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11/18. Human infection with streptococcus zooepidemicus (Lancefield group C): three case reports.

    Three unrelated severe infections with streptococcus zooepidemicus occurred in england in 1985. The first patient developed septic arthritis, which has not been recorded before with this organism. The second died with septicaemia, pneumonia and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, the only record so far of nephritis following sporadic S. zooepidemicus infection and of nephritis and systemic sepsis in the same patient. The third patient experienced septicaemia during pregnancy but recovered without complications. A likely animal source of infection was found in only one case.
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12/18. listeriosis.

    Four patients with listeria monocytogenes infection are presented; three of whom had associated lymphoproliferative disorders. Two of the four patients had Listeria meningitis. meningitis is the most common manifestation of listeriosis in humans. Specific diagnosis depends on demonstrating listeria monocytogenes in the cerebral spinal fluid; differentiation from other forms of acute meningitis cannot be made clinically. Although listeriosis is recognized as a major global problem in both human and animal health, the epidemiology of human infection is poorly understood. animals and animal products may serve as reservoirs for human infection. Antibiotic therapy resulted in recovery in three of the patients. The history, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, clinical manifestations, and therapy of listeriosis are reviewed.
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13/18. Septic abortion associated with campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus infection: case report and review of the literature.

    In contrast to the situation in cattle, goat and sheep, campylobacter fetus subspecies fetus only rarely causes disease in humans. While a major inducer of septic abortion in animals, only a minority of clinical infections in humans are found during pregnancy. Eleven cases have so far been described in pregnant women. Clinical symptomatology is usually mild during gestation but often leads to premature labor. Here we present a multigravida with positive cultures for C. fetus who went into septic shock. She completely recovered after delivery of a C. fetus-infected fetus at 18 weeks' gestation and treatment with a combination of cephazolin and gentamicin. C. fetus infections should be suspected in patients with intensive contact with (infected) cattle or after intake of unpasteurized dairy products.
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keywords = animal
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14/18. orf virus infection in pregnancy.

    orf virus infection is endemic among sheep and goats, and can occur in humans who handle these animals. orf virus infection in humans causes a characteristic skin lesion, and systemic symptoms can occur. Very little is known about orf virus infection in human pregnancy. A case of orf virus infection, with onset at 33 weeks gestation, is presented. There were no pathological findings in the infant born at term, or in the placenta.
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keywords = animal
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15/18. pasteurella multocida--an uncommon cause of obstetric and gynaecological sepsis.

    pasteurella multocida is a common cause of wound infection following animal-inflicted wounds, but is a rare cause of female genito-urinary sepsis. We present a case of vulval sepsis and a case of intrapartum septicaemia with this bacterium. These two cases indicate that pasteurella multocida can occasionally colonise the female lower genital tract and this bacterium should be considered in the differential diagnosis of serious infection related to this site.
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keywords = animal
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16/18. fluconazole-induced congenital anomalies in three infants.

    fluconazole has been associated with various teratisms in animals, including craniofacial ossification defects, thin, wavy ribs, and renal pelvis defects. We describe three infants born to women who were receiving fluconazole through or beyond the first trimester of pregnancy. All of the infants had congenital anomalies; no other drug was implicated. Only one of the three infants survived. Their anomalies, similar to those observed in animal studies, were largely craniofacial, skeletal (i.e., thin, wavy ribs and ossification defects), and cardiac. One of these infants was previously reported as having Antley-Bixler syndrome; however, given the chronology described herein and the similarity of this infant to the others, we conclude that her deformities also represent the potent teratogenic effect of fluconazole.
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17/18. Hydroxamic acid: a potential human teratogen that could be recommended to treat ureaplasma.

    Hydroxamic acid has been shown in experimental animals to be teratogenic. It can be used to treat chronic cervicitis; extreme caution is recommended to avoid exposure to this potential human teratogen.
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18/18. Gestational psittacosis in a montana sheep rancher.

    In humans, psittacosis is primarily a flulike illness following exposure to psittacine birds. In rare cases, pregnant women exposed to chlamydia psittaci can contract gestational psittacosis: atypical pneumonia, sepsis, and placental insufficiency resulting in premature birth or miscarriage. In the united states, only two cases of gestational psittacosis have been reported, both from exposure to psittacine birds. Eleven other cases have been reported worldwide, mostly in the United Kingdom, all from exposure to infected birth fluids and membranes of farm mammals, notably sheep and goats. In these mammals, C. psittaci inhabit the reproductive tract, are transmitted sexually or by the fecal-oral route, and cause miscarriages. The case of gestational psittacosis in a montana sheep rancher is the first farm animal-related case reported in the united states. pregnant women should avoid close contact with C. psittaci-infected animals, particularly sheep and goats during the birthing season. Obstetricians should consider this diagnosis along with early antibiotic treatment and cesarean section delivery in the context of the patient's case history.
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keywords = animal
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