in bronchoalveolar lavage and lung several years after cessation of exposure confirm the resistance of this alloy to corrosion by body fluids. This contrasts with the high solubility of cobalt described in cobalt or hard metal disease. We suggest that dental technician's pneumoconiosis is a complex pneumoconiosis distinct from silicosis, asbestosis, or hard metal disease and that Cr-Co-Mo alloys play a role in its pathogenesis.
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ranking = 0.0044682932340997
keywords = exposure
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30/63. Mixed pneumoconiosis: silicosis, asbestosis, talcosis, and berylliosis.

    Mixed pneumoconiosis is pulmonary disease due to two or more inhaled mineral irritants. chronic disease due to beryllium has not been a component of any described mixed pneumoconiosis. A man with occupational exposure to a combination of dusts developed severe pulmonary disease. silicosis, talcosis, asbestosis, and berylliosis were all documented by an open biopsy of the lung. The varieties of mixed pneumoconiosis are summarized.
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ranking = 0.9955317067659
keywords = occupational exposure, exposure
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