Cases reported "Polydactyly"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/17. Postaxial polydactyly, ulnar ray dysgenesis, and renal cystic dysplasia in sibs.

    We describe two brothers with variable expression of a unique syndrome. One sib has postaxial polydactyly of the right hand and feet, two digits on the left hand (a thumb and first digit), bilateral ulnar ray dysgenesis, ectrodactyly of one hand, and ultrasonic evidence of cystic kidneys. His brother has postaxial polydactyly and small kidneys. The parents and a third sib are normal. They do not have the Pallister ulnar-mammary syndrome but may have an unusual form of the Weyers oligodactyly syndrome. This appears to be the first report of an acro-renal syndrome with ulnar dysgenesis, oligodactyly, polydactyly, and dysplastic kidneys.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/17. A rare occurrence of polydactyly.

    polydactyly is a common congenital foot deformity that varies in its clinical presentation. Duplication of the central ray accounts for 3% to 6% of all cases of pedal polydactyly. A review of polydactyly and its multiple classification schemes is presented, along with a rare case involving the duplication of a central digit and its surgical correction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/17. polydactyly of the feet in children: suggestions for surgical management.

    polydactyly is the commonest congenital deformity of the foot, presenting as a range of defects from minor soft tissue duplications to major bony abnormalities. There is a relative paucity of information on the management of this condition in the literature compared to that concerning polydactyly of the hand. We present a consecutive series of 34 cases of polydactyly of the foot in 25 patients treated surgically at our unit and these are classified according to the protocol described by Blauth and Olason. We emphasise the importance of preoperative classification using radiographs and an individualised surgical approach giving consideration to aesthetic and functional outcome.In the literature a number of authors have expressed the view that in polydactyly of the fifth ray of the foot the most lateral digit should always be excised irrespective of whether this is the more fully formed digit. We believe this should not always be the case and we describe two cases of polysyndactyly where the more medial element of a fifth-ray polydactyly was excised to allow for better maintenance of the contour of the foot. This involved more complex surgery than excision of the lateral element but gave a superior cosmetic and functional result.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/17. Treatment of lateral ray polydactyly of the foot: focusing on the selection of the toe to be excised.

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the results of the operative treatment of lateral ray polydactyly and to consider appropriate surgical procedures, especially focusing on the selection of the toe, lateral toe or medial toe, to be resected. Twenty-two patients with lateral ray polydactyly foot (25 individual feet) at an average of 71 months' follow-up were included in this study. Cases were classified morphologically into three types on the basis of Hirase's configuration. In addition, these types were divided into two subtypes, metatarsal and phalangeal, on the basis of radiographic evaluation of the level of duplication. The clinical evaluations of the reconstructed toe were performed, and these results were investigated according to their morphologic classification and excised toe group. The distinctive problem of medial toe excision is valgus deformity. Eight of 25 toes retained persistent valgus deformity, and all of these cases were in the medial toe excision group. On the other hand, a distinctive problem in lateral toe excision is postoperative pain. Two patients suffered from postoperative pain in phalangeal type cases in the lateral toe excision group, and the remaining medial toe had a medial protuberant middle phalanx. The pain occurred at that protuberant point. Based on their experiences, the authors created an algorithm for selection of the toe to be excised. In metatarsal type cases, from a functional perspective, the toe that has a radiographically dominant metatarsus should be retained. On the other hand, in phalangeal type cases, the authors give priority to shape rather than function, and they excise the morphologically smaller toe independent of the condition of the phalanx as viewed on radiography. If the medial toe and the lateral toe are approximately the same size, the authors excise the lateral toe to avoid valgus deformity. When the lateral toe has severe valgus deformity that seems unlikely to be correctable intraoperatively, the lateral toe should be considered for excision even if it is larger than the medial toe.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/17. polydactyly of the foot. literature review and case presentations.

    polydactyly is a fairly common congenital condition of the foot and is characterized literally by supernumerary toes (digit or metatarsal). The frequency of polydactyly varies widely among populations. It may be an isolated condition or part of a congenital syndrome. polydactyly is generally classified into three major groups: medial ray (preaxial), central ray and lateral ray (postaxial). The duplication may appear at the distal and middle phalanges or at the whole digit and metatarsal. The complexity of the deformity ranges from a simple soft-tissue problem to a completely developed accessory ray. Careful clinical and radiographic evaluation should be made prior to treatment to achieve good functional and cosmetic results. Most cases are treated during childhood before walking age. adult cases are more rare, and surgical management of the deformity is still debated. Nevertheless, surgery can be performed at any age as in our series with good results.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/17. VACTERL association with a cleft hand.

    Regarding radial ray deficiency, several reports suggest that preaxial limb anomalies occur frequently, while postaxial limb anomalies and cleft hand (split-hands) are rarely associated with VACTERL. We describe a rare clinical case of VACTERL with cleft hand and a number of visceral anomalies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/17. Probable new syndrome in a Mexican family with congenital palmar polyonychia and postaxial limb defects.

    Congenital palmar polyonychia (CPP) is a rare and usually sporadic birth defect. We report on a Mexican girl with CPP of both 5th fingers and her sister with ectrodactyly with ulnar ray deficits and agenesis of the ulna. In previous reports, CPP has been seen in ectrodactyly with involvement of the ulna and ulnar digital rays and with postaxial polydactyly. Such findings observed in our patients can be considered a form of CPP. Autosomal dominant inheritance of CPP is more likely based in previous informative families with vertical transmission and instances of male-to-male transmission. The present and two previous families with affected sibs only may represent parental gonadal mosaicism, whereas de novo mutation or incomplete evaluation of relatives could be an explanation for sporadic cases. Variable expression of the CPP phenotype may be a new autosomal dominant entity, i.e., a CPP-postaxial limb defect syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/17. An unusual and nonclassified central polydactyly of the foot.

    Central-type, 8-toed polydactyly is a distinctly rare congenital foot anomaly. In this report, a new subtype of the metatarsal type of the central ray polydactyly of the foot is presented. This includes a triplication, one of which is Y-shaped of the second metatarsal and 8 toes. In the literature, polydactyly of the foot has been usually operated during childhood after walking age. We performed the surgery at 6 months of age. After ray amputation of the extra toes, we reapproximated the muscle pieces that remained on the original first and second metatarsals and repaired the transverse metatarsal ligament. Despite the early surgery, we did not encounter any problems intraoperatively and postoperatively.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/17. Apert syndrome with preaxial polydactyly showing the typical mutation Ser252Trp in the FGFR2 gene.

    The Apert syndrome is characterized by craniosynostosis and syndactyly of hands and feet. Although most cases are sporadic, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance is well documented. Two mutations in the FGFR2 gene (Ser252Trp and Pro253Arg) account for most of the cases. We report a patient with a rare form of Apert syndrome with polydactyly. The proposita has turribrachycephaly. complete syndactyly of 2nd to 5th digits ("mitten hands" and cutaneous fusion of all toes). The x-rays revealed craniosynostosis of the coronal suture and preaxial polydactyly of hands and feet with distal bony fusion. Molecular analysis found a C755G transversion (Ser252Trp) in the FGFR2 gene. Only eight patients with Apert syndrome and preaxial polydactyly have been reported and this is the first case in which molecular diagnosis is available. On the basis of the molecular findings in this patient, polydactyly should be considered part of the spectrum of abnormalities in the Apert syndrome. This assertion would establish the need for a new molecular classification of the acrocephalopolysyndactylies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/17. A new surgical method for treating lateral ray polydactyly with brachydactyly of the foot: lengthening the reconstructed fifth toe.

    Lateral ray polydactyly is the most common anomaly of the foot. However, when both the fifth and sixth toes are markedly shorter than a normal toe, reconstruction of a normal-length fifth toe has not been performed, because the toe rarely serves a functional purpose. The authors devised a new method whereby the fifth toe could be lengthened using the excess toe as a composite flap. Fifteen patients (15 toes) underwent our procedures and were evaluated in this study. The stepladder island flap is used. The decision as to which toe to use as the flap was made preoperatively based on nail size, and its morphologic and radiographic conditions. Stepladder incision lines were designed on the dorsal and plantar sides of the duplication. Care was taken to preserve the neurovascular bundle with the subcutaneous pedicle and osteotomies were made at the middle phalanx of the flap and the distal or middle phalanx of the recipient in almost all cases. The elevated composite toe flap was advanced and the bone was fixed rigidly for 1-2 months after the operation. During our follow-up periods, the reconstructed toes grew normally, and good aesthetic results had been achieved apart from the bulkiness of the reconstructed toes. There was no deficiency in circulation or function for walking, running, or shoe-fitting in this series.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ray
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Polydactyly'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.