Cases reported "Pre-Eclampsia"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/15. Renal biopsy in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    Percutaneous renal biopsy, introduced 20 years ago, has revolutionized our understanding of many diseases affecting the kidney. In studies performed in nonpregnant subjects substantial progress in defining the mechanism, prognosis and treatment of a host of renal diseases was achieved by correlating clinical findings and renal function with light, electron and immunofluorescent microscopy. In the early 1960's investigators described the renal lesions associated with preeclampsia and made initial clinicopathological correlations, but relatively few studies combining light, electron and immunofluorescent findings in pregnant women have appeared to date. This is because clinical circumstances rarely justify even the minimal risks of biopsy during gestation, and after the disease has regressed, nephrology consultation is not requested in the puerperium. In addition, a report of excessive bleeding and other complications in gravidas, although not encountered by other groups (and personal experience of the authors), has contributed to the lack of enthusiasm for renal biopsy on obstetrical services and to the belief that this procedure is not advisable both during gestation and the immediate puerperium. This article reviews the renal morphology of preeclampsia and described those aspects of it in which current knowledge is still incomplete. Indications, benefits, and risks of kidney biopsy during pregnancy or puerperium will be discussed, with emphasis on the prognostic information to be expected from the procedure which may help in predicting the outcome of future pregnancies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/15. An autopsied case of Eisenmenger syndrome complicated by recurrent thromboembolic phenomena in postpartal period.

    dyspnea, back pain, edema, and cyanosis developed suddenly in a 23-year-old woman during the last trimester of her first pregnancy. Although she had been noticed to have the enlarged heart and exertional shortness of breath to a slight degree, she had been apparently in good condition without any significant heart murmurs. Clinically, recurrent episodes of disseminated intravascular coagulation, including pulmonary thrombosis, were thought to be superimposed to Eisenmenger syndrome associated with toxemia of pregnancy. Anticoagulant and fibrinolytic treatments were tried, but their effectiveness was limited by hemorrhagic diathesis. She died of respiratory and circulatory failure after delivery of a moribund baby. autopsy revealed eisenmenger complex (a defect in the membranous portion of the interventricular septum and pulmonary vascular disease) and many fresh hemmorrhages in both lungs with a lot of new and organized thrombi. Fresh thrombi were also seen in the heart, the pancreas and the kidneys. The high peripartal mortality in Eisenmenger syndrome could be attributed to pulmonary thrombosis, which may be related to DIC, as well as to peripartal changes in circulatory function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/15. Renal involvement in primary antiphospholipid syndrome and its response to immunosuppressive therapy.

    antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association between antiphospholipid antibodies, venous and arterial thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity. Although the kidney may be affected in APS, the treatment of renal involvement is yet to be elucidated. This report describes the clinical and laboratory features of four patients with primary APS nephropathy, and the beneficial effect of immunosuppressive therapy accompanied by warfarin and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. We also briefly discuss the possible mechanisms of the beneficial effects of immunosuppressives on primary APS nephropathy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/15. Congenital solitary kidney with renovascular hypertension diagnosed by means of captopril-enhanced renography and magnetic resonance angiography.

    A 24 year-old woman had a congenital solitary kidney with renovascular hypertension due to fibromuscular dysplasia. She had been treated as having essential hypertension until she developed preeclampsia and HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome at 28 weeks of gestation. plasma renin activity and captopril test results did not indicate any abnormalities. However, renography revealed captopril-induced deterioration. magnetic resonance angiography was also useful to detect renal artery stenosis. These findings were confirmed by renal angiography. After successful percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty, her blood pressure and the pattern of captopril renography normalized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/15. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in pregnancy complicated by twin gestation and severe preeclampsia: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with a reported prevalence of 1 in 1,000, may be associated with hypertensive disease in pregnancy. The evaluation of a pregnant woman with an adult-onset genetic disorder is complex and involves counseling about inheritance, prenatal diagnosis and management of the current pregnancy. CASE: A 33-year-old woman presented for obstetric care with a history of hypertension and ADPKD for 6 years. The patient had secondary infertility, which was treated by in vitro fertilization. The case was complicated by twin gestation and superimposed severe preeclampsia, leading to preterm cesarean delivery at 26 weeks' estimated gestational age. CONCLUSION: Because of the heritable nature of ADPKD and the long-term risk of end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis and/or renal transplantation, the evaluation and counseling of women with ADPKD who are pregnant or considering pregnancy should include a discussion of the modes of inheritance, natural history, available prenatal diagnostic options, and pregnancy risks and management options. Specific counseling issues in this case include the genetic concepts of variable expression and penetrance and the medical management of chronic hypertension and preeclampsia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 108.88162086285
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/15. Darbepoetin alfa treatment for post-renal transplantation anemia during pregnancy.

    anemia is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and those who have received a kidney allograft. anemia is most prevalent in kidney transplant recipients before and immediately after transplantation, but also can occur months after transplantation if the donor kidney begins to fail. Replacement therapy for CKD-related and posttransplantation anemia is effective through the administration of exogenous erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins. Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp; Amgen Inc, Thousand Oaks, CA) is a unique erythropoiesis-stimulating protein that can be administered at an extended dosing interval relative to recombinant human erythropoietin because of its approximately 3-fold longer serum half-life. Although darbepoetin alfa has been shown to be an effective treatment for patients with anemia of CKD and anemia after kidney transplantation, limited data have been published showing efficacy in treating women with anemia of these conditions during pregnancy. We report a case of successful darbepoetin alfa treatment for severe anemia in a pregnant transplant recipient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 23.776324172571
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/15. Adverse outcomes of renovascular hypertension during pregnancy.

    BACKGROUND: A 26-year-old primigravida, with no history of hypertension, presented at 20 weeks of gestation with severe pre-eclampsia. A pelvic ultrasound revealed intrauterine fetal death, probably caused by placental abruption. The pregnancy was terminated by induction with oxytocin, followed by a vaginal breech delivery. The patient remained hypertensive for 8 weeks after delivery. INVESTIGATIONS: physical examination, laboratory investigation, renal angiogram and renal-vein renin sampling. DIAGNOSIS: An atrophic right kidney secondary to an occluded right renal artery, probably caused by dissected fibromuscular dysplasia; a contralateral high-grade stenosis secondary to fibromuscular dysplasia. MANAGEMENT: Right nephrectomy and angioplasty of the left renal artery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/15. pregnancy and postpartum after kidney transplantation and cyclosporin therapy--review of the literature adding a new case.

    The number of pregnancies after renal transplantation and immunosuppression is relative low. Since the introduction of a most effective medication, Cyclosporin A, there is not only an increasing improvement of the transplantation results, but there are also more reports on successfully concluded pregnancies. This report pertains to a 26-year old primigravida, whose pregnancy progressed without severe complications until the 33rd week of gestation. Then a sudden and rapidly worsening preeclampsia led to admission and delivery. The postoperative period was complicated by a severe septical shock. The literature is reviewed. Problems following pregnancy after kidney transplantation and triple immunotherapy with Cyclosporin A treatment are pointed out.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/15. tuberous sclerosis in pregnancy.

    tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant disorder of hamartoma formation in which manifestations may occur in skin, brain, and viscera. In the past, it was believed that the typical presentation included seizures, mental retardation, and facial angiofibromas ("adenoma sebaceum"). This disorder is now recognized to show wide variability of expression. There are only four cases of tuberous sclerosis in pregnancy in the literature. Two of these had favorable maternal and fetal outcomes and the remaining two presented with serious maternal and fetal complications. These included acute intra-abdominal bleeding due to a ruptured renal tumor, which led to renal failure requiring hemodialysis, and severe preeclampsia with pathologically enlarged kidneys noted at the time of cesarean section. This study presents two more cases of tuberous sclerosis in pregnancy. The first case had renal involvement with bleeding into a renal cyst, renal failure, preeclampsia, and severe intrauterine growth retardation. The second case was complicated by preterm premature rupture of the membranes and preterm labor. Renal involvement appears to be the single most important prognostic factor in pregnancies with tuberous sclerosis. Renal evaluation should be performed in any patient who presents for preconceptional counseling.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/15. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.

    disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is not a disease but a pathological process with widespread thrombus formation in small vessels; it occurs in many systemic conditions that stimulate the intravascular clotting mechanism. There may be widespread tissue involvement, and any tissue in the body may be affected, especially in the kidney, brain, liver, heart, and lungs. This abnormal coagulation is now commonly referred to as disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. It is prone to occur in obstetrical complications, in cancer, after transplantations, and where there has been tissue damage, such as burning, crushing, and surgery, all of which release thromboplastin into the circulation. It may also occur in Gram negative bacterial systemic infections, in antigen-antibody reactions, and in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the eye is involved, the thrombi occur in the choriocapillaris, and are usually limited to the submacular and peripapillary choroid. The anterior parts of the eye generally escape involvement. Visual symptoms may be early, and may be due to central choroidopathy or to secondary retinal detachment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = kidney
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pre-Eclampsia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.