Cases reported "Pregnancy Complications"

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1/216. Massive rectal bleeding due to jejunal and colonic tuberculosis.

    A case of massive rectal bleeding due to colonic tuberculosis in advanced pregnancy with intrauterine foetal death is reported. Patient was treated with resection of the left colon and left transverse end colostomy with closure of the rectal stump. hysterotomy for the removal of the dead foetus was performed. The patient improved in health with antitubercular treatment. The colorectal anastomosis was performed after 4 months. Massive rectal bleeding in intestinal tuberculosis, though rare should be kept in mind.
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keywords = death
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2/216. Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase deficiency: variable expressivity of maternal illness during pregnancy and unusual presentation with infantile cholestasis and hypocalcaemia.

    patients with long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase (LCHAD) deficiency present with a Reye-like syndrome, cardiomyopathy, or sudden unexpected death. We describe an unusual presentation in a patient with unsuspected LCHAD deficiency. The proband presented at 2 months of age with an acute infantile hypocalcaemia and vitamin d deficiency associated with occult, unexplained cholestatic liver disease. Sudden, unexpected death occurred at 8 months. Molecular analysis revealed homozygosity for the prevalent LCHAD (1528G > C, E474Q) mutation. The mother had pre-eclampsia during the third trimester of her pregnancy. In a subsequent pregnancy, she developed severe acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP) and intrauterine fetal death at 33 weeks of gestation. In conclusion, infantile hypocalcaemia is an unusual phenotype associated with LCHAD deficiency. The maternal pregnancy history documents that fetal LCHAD deficiency is associated with a spectrum of maternal illnesses ranging from pre-eclampsia to life-threatening AFLP.
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keywords = death
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3/216. A staff dialogue on a socially distanced patient: psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and caregivers.

    Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery, which provides hope to the patient, support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. The following case of an hiv-positive woman who was diagnosed with cervical cancer during a twin pregnancy was discussed at the May, 1999 Schwartz Center Rounds. The patient was in drug rehabilitation having been dependent on crack cocaine, with a past history of syphilis and gonorrhea. She was single and her other children were in foster care. Initially she was suspicious and non-compliant. A plan was negotiated to biopsy the cervical lesion after cesarean section and with confirmation of malignancy she underwent radical surgery and subsequently radiotherapy. Despite the almost insurmountable social and educational distance between her and her caregivers, they managed to bond and facilitate care. Although there were compromises with which staff were uncomfortable, the relationship was maintained and continues.
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keywords = death
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4/216. Recurrent fetal thyrotoxicosis in a woman with Graves' disease: case report.

    The thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins are generally believed to be the cause of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease. Placental transfer of these antibodies from a mother with autoimmune thyroid disease can result in fetal thyroid disorders. We report the case of a 31-year-old woman who had a history of Graves' disease. She received thyroxine therapy for post thyroidectomy hypothyroidism. Two years after the thyroidectomy, she became pregnant. Unfortunately, intrauterine fetal death occurred in midgestation. One year later, she became pregnant again. In the 26th week of gestation, fetal thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed using clinical pictures, including fetal tachycardia and cardiomegaly, and a hormonal evaluation of a periumbilical blood sampling (T4: 18 micrograms/dl, T3: 65.3 ng/dl, TSH: < 0.03 microU/ml) was performed. Antimicrosomal antibodies were not detectable in either the maternal or fetal blood. In this case, high levels of TBII were detected during pregnancy and crossed the placenta to result in a thyrotoxic fetus in the second pregnancy. We recommend that both the regular monitoring of the thyrotropin receptor antibodies of pregnant women with a history of autoimmune thyroid disease, and routine measurements of the fetal heart rate and intrauterine growth during gestation be mandatory for the early detection of fetal thyroid disorders. cordocentesis for measuring fetal thyroid function is helpful in reaching a definite diagnosis and for guiding therapy.
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keywords = death
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5/216. Report on intrauterine drug exposure during second trimester of pregnancy in a heroin-associated death.

    A 17-year-old girl was found dead in a public toilet with fresh needle puncture marks. She was 18-20 weeks pregnant with a male fetus. Drug screening of her blood and urine indicated recent heroin use. Chronic drug use was confirmed by hair analysis. amniotic fluid as well as fetal and maternal tissues and body fluids were analyzed by GC/MS and HPLC. All the fetal specimens were investigated, and the following levels of drugs were found: 6-monoacetyl-morphine (blood: 152 ng/g; amniotic fluid: 128 ng/g; brain: 140 ng/g; lung: 110 ng/g; liver: 2 ng/g; kidney: 40 ng/g), morphine (blood: 1360 ng/g; amniotic fluid: 604 ng/g; brain: 710 ng/g; lung: 1030 ng/g; liver: 2060 ng/g; kidney: 1100 ng/g), codeine (blood: 70 ng/g; brain: 60 ng/g; lung: 60 ng/g; liver: 90 ng/g; kidney: 70 ng/g), and morphine-3-glucuronide (amniotic fluid: 209 ng/g; brain: 170 ng/g; lung: 325 ng/g; kidney: 231 ng/g). morphine-6-glucuronide was present in the maternal circulation but could not be detected in the fetal circulation.
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keywords = death
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6/216. Congenital hyperthyroidism: autopsy report.

    We report the autopsy of a stillborn fetus with congenital hyperthyroidism born to a mother with untreated Graves' disease, whose cause of death was congestive heart failure. The major findings concerned the skull, thyroid, heart, and placenta. The cranial sutures were closed, with overlapping skull bones. The thyroid was increased in volume and had intense blood congestion. Histological examination showed hyperactive follicles. The heart was enlarged and softened, with dilated cavities and hemorrhagic suffusions in the epicardium. The placenta had infarctions that involved at least 20% of its surface, and the vessels of the umbilical cord were fully exposed due to a decrease in Wharton's jelly. hyperthyroidism was confirmed by the maternal clinical data, the fetal findings of exophthalmia, craniosynostosis, and goiter with signs of follicular hyperactivity. Craniosynostosis is caused by the anabolic action of thyroid hormones in bone formation during the initial stages of development. The delayed initiation of treatment in the present case contributed to the severity of fetal hyperthyroidism and consequent fetal death.
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ranking = 2
keywords = death
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7/216. Gangrenous sigmoid volvulus in a pregnant woman.

    A rare case of gangrenous sigmoid volvulus in a pregnant woman causing intestinal obstruction is reported. The patient had intrauterine foetal death. Laparatomy for resection of sigmoid colon and hysterotomy for removal of dead foetus was carried out. Terminal iliac colostomy with closure of rectal stump was done in the first surgery. The patient underwent colorectal anastomosis 2 months after the first operation and recovered uneventfully.
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ranking = 1
keywords = death
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8/216. pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy: a case report and review of literature.

    pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an uncommon, immune-mediated bullous dermatosis, which, during its active phase, has been associated with infertility. pemphigus vulgaris during pregnancy is exceedingly rare-only 26 cases with immunopathological confirmation have been reported. The disease may be associated with adverse neonatal outcome, including prematurity and fetal death. Transient skin lesions may occasionally appear in the neonate. We report a patient who conceived during the active phase of PV, required high doses of corticosteroids to control the disease, and was delivered of a pre-term, appropriate-for-gestational age newborn.
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9/216. perinatal mortality and maternal mortality at the Provincial Hospital, Quang Ngai, South vietnam, 1967-1970.

    The perinatal mortality, maternal mortality, infant mortality rates, and the complications of delivery at the Provincial Hospital of Quang Ngai, South vietnam are described. The perinatal mortality is the only valid statistic available as the infant usually leaves the hospital within three days of delivery. knowledge pertaining to the 4th to 28th day after birth is scanty and there is insufficient knowledge about the first year of life. infant mortality is estimated at 277 per 1,000 live births. The perinatal mortality 64.6 per 1,000 live births, and maternal mortality, 106 per 10,000 live births are extremely high in contrast to Western countries. The high perinatal mortality is attributable to deaths during birth, the neonatal and immediate postnatal period. The high maternal mortality is primarily due to caesarean section, anemia, uterine rupture, toxemia, post-partum hemorrhage and puerperal infection.
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10/216. Hemophagocytic syndrome in pregnancy.

    BACKGROUND: Hemophagocytic syndrome is characterized by nonmalignant histiocytes that undergo uncontrolled phagocytosis of normal hematopoietic cells. Clinical severity ranges from complete recovery to rapid deterioration and death. CASE: thrombocytopenia was discovered upon routine initial prenatal evaluation of a 24-year-old, gravida 2, para 1, at 29 weeks' gestation with a history of necrotizing lymphadenitis. Cytopenia and elevated transaminases developed, followed by hyperpyrexia. The patient delivered and her postpartum course was complicated by coagulopathy, multiorgan failure, and death. bone marrow biopsy confirmed hemophagocytic syndrome. CONCLUSION: early diagnosis of hemophagocytic syndrome during pregnancy might be helped by recognizing symptoms and signs, including a history of necrotizing lymphadenitis, and obtaining a bone marrow biopsy.
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ranking = 2
keywords = death
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