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1/1109. Left ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit in treatment of transposition of great arteries, restrictive ventricular septal defect, and acquired pulmonary atresia.

    Progressive cyanosis after banding of the pulmonary artery in infancy occurred in a child with transposition of the great arteries and a ventricular septal defect, and a Blalock-Taussig shunt operation had to be performed. At the time of correction a segment of pulmonary artery between the left ventricle and the band was found to be completely occluded so that continuity between the left ventricle and the pulmonary artery could not be restored. A Rastelli type of operation was not feasible as the ventricular septal defect was sited low in the muscular septum. Therefore, in addition to Mustard's operation, a Dacron conduit was inserted from the left ventricle to the main pulmonary artery to relieve the obstruction. Postoperative cardiac catheterization with angiocardiography indicated a satisfactory haemodynamic result. The patient remains well 11 months after the operation. This operation, a left ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit, may be used as an alternative procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries, intact interventricular septum, and obstruction to the left ventricular outflow, if the obstruction cannot be adequately relieved.
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ranking = 1
keywords = obstruction
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2/1109. Postoperative pulmonary edema.

    BACKGROUND: Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema may be caused by upper airway obstruction due to laryngospasm after general anesthesia. This syndrome of "negative pressure pulmonary edema" is apparently well known among anesthesiologists but not by other medical specialists. methods: We reviewed the cases of seven patients who had acute pulmonary edema postoperatively. RESULTS: There was no evidence of fluid overload or occult cardiac disease, but upper airway obstruction was the most common etiology. Each patient responded quickly to therapy without complications. CONCLUSIONS: Of the seven patients with noncardiogenic postoperative pulmonary edema, at least three cases were associated with documented laryngospasm causing upper airway obstruction. This phenomenon has been reported infrequently in the medical literature and may be underdiagnosed. Immediate recognition and treatment of this syndrome are important. The prognosis for complete recovery is excellent.
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ranking = 1.7435096842607
keywords = obstruction, airway obstruction, airway
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3/1109. Early postoperative esophageal obstruction caused by enteral feeding concretions in patients who have undergone laryngectomy.

    We report two cases of tube-feeding concretions causing esophageal obstruction in patients after laryngectomy. The cause of tube-feeding concretions is unknown at this time but probably involves esophageal stasis caused by esophageal dysmotility, protein precipitation by acidic gastric contents, tube damage, and concomitant use of sucralfate and other antacids. Although this is a rare complication of nasogastric feedings, the diagnosis should be entertained in cases in which postoperative esophageal obstruction is noted in head and neck surgical patients.
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ranking = 2
keywords = obstruction
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4/1109. Negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage.

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema, a well-recognized phenomenon, is the formation of pulmonary edema following an acute upper airway obstruction (UAO). To our knowledge, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage has not been reported previously as a complication of an UAO. We describe a case of negative pressure pulmonary hemorrhage, and we propose that its etiology is stress failure, the mechanical disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane.
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ranking = 0.58116989475355
keywords = obstruction, airway obstruction, airway
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5/1109. Ogilvie's syndrome after lower extremity arthroplasty.

    OBJECTIVE: To alert surgeons who perform arthroplasty to the possibility of acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie's syndrome) after elective orthopedic procedures. To identify possible risk factors and emphasize the need for prompt recognition, careful monitoring and appropriate management so as to reduce morbidity and mortality. DESIGN: A case series. SETTING: A university-affiliated hospital that is a major referral centre for orthopedic surgery. patients: Four patients who had Ogilvie's syndrome after lower extremity arthroplasty. Of this group, 2 had primary hip arthroplasty, 1 had primary knee arthroplasty and 1 had revision hip arthroplasty. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: In all 4 patients Ogilvie's syndrome was recognized late and required surgical intervention. Two patients died as a result of postoperative complications. CONCLUSIONS: Our case series identified increasing age, immobility and patient-controlled narcotic analgesia as potential risk factors for Ogilvie's syndrome in the postoperative orthopedic patient. Prompt recognition and early consultation with frequent clinical and radiographic monitoring are necessary to avoid colonic perforation and its significant associated death rate.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = obstruction
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6/1109. Possible development of idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis.

    We report a rare case of idiopathic sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP). During a laparotomy before undergoing a distal gastrectomy with Billroth II reconstruction for early gastric cancer, the patient was found to have a membranous encapsulation wrapping each small bowel loop, unlike peritoneal encapsulation or typical SEP. He had complained of persistent heartburn, distension and diarrhea for 2 months in the post-operative course. The second laparotomy, which was performed to improve prolonged transit, revealed typical SEP with a thick and fibrotic membrane that encased the small bowel entirely. Stripping of the sclerosing encasing membrane, separation of the adherent loops of the proximal small bowel, and Braun's anastomosis were performed. The patient complained of epigastric fullness and diarrhea after he was relieved from the complete bowel obstruction for 45 days post-operatively. trimebutine maleate was administrated 5 months after the second operation and this markedly improved his symptoms. This case might reflect the developmental process of idiopathic SEP. In addition, the use of a motility regulator may improve symptoms related to the abnormal intestinal motility by this disease.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = obstruction
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7/1109. Management of ureteric obstruction in the solitary kidney by a segmental suspended ureteric prosthesis.

    Ureteric obstruction of a single kidney, secondary to an aorto-iliac bypass graft, was treated with a suspended segmentary ureteric prosthesis. No urinary stasis was observed during 1 year and the urodynamic implication are discussed.
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ranking = 1.6666666666667
keywords = obstruction
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8/1109. Intestinal blind pouch- and blind loop- syndrome in children operated previously for congenital duodenal obstruction.

    A follow-up study of 27 children operated for congenital duodenal obstruction (CDO) in the years 1953--71 is presented. Nine children belonged to the intrinsic and 18 children to the extrinsic group of CDO. A total of 7 retrocolic, isoperistaltic, side-to-side duodeno-jejunostomy, 7 Ladd's operation, 8 duodenolysis, 2 reduction of midgut volvulus, 2 duodenostomy a.m. Morton and one gastro-jejunostomy were performed at the age of 1 day--15 years. The clinical and radiological examinations were performed 3--21 years (mean 10 years 2 months) after these operations. In 3 cases there was a moderate duodenal dilatation, but reoperation was not necessary. During the follow-up period, one boy, now aged 8 years, developed a blind pouch-syndrome in the I portion of the duodenum containing a 5 x 5 cm phytobezoar 4 1/2 years after duodeno-jejunostomy. The frequency of blind pouch-syndrome after duodeno-jejunostomy was thus 1:7 or 14%. One girl, now aged 9 years, developed a blind loop-syndrome in the ileocaecal segment 3 months after side-to-side ileotransversostomy, which was performed from adhesion-obstruction after duodenolysis for malrotation I and CDO. Both the blind pouch- and the blind loop-deformation were resected and the children recovered well. To avoid blind-pouch- and blind loop-deformations in the intestines, the anastomosis must be made wide enough, and especially in the surgery of the jejuno-ileo-colic region an end-to-end anastomosis is preferable.
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ranking = 2
keywords = obstruction
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9/1109. Subaortic obstruction after the use of an intracardiac baffle to tunnel the left ventricle to the aorta.

    Postoperative hemodynamic studies in five patients document subaortic obstruction after surgical repair utilizing an intracardiac baffle to establish continuity between the left ventricle and the aorta. Four of the patients had a Rastelli procedure for D-transposition of the great arteries with a ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis; one patient had repair of double outlet right ventricle with a ventricular septal defect and pulmonary stenosis. The left ventricular outflow was shown to be a long narrow tunnel by angiography in four of five patients and by echocardiography in one patient. Resting aortic peak systolic pressure gradient ranged from 10 to 42 mm Hg (mean 24). The obstruction was localized to the proximal end of the left ventricule to aorta tunnel (i.e., at the site of ventricular septal defect) in five patients. One patient with a gradient of 42 mm Hg has angina and decreased exercise tolerance. Subaortic obstruction is a newly described sequelae after the Rastelli procedure for transposition or repair of double outlet right ventricle. The obstruction may be hemodynamically significant and should be searched for at postoperative cardiac catheterization.
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ranking = 2.6666666666667
keywords = obstruction
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10/1109. Necrotizing fasciitis of the pharynx following adenotonsillectomy.

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare clinical entity in the head and neck region. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis following adenotonsillectomy in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl. The child presented in a septic state with impending airway compromise. Computed tomography (CT) showed massive soft tissue widening with air in the retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal and retromandibular spaces. Intraoperative exploration showed necrosis of the posterior pharyngeal wall from the skull base to the cricoid, with extension into the parapharyngeal and retropharyngeal spaces. Cultures from the debrided tissues grew two aerobes and three anaerobes. Management involved airway support, surgical debridement, broad spectrum antibiotic coverage and nutritional support. The patient ultimately developed nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal stenosis requiring tracheostomy and gastrostomy tube placement. This case report highlights an extremely rare complication of adenotonsillectomy.
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ranking = 0.065994679901165
keywords = airway
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