Cases reported "Postmortem Changes"

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1/2. diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in an exhumed decomposed brain after twenty months of burial in a deep grave.

    After 20 months of interment in a deep grave, the decomposed body of the 81-year old testator of a will was exhumed to sustain the burden of proof that he lacked testamentary capacity when the will was rewritten two days prior to his death. The brain was mushy and pulverized with complete disappearance of the brainstem, cerebellum and subcortical ganglia. Small foci of relatively intact dorsal frontal neocortex were identified. Sections from these foci were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, bielchowsky silver stain and immunostains for beta amyloid peptide (betaA4), tau and alpha-synuclein. Despite severe autolysis and decomposition, the bielchowsky stain and the betaA4 immunostains showed preserved frequent neuritic amyloid plaques with very few residual neurofibrillary tangles. cerebral amyloid angiopathy was present. At the present time this case represents the first documented and reported case of direct tissue diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease pathology in a decomposed brain following long term burial in a deep grave.
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2/2. Postmortem extravasation of blood potentially simulating antemortem bruising.

    A case of florid postmortem extravasation of blood, potentially simulating antemortem bruising, is presented. A 98-year-old woman died in hospital, the cause of death being certified as congestive cardiac failure. After burial, it was apparent that the grave had been disturbed by crowbars and shovels. exhumation was performed and autopsy revealed considerable apparent facial bruising as well as lacerations and fractures. There was no documentation by the medical or nursing staff of any injuries to the deceased preceding death. There was also no documentation of injury by the funeral directors. Subsequently, two men admitted to removing the body from the grave and mutilating it. Thus, what was apparently facial bruising was, in fact, postmortem extravasation of blood simulating antemortem bruising. The degree of extravasation was considered to be related to the severity of the injuries, loose subcutaneous tissues of the head and neck, and dependent position of the body upon return to the grave. This case demonstrates the degree of postmortem extravasation of blood that may occur in particular circumstances and may simulate antemortem bruising. In other circumstances, the postmortem extravasation of blood may well have led investigators to pursue inquiries regarding homicide.
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