Cases reported "Pregnancy Complications"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/17. electroconvulsive therapy during the third trimester of pregnancy.

    ECT was administered in two patients during the third trimester of pregnancy. Patient A experienced uterine contractions following the second, third, and sixth treatments. Tocolytic therapy was needed only after the third treatment. Also, following the third treatment, we observed decreased fetal heart rate variability and uterine contraction-related late cardiac deceleration, which indicated fetal compromise. Following the sixth treatment, there was an insignificant drop in biophysical profile score. No such effects were noted with Patient B despite risk factors for premature labor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/17. pregnancy in women with noonan syndrome: report of two cases.

    BACKGROUND: noonan syndrome is similar phenotypically to turner syndrome, accounting for one in 1000-2500 live births. Two thirds of patients have cardiac anomalies, half with pulmonary stenosis. Two cases of noonan syndrome in pregnancy are presented, each woman with a different cardiac anomaly. CASES: The first patient sought preconception counseling for pulmonary stenosis. She conceived within a year and had a cesarean because of prolonged rupture of membranes, transverse lie, and variable decelerations. The second patient presented at 14 weeks' gestation with an unrepaired coarctation of the aorta. She had an assisted vaginal delivery at 38 weeks. CONCLUSION: Successful pregnancy was possible in women with noonan syndrome. A coordinated multidisciplinary team approach improved the likelihood of a successful outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/17. diagnosis and management of primary aldosteronism in pregnancy: case report and review of the literature.

    Primary aldosteronism rarely complicates pregnancy. We present a woman with primary aldosteronism in pregnancy associated with severe preeclampsia. A 33-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension was referred to our hospital at 25 weeks of gestation. Her blood pressure was 180/100 mmHg, and laboratory tests identified a low serum potassium level and moderate proteinuria on urinalysis. The fetus was diagnosed with growth restriction. Plasma renin activity (PRA) value was 2.2 ng/mL/h and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) was elevated (260 pg/mL). The patient was treated medically. At 27 weeks of gestation, we noted persistent late fetal heart rate decelerations associated with uterine contractions. Therefore, elective caesarean section was performed and she was delivered of a 698-g female. After delivery, PRA declined and PAC remained elevated. Abdominal computerized tomography scan and I131-iodochoresterol scan revealed a tumor in the left adrenal gland. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and confirmed the clinical diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/17. fetal heart rate decelerations during ECT-induced seizures: is it important?

    electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is sometimes indicated during pregnancy and may offer advantages over pharmacotherapy for the patient and the fetus (1,2). However, very little data is available on the impact of epileptic or ECT-induced seizures on the fetus. We report a case of brief fetal heart rate decelerations in a fetus associated with maternal ECT-induced convulsions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/17. Severe allergy in a pregnant woman after vaginal examination with a latex glove.

    Recently case reports about latex allergy were increased. We have experienced severe latex allergy in a pregnant women after vaginal examination with a latex glove. A 33-year-old woman, 38 weeks pregenant, was hospitalized for management of fetal IUGR. She underwent a vaginal examination with a latex glove and soon developed severe anaphylactic reactions. Although two hours later her condition had remarkably improved, regular uterine contractions appeared, and fetal cardiotocogram showed late decelerations. So emergency cesarean section was performed under the situation without using any latex products. She delivered a male infant weighing 2,227 g (-2.21 SD) at 38 weeks gestation. His apgar score was 5 points at 1 min and 8 points at 5 min. The latex-specific IgE of this patient was high and IgE for banana, avocado and kiwi were also positive. These foods showed cross-reactions with latex, but she had no history of allergic reactions against these foods. She had a history of atopic reactions and of atopic dermatitis while working as a nurse at the ICU. It is thought that this patient was in the high-risk group.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/17. Expectant management of uterine dehiscence in the second trimester of pregnancy.

    BACKGROUND: Uterine dehiscence and rupture are serious complications of pregnancy after a cesarean delivery. Management of uterine dehiscence diagnosed in second trimester can be controversial. CASE: A woman with a previous cesarean delivery was diagnosed with a uterine dehiscence at 20 weeks in the area of her prior cesarean incision. Although she was counseled regarding risks to herself and the fetus, she decided to continue the pregnancy. She was, therefore, managed expectantly until 31 weeks and delivered by cesarean because of fetal heart rate decelerations. The infant did well and was discharged home at 3 weeks of age. The patient remained asymptomatic after delivery. CONCLUSION: With close monitoring, expectant management of uterine dehiscence diagnosed in the second trimester is possible.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/17. A case report: change in fetal heart rate pattern on spontaneous uterine rupture at 35 weeks gestation after laparoscopically assisted myomectomy.

    A 31-year-old nulligravid woman who underwent laparoscopically assisted myomectomy 5 months before becoming pregnant suffered uterine rupture at 35 weeks gestation. A 50 g intramuscular myomatous node had been removed laparoscopically. Early signs of rupture included sudden onset of severe abdominal tenderness and frequent uterine contractions despite reassuring FHR tracing. Variable deceleration was observed as late as 7.5 hours after onset. Emergency cesarean section was performed due to increasing severity of tenderness, revealing complete uterine rupture at the fundus site without extrusion of the fetus or placenta. A male neonate (2,860 g) was delivered without asphyxia and an apgar score of 8. Total volume of hemorrhage was approximately 50 ml. The ruptured uterine wall was repaired by suturing in 2 layers. The present case indicates that sudden onset of abdominal tenderness in pregnant women with a history of laparoscopic myomectomy may suggest uterine rupture even in the presence of reassuring FHR. This is a rare case, as non-reassuring FHR patterns generally appear in the late stages of uterine rupture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/17. Obstructive sleep apnea in pregnancy.

    A 25-year-old woman, gravida 4 para 2, at 37 weeks gestation was evaluated and treated for preeclampsia. Overnight, the patient had a witnessed apneic episode with maternal oxygen desaturation and concurrent fetal heart rate deceleration. She subsequently delivered an infant that was small for gestational age. This is the first case described with confirmed obstructive sleep apnea by formal polysomnography and witnessed maternal desaturation with fetal heart rate decelerations. Recognizing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) early in gestation will help dictate treatment options and may prevent adverse maternal fetal outcomes. continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) seems to be a safe treatment with minimal adverse effects. Questioning of patients at the first prenatal visit and monitoring for increased snoring during gestation may help detect early signs and symptoms of OSA. Treatment of OSA with CPAP might improve perinatal outcomes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/17. sjogren's syndrome diagnosed in pregnancy: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: As in most other autoimmune diseases, sjogren's syndrome is seen predominantly in women. Since the peak age is around the late reproductive and early postmenopausal period, the obstetric aspect has not been well studied. CASE: A 28-years-old woman, pregnant for 22 weeks and 5 days, was admitted with worsening general status, skin lesions, arthralgias, and oral and ocular symptoms typical of sjogren's syndrome. She underwent hemodialysis for renal insufficiency. To prevent autoantibody formation, progression of the disease, therapy with methyl prednisolone, 100 mg/d intravenously; cyclophosphamide, 500 mg/month in a single intravenous application; hemodialysis 3 times a week; and plasmapheresis 7 times was instituted. An 1,100-g, male infant at 27 weeks and 5 days was delivered by cesarean section because of premature preterm rupture of membranes and severe late decelerations on cardiotocography. The infant was discharged from the neonatal intensive care unit after 30 days, weighing 1,800 g. Postnatal echocardiographic examination of the infant revealed neither cardiac malformations nor arrhythmias. CONCLUSION: Since the presence of autoantibodies against SS-A and SS-B are reported to accompany congenital heart block, the primary goal of therapy should be preventing this untoward effect of the disease. Close monitoring during pregnancy is mandatory to detect preeclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm labor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/17. pregnancy complicated by uterine synechiae after endometrial ablation.

    BACKGROUND: The use of endometrial ablation is becoming more common in the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding. As a result, an increasing number of reproductive-aged women are electing to have an endometrial ablation. Women who undergo this procedure should be informed that desired fertility is a contraindication because endometrial ablation can significantly increase the risk of obstetric complications. This is the first reported pregnancy complicated by uterine synechiae in a patient with a history of an endometrial ablation (medline search, January 1985 to June 2004, key words "pregnancy," "obstetric," "endometrial ablation," "complications," and "hysteroscopy"). CASE: A 34-year-old multigravida was referred to labor and delivery at 24 and weeks after ultrasound findings of a shortened cervix, multiple uterine synechiae, and multiple fetal anomalies. Two weeks after admission, she experienced preterm premature rupture of membranes with subsequent variable decelerations requiring delivery via classical cesarean. The fetal malformations were attributed to the multiple uterine synechiae caused by the previous endometrial ablation. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the significant morbidity and mortality associated with a pregnancy complicated by uterine synechiae after an endometrial ablation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = deceleration
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pregnancy Complications'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.