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1/18. Poor perinatal outcome associated with maternal brucella abortus infection.

    BACKGROUND: Reports suggest that perinatal infection with brucella abortus does not cause poor obstetric outcomes, because of protective mechanisms in the human, not seen in animal species. CASE: We report a case of maternal brucellosis resulting in preterm labor, chorioamnionitis, placental abruption, and delivery of a live-born infant at 25 weeks' gestational age. Both maternal blood cultures and amniotic fluid cultures were positive for B abortus species, and delivery occurred despite aggressive antibiotic and tocolytic therapy. CONCLUSION: Maternal infection with B abortus during pregnancy can lead to significant perinatal morbidity, casting doubt on reports that human pregnancy is resistant to such infection.
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2/18. Severe pasteurella multocida infections in pregnant women.

    We report 2 cases of severe infections due to pasteurella multocida, both occurring during pregnancy in previously healthy women. Both women had contact with animals (dog and cat) but neither of them had been bitten. Apart from a slight decrease in IgG levels, no immunological defects could be detected. Both women had received oral phenoxymethylpenicillin in the early phase of the disease, but still fell ill with severe infections. One woman had meningitis while the other suffered from cellulitis with deep abscess formation.
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3/18. chlamydophila abortus infection in a pregnant woman associated with indirect contact with infected goats.

    Reported here is the case of a pregnant woman who developed a severe chlamydophila abortus infection after indirect contact with infected goats resulting in preterm stillbirth. The woman fully recovered after treatment with doxycycline. In the goat herd with which her husband worked chlamydophila abortus was actively circulating, as shown by positive serology. When pregnant women present with rapidly worsening influenza-like illness, special attention should be given to possible contact (direct or indirect) with animals when recording the anamnesis. pregnant women, especially those who live in rural areas, should generally be made aware of the risks of zoonotic diseases and how to avoid them.
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4/18. A case of intrauterine fetal death associated with maternal campylobacter coli bacteraemia.

    Campylobacter species are known to cause infectious abortion in domestic animals. In humans, Campylobacter are an important cause of enteritis, an occasional cause of systemic infection and have had a rare association with abortion and perinatal infection. A case history of spontaneous abortion, at 26 weeks' duration, associated with maternal bacteraemia, due to campylobacter coli is presented. Transmission, pathogenesis, treatment, and the need for further investigation are discussed.
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5/18. Early pregnancy loss and neonatal deaths associated with klebsiella pneumonia infection: a mini review of possible occupational health risk.

    Recurrent pregnancy loss is a disease of grave psychological and economic concern. The etiology in the vast majority of the cases is unknown or at best poorly understood. Although klebsiella pneumonia infections have been reported in humans and animals during pregnancy, there is hardly any information to indicate whether or not these infections may be responsible for early pregnancy loss. We present a review of literature and report for the first time in humans, klebsiella pneumonia infection in placenta of a 38-year-old secondary recurrent aborter (parity 2 3).
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6/18. Human parvovirus B-19: not just a pediatric problem.

    Parvoviruses have long been associated with disabling and even fatal illnesses in animals. The discovery of the human parvovirus B-19 in 1975 (1) and subsequent studies of its effects in humans identified this virus as the causative agent of erythema infectiosum ("fifth disease") in children. (2). erythema infectiosum (EI) is a common, self-limited infectious disorder in children, easily recognized by the classic "slapped cheek" facial erythema and fine reticular rash. Only in the 1980s have further investigations linked HPV B-19 infection with more significant clinical syndromes, among which is an adult polyarthropathy. This presentation in adults is more common than is currently understood and is easily confused with other symmetric polyarthropathies. Recognition and conservative treatment of this disorder are important for the emergency physician, to whom these patients may present.
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7/18. Vertical transmission of fatal rift valley fever in a newborn.

    rift valley fever (RVF) is a viral disease transmitted to humans by mosquito bite and contact with animals or their infected tissues. Other modes of transmission include aerosol inhalation and possibly ingestion of raw milk from infected animals. We present a 5-day-old neonate with fatal RVF. Onset of the infant's illness on the 2nd day of life combined with positive RVF-IgM and serological evidence of maternal disease supports vertical transmission.
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8/18. Confirmed rabies exposure during pregnancy: treatment with human rabies immune globulin and human diploid cell vaccine.

    A review of the literature shows 24 cases of pregnant human exposure to rabies virus through confirmed rabid animal bites. Historically, these patients received passive immunization with equine rabies immunoglobulin and/or purified vero cell vaccine or duck embryo vaccine. With the recent development of human-derived rabies vaccines, we report an additional case of human gestational rabies exposure, which was treated with human rabies immune globulin and human diploid cell vaccine.
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9/18. Leptomyxid ameba, a new agent of amebic meningoencephalitis in humans and animals.

    Amebae belonging to the order Leptomyxida are regarded as innocuous soil organisms incapable of infecting mammals. We report here the isolation of a leptomyxid ameba from the brain of a pregnant baboon (papio sphinx) that died of meningoencephalitis at the San Diego Zoo Wild Animal Park. By using rabbit anti-leptomyxid serum in the immunofluorescence assay, we have identified the leptomyxid ameba in the brain sections of a number of human encephalitic cases from around the world as well as a few cases of meningoencephalitis in animals in the united states, which suggests that the leptomyxid amebae are potential etiologic agents of fatal meningoencephalitis in humans and animals.
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keywords = animal
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10/18. Perinatal group B streptococcal infections across intact amniotic membranes.

    We reviewed the perinatal mortality due to group B streptococcal infection over a three-year period at a tertiary center. In 6 of 16 perinatal deaths due to group B streptococcus, representing a range of gestational ages, infection occurred with the membranes intact. A review of reports from the obstetric and pediatric literature revealed that 10-50% of group B streptococcal infections occur in this manner. Several investigators of both animals and humans have demonstrated the pathophysiology of an ascending transamniotic infection. The current series emphasized this mode of infection in group B streptococcal disease.
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