Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/305. Mitral regurgitation after pericardiectomy for constrictive pericarditis.

    We report a case of constrictive pericarditis in which trace mitral valve regurgitation was detected preoperatively and temporarily worsened after a pericardiectomy was performed. The early postoperative data suggested that the increased mobility of the lateral wall, in conjunction with an increase in the left ventricular volume, might be one of the causes of the perioperative mitral valve dysfunction. The mitral valve function returned to the preoperative baseline thirteen months after the pericardiectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/305. Decreased left ventricular filling pressure 8 months after corrective surgery in a 55-year-old man with tetralogy of fallot: adaptation for increased preload.

    A 55-year-old man with tetralogy of fallot underwent corrective surgery. Left ventricular filling pressure increased markedly with increased left ventricular volume one month after surgery, then decreased over the next 7 months, presumably due to increased left ventricular compliance.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/305. Transient pseudo-hypoaldosteronism following resection of the ileum: normal level of lymphocytic aldosterone receptors outside the acute phase.

    Pseudo-hypoaldosteronism (PHA) is due to mineralocorticoid resistance and manifests as hyponatremia and hyperkalemia with increased plasma aldosterone levels. It may be familial or secondary to abnormal renal sodium handling. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with multifocal cancer of the colon, who developed PHA after subtotal colectomy, ileal resection and jejunostomy. She was treated with 6 g of salt daily to prevent dehydration, which she stopped herself because of reduced fecal losses. One month later she was admitted with signs of acute adrenal failure, i.e. fatigue, severe nausea, blood pressure of 80/60 mmHg, extracellular dehydration, hyponatremia (118 mmol/l); hyperkalemia (7.6 mmol/l), increased blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (200 mg/dl) and creatininemia (2.5 mg/dl), and decreased plasma bicarbonates level (HCO3-: 16 mmol/l; N: 27-30). However, the plasma cortisol was high (66 microg/100 ml at 10:00 h; N: 8-15) and the ACTH was normal (13 pg/ml, N: 10-60); there was a marked increase in plasma renin activity (>37 ng/ml/h; N supine <3), active renin (869 pg/ml; N supine: 1.120), aldosterone (>2000 pg/ml; N supine <150) and plasma AVP (20 pmol/l; N: 0.5-2.5). The plasma ANH level was 38 pmol/l (N supine: 5-25). A urinary steroidogram resulted in highly elevated tetrahydrocortisol (THF: 13.3 mg/24h; N: 1.4 /-0.8) with no increase in tetrahydrocortisone (THE: 3.16 mg/24h; N: 2.7 /-2.0) excretion, and with low THE/THF (0.24; N: 1.87 /-0.36) and alpha THF/THF (0.35; N: 0.92 /-0.42) ratios. The number of mineralocorticoid receptors in mononuclear leukocytes was in the lower normal range for age, while the number of glucocorticoid receptors was reduced. Small-bowel resection in ileostomized patients causes excessive fecal sodium losses and results in chronic sodium depletion with contraction of the plasma volume and severe secondary hyperaldosteronism. Nevertheless, this hyperaldosteronism may be associated with hyponatremia and hyperkalemia suggesting PHA related to the major importance of the colon for the absorption of sodium. In conclusion, this case report emphasizes 1) the possibility of a syndrome of acquired PHA with severe hyperkalemia after resection of the ileum and colon responding to oral salt supplementation; 2) the major increase in AVP and the small increase in ANH; 3) the strong increase in urinary THF with low THE/THF and alpha THF/THF ratios; 4) the normal number of lymphocytic mineralocorticoid receptors outside the acute episode.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/305. Surgical treatment of poliomyelitic scoliosis.

    Between 1968 and 1973 forty nine patients suffering from poliomyelitic scoliosis were treated surgically at the Rizzoli Institute. They were due to asymmetrical paralysis and contracture in the muscles of the trunk and limbs. Associated pathological conditions were found, such as pelvic obliquity, and vascular and trophic changes due to ganglionic lesions. The differing incidence and combination of these factors gave rise to various clinical types of spinal deformity. The average severity of curve was 39 degrees, the localisation was predominantly central, the average extent was ten vertebrae, and there was a marked predominance of right convexity (twenty nine out of thirty six). The rate of progression was maximum during puberty and almost negligible after bony maturity. It was greater in males and was unfavourably affected by the severity and asymmetrical distribution of the paralysis, by the early appearance of the disease, by high localisation of the deformity, and by the erect posture in patients who were ambulant. The most frequent visceral complications were in the respiratory system (ten patients with a deficit over 50%), followed by cardiac changes. Surgical treatment was adopted in patients with progressive curves over 60 degrees, because of the inevitable deterioration in their general condition and the tendency of the deformity to become fixed. Pre-operative correction by Halo-traction results (52% correction) than Risser plasters (38%). Posterior arthrodesis by Harrington's method was carried out in all the more recent cases (forty four). Post-operative plaster was maintained for eight months and then replaced by an orthopaedic corset. At bony maturity there was an averaged improvement of 35% in the angle of curvature, and an average improvement of 6% in vital capacity. The best corrections were obtained in patients under fourteen (42%), in dorso-lumbar scoliosis (40%) and in patients with curves above 100 degrees (38%). There was an average increase in height of 9.1 cms and a reduction in the gibbus of 3.4 cms. The complications included one traumatic pneumothorax, eight pseudarthroses, and breakage of the distraction rod in two cases resulting in complete relapse of the deformity. In six cases the upper hooks became loos and there were two cases of postoperative staphylococcal infection. In the distally sited curves our present policy is towards combining posterior arthrodesis with Dwyer's anterior interbody fusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.5994292310457
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/305. safety issues in ultrasound-assisted large-volume lipoplasty.

    Ultrasound-assisted large volume lipoplasty is controversial because of the potential for increased morbidity and mortality. The plastic surgeon must pay attention to details in patient selection, anesthesia considerations, intraoperative fluid balance, and the technical aspects of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty to be consistently successful. The avoidance or early detection of complications such as intracavitary penetrations, fluid overload, hypovolemia, deep venous thrombosis, and lidocaine toxicity requires frequent examination by the surgeon. When properly executed, large volume lipoplasty can be gratifying to both patient and surgeon.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/305. Anomalous origin of a coronary artery in a transplanted heart.

    Upon routine coronary angiography one year after surgery in a 62-year-old male recipient of a heart transplant, an abnormal origin of the left anterior descending coronary artery from the pulmonary artery was found in the donor heart. This very rare congenital anomaly had not been detected during harvesting and transplantation of the heart, and to our knowledge it has never been described before in a heart transplant patient. The donor was a 43-year-old male who died of a spontaneous intracranial bleeding. The recipient continues to enjoy a normal functional capacity and is free of anginal complaints, though there is evidence of ischaemia in the left anterior descending artery territory on exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6.5994292310457
keywords = capacity
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/305. Treatment of iatrogenic previable premature rupture of membranes with intra-amniotic injection of platelets and cryoprecipitate (amniopatch): preliminary experience.

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to describe the treatment of iatrogenic previable premature rupture of membranes with the intra-amniotic injection of platelets and cryoprecipitate (amniopatch). STUDY DESIGN: patients with iatrogenic previable premature rupture of membranes and without evidence of intra-amniotic infection underwent transabdominal intra-amniotic injection of platelets and cryoprecipitate through a 22-gauge needle. The study was approved by the Institutional review Board of St Joseph's Hospital in Tampa, florida, and all patients gave written informed consent. RESULTS: Seven patients with iatrogenic preterm premature rupture of membranes underwent placement of an amniopatch. Membrane sealing was verifiable in 6 of 7 patients. Three patients had iatrogenic preterm premature rupture of membranes after operative fetoscopy, 3 cases were after genetic amniocentesis, and 1 was after diagnostic fetoscopy. Three pregnancies progressed well, with restoration of the amniotic fluid volume and no further leakage. Two patients had unexplained fetal death despite successful sealing. One case of bladder outlet obstruction had no further leakage, but oligohydramnios persisted and did not allow unequivocal documentation of sealing. One patient miscarried from twin-twin transfusion, but the amniotic cavity was sealed. CONCLUSIONS: Iatrogenic preterm premature rupture of membranes can be treated effectively with an amniopatch. The technique is simple and does not require knowledge of the exact location of the defect. Unexpected fetal death from the procedure may be attributable to vasoactive effects of platelets or indigo carmine. Although the appropriate dose of platelets and cryoprecipitate needs to be established, the amniopatch may mean that iatrogenic preterm premature rupture of membranes no longer needs to be considered a devastating complication of pregnancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/305. Secondary reconstruction of a giant congenital lentiginous dermal nevus with serial, large-volume tissue expansion.

    Giant congenital pigmented nevi pose a substantial reconstructive challenge for the treating physician. Due to the increased risk of malignant transformation in such lesions, complete excision with tissue expansion or skin grafting is the generally accepted treatment. These modalities can, however, leave the patient with secondary deformities that also require complex reconstructive procedures. The following case details a patient requiring secondary reconstruction with large-volume tissue expansion 12 years after excision of a giant nevus, and split-thickness skin grafting. This patient illustrates a severe secondary deformity and the usefulness of large-volume serial expansion in such patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 6
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/305. Living-related auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for primary sclerosing chonangitis--subsequent removal of the native liver.

    In japan, living-related auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation (APOLT) is mainly indicated for small-for-size grafts. We present the case of a 24 year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) who underwent a living-related auxiliary partial orthotopic liver transplantation for a small-for-size graft, that was subsequently excised. During the transplantation procedure, the native liver was freed from the surrounding tissues, and was only connected to the body by the right hepatic artery and right hepatic vein. The auxiliary extended left lobe graft, corresponding to 22% of the estimated recipient liver volume, was orthotopically transplanted after extended left lobectomy of the recipient native liver. Post-transplant CT-volumetry showed rapid increase of the graft volume with atrophy of the native liver, and GSA scintigraphy showed dominant function of the graft. Although hyper-bilirubinemia was prolonged by the removal of the native liver on the 18th post-transplantation day, it gradually subsided after plasmapheresis was performed twice, and the patient was discharged on the 77th post-transplantation day. We conclude, based on this case, that subsequent removal of the native liver is necessary in APOLT for patients with potential hepatic malignancies. The optimal timing of the removal of the remnant native liver should be determined based on CT-volumetry, GSA scintigraphy, and the liver biopsy specimen of the graft.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/305. Renal function in jaundiced patients: a prospective analysis.

    A prospective analysis was undertaken to assess renal function in patients with obstructive jaundice. A total of 59 jaundiced patients (serum bilirubin > 100 mumol/l) undergoing biliary decompression by surgical, endoscopic or radiological means received prophylactic fluid volume expansion (3 litres crystalloid fluid intravenously) during the 24 hours before intervention. Renal function (urea and electrolytes, creatinine, creatinine clearance, urinary output) was assessed preoperatively and on days 1-7 and on day 28 postoperatively. Two jaundiced patients (3.4%) developed renal failure (urinary output < 400 ml in 24 hours in the presence of an increased serum urea and/or creatinine) and subsequently died. The overall incidence of post-procedural renal impairment (urinary output < 800 ml in 24 hours) was 10.2%. It is concluded that, with vigilant control of fluid and electrolyte balance and pre-procedural intravenous volume expansion, the incidence of renal dysfunction in patients with obstructive jaundice is not as high as previously reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = volume
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Postoperative Complications'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.