Cases reported "Pneumopericardium"

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1/14. pneumopericardium after bronchoscopic carbon dioxide laser surgery--a case report.

    A female baby sustained pneumopericardium after bronchoscopic CO2 laser surgery for tracheal stenosis. Perioperative pneumopericardium though rare is a life-threatening condition in babies. The symptoms are usually not specific such as hypotension, bradycardia, muffled heart sound, cardiovascular collapse, etc. The causes and clinical findings of pneumopericardium were reviewed, as are the radiographic features so as to differentiate the condition from pneumomediastinum. Early recognition of pneumopericardium is important, because emergent pericardiocentesis may be required if there is clinical evidence of cardiac tamponade.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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2/14. Pneumopericardial tamponade after coronary artery bypass operation.

    A case of relatively uncommon post-operative cardiac tamponade caused by air is described.
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keywords = operative
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3/14. pneumorrhachis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, and pneumoretroperitoneum after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis: report of a case.

    This article presents the first known case of pneumorrhachis (spinal air), pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, pneumoretroperitoneum, and subcutaneous emphysema after proctocolectomy for ulcerative colitis. We review the patient's medical history, clinical and laboratory findings, radiographic data, and operative records, as well as the relevant literature. We describe the case of a young male with ulcerative colitis who developed pneumorrhachis, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumoretroperitoneum, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardium after a proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Unlike the case we report, previously described episodes of pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema in patients with ulcerative colitis developed before operative intervention. We offer possible explanations for these unusual complications based on analysis of this case and thorough review of the literature.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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4/14. pneumopericardium and subcutaneous emphysema of the neck. An unusual manifestation of colonoscopic perforation.

    Subcutaneous neck emphysema has been reported infrequently following colonoscopic perforation and only a single case of pneumopericardium has been previously reported. The successful management of these patients in the literature has largely been non-operative. We report a case of colonoscopic perforation which presented with subcutaneous neck emphysema, pneumopericardium, and pneumoperitoneum that required operative intervention.
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ranking = 2
keywords = operative
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5/14. Tension pneumopericardium: a case report and a review of the literature.

    pneumopericardium, or air within the pericardial sack, generally occurs after high-speed blunt deceleration injuries. Although it is generally relatively benign, in rare instances, it can become hemodynamically significant. The diagnosis is easily made on plain chest radiography. More recently, chest computed tomography has been helpful in making the diagnosis. Injury to vital structures such as the tracheobronchial tree or esophageal tears require operative fixation. However, in most instances, pneumopericardium is secondary to dissection of air through the adjacent structures to the pericardial space. The air is trapped as a one-way valve. The pneumopericardium is usually self-limited, requiring no specific therapy. In patients where there is a concomitant pneumothorax, chest tube drainage suffices. We present a case of hemodynamically significant tension pneumopericardium that occurred in association with blunt carotid injury and aortic
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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6/14. Hazard warning. A case of postoperative pulmonary barotrauma.

    A case is described in which extensive pulmonary barotrauma occurred due to the application of a face mask to an indwelling cuffed endotracheal tube. The design of the mask is such that a seal was made between the mask and the tube. The design of mask is widely used in theatre recovery areas and clinicians are alerted to this potential hazard.
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ranking = 4
keywords = operative
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7/14. Pyopneumopericardium attributed to an esophagopericardial fistula: report of a survivor and review of the literature.

    Herein we describe a case of pyopneumopericardium that resulted from formation of an acquired esophagopericardial fistula in a patient with silent, benign esophageal ulcer disease. Atypical features on initial examination suggested congestive heart failure or a pneumonic process (or both). The delayed development of pneumopericardium disclosed on a chest roentgenogram led to the clinical recognition of the esophagopericardial fistula. Subsequent emergent pericardiocentesis relieved cardiac tamponade and enabled us to diagnose pyopneumopericardium. A radiographic contrast study with use of meglumine diatrizoate revealed the site of the fistula in the midesophagus. The esophagopericardial fistula was surgically closed, and our patient had a good final result. Formation of an esophagopericardial fistula is a relatively uncommon finding; of the 60 previously reported cases, only 10 patients have survived. As illustrated in the current case, early diagnosis and treatment, including pericardial drainage and intense antibiotic therapy followed by a well-planned operative closure of the fistula, are paramount for the successful management of esophagopericardial fistulas.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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8/14. Esophago-pericardial fistula. A case report and review of the literature.

    A case of esophago-pericardial fistula is described which was treated successfully by pericardial drainage and closure of the fistula 12 days after perforation. The condition is rare and often fatal. In 29 reported cases there were only 5 survivors. On the basis of our observation and a review of the literature it is concluded that the first step in the treatment should be pericardial drainage and antibiotic coverage, followed by elective operative closure of the fistula.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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9/14. Fatal pneumopericardium caused by SF6 gas infusion into the pleural space after pneumonectomy and pericardial resection.

    A 63-year-old man with lung carcinoma underwent a right pneumonectomy and combined resection of the pericardium. Postoperatively, SF6 gas was introduced into the empty pleural space for the protection of excessive shift of heart and mediastinum, but a fatal pneumopericardium occurred. A rare but possible complication of cardiac tamponade after inert gas infusion in patients undergoing combined resection of pericardium is reported.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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10/14. Pneumopyopericardium.

    Pneumopyopericardium is a rare disease, the etiology of which can be traumatic or non-traumatic. Today the most common cause of non-traumatic disease seems to be ulceration or carcinoma in the lower esophagus or upper stomach. The present cases were caused by ulcerations in two patients and a postoperative penetrating abscess in the third. All had connections with surgery in the region. Chest radiography disclosing fluid and gas in the expanded pericardium was the main diagnostic method. The prognosis is poor and all three patients died.
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ranking = 1
keywords = operative
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