Cases reported "Popliteal Cyst"

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1/17. Cystic adventitial disease: a trap for the unwary.

    Cystic adventitial disease is an uncommon condition. A case of cystic adventitial disease of the popliteal artery is reported in a young man who has been followed up for 14 years after surgical treatment. Early recognition and treatment of the condition will prevent progression to popliteal thrombosis and critical ischaemia. However, diagnosis of the condition is difficult. Characteristic features in the presenting history, such as fluctuation in severity of symptoms, sudden onset after vigorous activity and delayed recovery time after cessation of exercise are identified, which should help the clinician avoid misdiagnosis and delayed diagnosis of the condition. The clinician is also warned of the associated misleading clinical features such as the presence of normal peripheral pulses and normal ankle pressures in some cases of CAD.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis
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2/17. rupture of Baker's cyst producing pseudothrombophlebitis in a patient with Reiter's syndrome.

    This is an unusual case of pseudothrombophlebitis resulting from rupture of Baker's cyst in a patient with Reiter's syndrome. The patient presented with a swollen, painful left calf and persistent itching on the skin of the calf. ultrasonography showed a ruptured popliteal cyst with minimal hemorrhage and fluid collection within the fascial compartments and gastrocnemius muscle. color Doppler ultrasound showed a patent popliteal vein and artery and duplex Doppler scans revealed a normal flow pattern. In conclusion, the clinical picture of deep vein thrombosis and that of pseudothrombophlebitis are difficult to distinguish by clinical examination and necessitate detailed examination by imaging techniques. Persistent pruritus on calf skin resulting from irritation of inflammatory synovial fluid may be an important clinical feature.
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ranking = 25.196973273159
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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3/17. Nonoperative management of lower extremity claudication caused by a Baker's cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    A Baker's or popliteal cyst is a synovial cyst in the popliteal fossa arising from the knee joint. The majority of patients develop a popliteal mass that is asymptomatic, but in a small percentage of patients, complications and symptoms occur; these may not only encompass the popliteal veins and arteries but may also include cyst leakage, infection, hemorrhage, and compartment syndrome. Severe lower limb ischemia caused by a Baker's cyst is extremely rare, having been reported only six times since 1960; all patients were treated with surgical intervention. We report the case of a 29-year-old male presenting with right calf claudication caused by a Baker's cyst. The patient was managed nonoperatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, proper exercises, and close observation. His claudication improved progressively and had completely disappeared at 12 months of follow-up. A repeat duplex arterial study showed that increased blood flow to the right foot and the right ankle/brachial index improved to 0.97 from 0.67. Repeat ultrasonography demonstrated that the size of the cyst decreased from 4.5 x 1.5 cm to 2.8 x 0.9 cm. The patient had been followed for 20 months and remained asymptomatic in the last 8 months. We will continue to follow the patient to evaluate the long-term outcome. In summary, our own data and literature review suggest that the limb ischemia caused by Baker's cyst may be a transient condition and can be managed nonoperatively in selected patients.
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ranking = 0.028487709086559
keywords = vein
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4/17. Episodic intermittent claudication associated with a Baker's cyst.

    Baker first described synovial cysts in the leg in connection with diseases of the knee joint. Whilst the majority are asymptomatic, some present as a localised swelling behind the knee, and others either compress the popliteal vein or rupture and can be misdiagnosed as deep vein thrombosis; transmitted pulsation through the cyst can suggest the presence of a popliteal aneurysm. This paper documents a case of intermittent claudication of the lower limb secondary to compression of the popliteal artery by a Baker's cyst.
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ranking = 25.196973273159
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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5/17. popliteal artery occlusion caused by cystic adventitial disease: successful treatment by urokinase followed by nonresectional cystotomy.

    Preoperative diagnosis of an occluded popliteal artery caused by cystic adventitial disease allowed use of urokinase to successfully dissolve secondary thrombosis. Subsequent non-resectional adventitial cystotomy and evacuation of cyst contents allowed lasting restoration of a patent arterial lumen and return of normal distal pulses. This nongrafting technique may serve as a model for future patients with occluded arteries caused by this condition.
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ranking = 1
keywords = thrombosis
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6/17. Posterior compartment syndrome following ruptured Baker's cyst.

    A 35 year old man presented with the sudden onset of left leg pain and swelling. Empirical anticoagulation for presumed deep vein thrombophlebitis was followed by acute worsening of symptoms. On further evaluation the patient was found to have a ruptured Baker's cyst and an acute posterior compartment syndrome.
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ranking = 11.280786603034
keywords = deep vein, vein, deep
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7/17. Recurrent rupture of a popliteal cyst in a patient with chronic tophaceous gout.

    Popliteal cysts which rupture to mimic a deep vein thrombosis (DTV) can be seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides. gout with cystal synovitis and ruptured popliteal cyst has only been sporadically reported and nowhere has this occurred more than once.
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ranking = 25.168485564073
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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8/17. gout presenting as a popliteal cyst. A case of pseudothrombophlebitis.

    A 64-year-old man with progressive swelling and erythema of his right calf preceded by dull aching in the right popliteal fossa was presumed to have deep vein thrombophlebitis. A venogram revealed normal circulation in the right lower leg, and an ultrasound examination of the right popliteal fossa revealed a 2 X 5-cm popliteal cyst. Fluid aspirated from the cyst confirmed the diagnosis of gout. Popliteal cysts associated with gout are rare, and those that rupture, leak, dissect, or enlarge can mimic thrombophlebitis (a phenomenon known as pseudothrombophlebitis). Thus, the primary care physician should consider the diagnosis of popliteal cyst in patients who appear to have deep vein thrombophlebitis.
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ranking = 22.561573206068
keywords = deep vein, vein, deep
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9/17. Pseudothrombophlebitis in an adolescent without rheumatic disease. A case report.

    Pseudothrombophlebitis syndrome is the occurrence of calf pain and swelling caused by extrinsic compression of the popliteal vessels by an enlarging Baker's cyst or by calf inflammation that occurs as the result of a ruptured Baker's cyst. Few cases of pseudothrombophlebitis syndrome have been reported in patients less than 18 years of age, and nearly all these young patients had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Reported here is the case of a 17-year-old male patient without rheumatic disease who presented to the outpatient clinic with a 1-week history of an increasingly painful swelling of the right calf without any history of precipitating factors for a deep vein thrombosis.
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ranking = 25.168485564073
keywords = deep vein thrombosis, deep vein, thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein, deep
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10/17. MRI findings of concurrent acute DVT and dissecting popliteal cyst.

    A case of concurrent popliteal vein thrombosis and a dissecting popliteal cyst noted on the same MRI exam is described. Pseudothrombophlebitis is a well known entity in which a ruptured or dissecting popliteal cyst clinically mimics thrombophlebitis; the current case can be considered "pseudo-pseudo thrombophlebitis." This case demonstrates the importance of routine review of the venous structures of the posterior fossa for all MRI exams of the knee.
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ranking = 1.4333280700578
keywords = thrombosis, vein thrombosis, vein
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