Cases reported "Pneumonia, Bacterial"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/11. stenotrophomonas maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant.

    Stenotrophomonas (xanthomonas) maltophilia is an aerobic, non-fermentative, gram-negative bacillus that is generally considered an opportunistic pathogen. Infections due to S. maltophilia have become increasingly important in the hospital environment. patients compromised by debilitating illnesses, surgical procedures or indwelling vascular catheters are most prone to S. maltophilia infections. To our knowledge, we report the first case of S. maltophilia pneumonia in a premature infant of 31 weeks gestational age. Although the therapy of choice for severe infections caused by S. maltophilia remains to be decided, this patient was successfully treated by amikacin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/11. acinetobacter calcoaceticus pneumonia and the formation of pneumatoceles.

    Pneumatoceles are cystic lesions of the lungs often seen in children with staphylococcal pneumonia and positive-pressure ventilation. acinetobacter calcoaceticus is an aerobic, short immobile gram-negative rod, or coccobacillus, which is an omnipresent saprophyte. The variant anitratus is the most clinically significant pathogen in this family, usually presenting as a lower respiratory tract infection. Acinetobacter has been demonstrated to be one of the most common organisms found in the ICU. We present three critically ill surgery patients with Acinetobacter pneumonia, high inspiratory pressures, and the subsequent development of pneumatoceles. One of these patients died from a ruptured pneumatocele, resulting in tension pneumothorax. Treatment of pneumatoceles should center on appropriate intravenous antimicrobial therapy. This should be culture directed but is most often accomplished with imipenem. Percutaneous, computed tomographic-guided catheter placement or direct tube thoracostomy decompression of the pneumatocele may prevent subsequent rupture and potentially lethal tension pneumothorax.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/11. capnocytophaga cynodegmi cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis in a diabetic man.

    capnocytophaga cynodegmi (formerly "DF-2 like organism"), a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity, is a capnophilic, gram-negative, facultative bacillus. C. cynodegmi has rarely been encountered in human diseases. We report the first known case of cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis caused by C. cynodegmi in a diabetic man from central india following a dog bite.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/11. rhodococcus equi pneumonia in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus: case report and review.

    rhodococcus equi is a facultative, intracellular, gram-positive coccobacillus increasingly reported as an opportunistic pathogen in patients positive for human immunodeficiency virus (hiv). An hiv-positive man developed R. equi pneumonia and sepsis. He failed to improve despite surgical drainage of localized infection and many empiric antibiotics. time-kill studies of R. equi isolated from the patient were performed against various antimicrobial agents to optimize therapy. levofloxacin seemed to offer excellent in vitro bactericidal activity. Antagonism was observed with certain antibiotic combinations. Our anecdotal case report suggests that fluoroquinolones such as levofloxacin may offer superior efficacy to standard therapy in rhodococcal infections; their clinical utility deserves further investigation. In view of potential antagonism, prospective susceptibility testing for various drugs and drug combinations should be considered when clinically indicated.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/11. A case of primary tularemic pneumonia presenting with necrotizing mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes.

    tularemia is an unusual disease caused by the gram-negative coccobacillus francisella tularensis. The clinical features of the disease depend on the route of inoculation. Ulceroglandular and typhoidal forms have been recognized as occurring in tularemia, however primary or secondary pneumonic infections have also been reported. Symptoms, laboratory markers and radiological features are non-specific in tularemic pneumonia. diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and evidence of elevated agglutinating antibodies to F. tularensis (> 1:128). We report a case of primary tularemic pneumonia presenting with pulmonary infiltrates and necrotizing mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in an otherwise healthy subject from a non-endemic area. diagnosis of tularemia was obtained serologically, and antibiotic therapy with doxycycline and streptomycin resolved symptoms and radiological abnormalities. We suggest that tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia with mediastinal and/or hilar lymphadenopathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/11. Cytologic appearance of rhodococcus equi in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens. A case report.

    Immunocompromised patients are at risk of developing infections caused by rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive bacillus that can cause pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To the author's knowledge this is the first report describing the cytologic features of the infection in a patient who had a confirmatory tissue biopsy and positive culture. infection with R equi may go unrecognized by pathologists unaware of its presentation and appearance in cytologic material.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/11. Transmission of lactobacillus pneumonia by a transplanted lung.

    Herein we report lactobacillus pneumonia in a lung transplant recipient. The organism may have been normal flora in the donor but was a pathogen in the immunosuppressed recipient. Antibiotic therapy should include penicillin or clindamycin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/11. actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans pneumonia with chest wall and subphrenic abscess.

    A 14-year-old girl had progressive dyspnea and right lower chest pain for about 1 1/2 months and a weight loss of 3 kg in 2 months. Chest X-ray revealed right pleural effusion and a round infiltration over the right lower chest, initially suspected to be malignant. Image study revealed consolidation in the right middle and lower lobes with abscess-like lesions around the right lower pleura and transdiaphrenic involvement to the subphrenic region. The lesion had also invaded the intercostal muscle. The pleural abscess was obtained by fiberoptic thoracoscopy, and culture of the pus grew typical colonies of actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. After the causative microorganism had been identified, cefoxitin was given for 2 weeks followed by oral amoxicillin (250 mg/6 h) for a total period of 3 months. Follow-up chest X-ray revealed resolution of the lung lesions and the patient recovered gradually without any sequelae.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/11. Severe burkholderia (pseudomonas) gladioli infection in chronic granulomatous disease: report of two successfully treated cases.

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by a defect in phagocytic cells that leads to recurrent superficial and deep pyogenic infections. burkholderia (pseudomonas) gladioli is a gram-negative bacillus in the pseudomallei group of pseudomonads that is known primarily as a plant pathogen. We report two cases of pneumonia, one accompanied by septicemia, caused by B. gladioli in patients with CGD and their successful treatment with antibiotics. We believe these represent the first reports of human disease caused by this organism. We conclude that B. gladioli should be considered a potential pathogen in patients with CGD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/11. bacteremia caused by arcobacter cryaerophilus 1B.

    arcobacter cryaerophilus group 1B, a gram-negative, curved or helical bacillus primarily known as a bovine and porcine pathogen, was isolated from the blood of a uremic patient with hematogenous pneumonia. The patient was treated successfully with ceftizoxime and tobramycin.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bacillus
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pneumonia, Bacterial'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.