Cases reported "Pregnancy Complications"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/89. Infiltration block for caesarean section in a morbidly obese parturient.

    We report a case of a morbidly obese parturient (150 kg and 150 cm) for emergency lower segment caesarean section for dead foetus. Her pregnancy had been unsupervised. She presented with severe pre-eclampsia, generalized oedema and acute respiratory failure. Caesarean section was performed under infiltration block using lidocaine 0.5-1.0%. Her status improved postoperatively with aggressive physiotherapy, nursing in a semirecumbent position and oxygen supplementation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/89. Transplacental passage of anti-thyroid auto-antibodies in a pregnant woman with auto-immune thyroid disease.

    We report the intra-uterine and postnatal thyroid status of a newborn, whose mother, affected with Hashimoto's thyroiditis superimposed on a previous Graves' disease, again became hyperthyroid during the third trimester of pregnancy. The mother had very high levels of anti-thyroid auto-antibodies, including TSH receptor auto-antibodies (TRAb) measured as TSH-binding inhibiting auto-antibodies (TBIAb). In order to exclude fetal thyroid dysfunction due to passive transplacental transfer of TRAb, fetal blood samples were obtained by cordocentesis at 21, 27 and 32 weeks of gestation. A transplacental transfer of TRAb was already seen at 21 weeks, but no alteration of fetal thyroid function was present at that time. In the following weeks, a rise in TRAb and circulating thyroid hormones was observed both in the fetus and mother, accompanied by overt hyperthyroidism in the mother and by growth retardation in the fetus. At birth, TRAb were shown to have stimulating activity both in the newborn and mother. This report documents the early transplacental passage of thyroid auto-antibodies and underlines the importance of close follow-up of pregnant women with auto-immune thyroid disorders.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/89. Obstetrical anesthesia for a parturient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and third ventriculostomy.

    PURPOSE: To describe the anesthetic considerations for a primiparous woman whose history included four neurosurgeries: ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt insertion, evacuation of a subdural hematoma, shunt revision, and third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus secondary to aqueductal stenosis. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 37-yr-old GI, P0 woman with a VP shunt and third ventriculostomy was assessed in the Obstetrical anesthesia Clinic at 36 wk. gestation to consider analgesic options for labour and delivery and review anesthetic management in the event that an operative delivery was required. A third ventriculostomy had been performed when increased intracranial pressure and neurological symptoms reappeared despite the previous VP shunt. Pregnancy was uneventful and vaginal delivery was anticipated. She presented in spontaneous labour at 40 wk. gestation. She declined analgesia throughout her four and a half hour labour A mediolateral episiotomy was performed to facilitate spontaneous delivery of a 4,182 g female infant. Mother and baby were discharged home without incident after two days. She denied any problems, including headaches, on follow up at two and four weeks. CONCLUSION: A review of the literature concerning pregnant patients with shunts found that both regional and general anesthesia has been used with no reports of complications directly related to anesthesia. No published cases describing labour analgesia for patients with third ventriculostomy were found. Two neurosurgeons advised that regional anesthesia was not contraindicated in such patients and that analgesia should be based on obstetrical considerations and the neurological status of the patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/89. Perioperative assessment of fetal heart rate and uterine activity.

    Improvements in surgical techniques and anesthesia allow women the option to schedule needed surgery during pregnancy. However, perioperative monitoring of the fetus and uterine activity remains a matter of controversy. Monitoring may allow rapid improvement of the fetal status or uterine activity when early compromise or contractions are detected. The reassurance and decreased medicolegal risks provided by perioperative monitoring may offset the cost of a perinatal nurse and use of monitoring equipment even though the drug and anesthetic effect on the fetal heart limit the benefits of monitoring. Simply providing adequate maternal respiratory support during surgery may improve the fetal pattern but will not eliminate external surgical effects. The need for additional research is described, and the role of the perinatal nurse is detailed in a suggested protocol.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/89. Successful pregnancy in a patient with polycystic kidney disease and advanced renal failure without prophylactic dialysis.

    Pregnancies in women suffering from advanced chronic renal failure are frequently associated with deterioration of maternal renal function, premature births and low birth weights. Prophylactic dialysis is sometimes instituted since this intervention ameliorates the uremic milieu and improves maternal status and fetal uterine environment. This report describes a successful pregnancy and delivery in a hypertensive woman with advanced chronic renal failure due to polycystic kidney disease without accelerating the natural deterioration of renal function and without instituting prophylactic dialysis. The infant was delivered at full term with a normal birth weight. Thirty months after delivery, growth and development of the child were normal and the rate of deterioration of maternal renal function, assessed by 1/creatinine, was unaffected by pregnancy. Conservative management and effective control of blood pressure may be sufficient to achieve successful pregnancy outcome when women with advanced chronic renal failure become pregnant.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/89. Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for labor and cesarean delivery in a patient with guillain-barre syndrome.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The anesthetic management of labor, delivery, and cesarean delivery in patients with active or resolving guillain-barre syndrome is not well defined. Using a combined spinal and epidural (CSE) technique in such a rare clinical situation has not been previously reported. CASE REPORT: A 32-year-old woman gravida 2, para 0 was diagnosed with guillain-barre syndrome at 21 weeks of pregnancy. paralysis spread up to the T4 level. Three months later, she was admitted for labor at term. She presented in severe labor pain and it was decided to proceed with CSE analgesia. No unusual hemodynamic instability, signs of autonomic dysfunction, or increased sensitivity to local anesthetics was noted. After several hours, delivery by cesarean section was required and epidural anesthesia was then used. The patient had an uncomplicated postpartum course. CONCLUSION: Careful evaluation and documentation of the patient's baseline neurological status, a thorough discussion with the patient regarding the risks and benefits of the technique for labor analgesia, and an appreciation of the limited experience with this kind of clinical situation are important.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/89. bulimia nervosa during pregnancy: a review.

    pregnant women with bulimia nervosa present interesting practice challenges for dietitians and healthcare professionals due to potential complications of bulimia nervosa for both mothers and fetuses. This review summarizes case study reports, case series reports, and retrospective studies of women with bulimia nervosa during pregnancy, and focuses on relationships among bulimic behaviors, pregnancy results, and birth outcomes. Pregnancy and birth outcomes of women with bulimia nervosa varied among individuals and studies. Material outcomes of concern included miscarriages, inappropriate weight gains (excessive or inadequate), complicated deliveries, and resumed and/or continued bulimic behaviors shortly after parturition. Fetal complications included low birth weights, prematurity, malformations, and low Apgar scores. Screening to detect bulimic behaviors is recommended, as is multidisciplinary treatment of pregnant women with bulimia nervosa to emphasize adequate dietary intakes, promote appropriate weight gains, and help achieve healthy infant outcomes in addition to long-term, healthy eating habits for these women. Future research regarding maternal and fetal outcomes of women with bulimia nervosa during pregnancy, conducted by registered dietitians, is needed to provide greater clarity and understanding of the impact of bulimic behaviors, dietary intakes, and nutritional status during pregnancy on maternal and fetal health.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 551.79636624768
keywords = nutritional status, status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/89. Neonatal lupus erythematosus: factors which may lead to clinical disease in the foetus even in the absence of disease in the mother.

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) occurs in neonates of mothers who, in almost all cases, have auto-antibodies to the SSA/Ro associated proteins, but who may have no clinical disease. However, only a small percentage of mothers with SSA/Ro antibodies have affected babies, predisposing factors specific to the foetus or neonate (i.e. HLA pattern) and/or fetal maternal interactions have been proposed to be important. We present a mother with a family history of autoimmune disease, but without clinical disease, whose baby developed cutaneous NLE. Autoantibody determinations as well as the HLA-DR/DQ were performed in the mother and baby. Factors other than the HLA-DR/DQ status of the mother appear to be important in determining whether or not the neonate will develop NLE. Auto-antibodies to endogenous antigens common to the mother, transiently expressed developmental antigens, and the isotype specificity of transferred antibodies may be important in determining disease in the baby.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/89. Changing thyroid status related to pregnancy.

    A case of post-thyroidectomy hypothyroidism is reported. The patient became euthyroid in three consecutive pregnancies, reverting to hypothyroid within three months of delivery on each occasion. The alteration in thyroid status is attributed to pregnancy related changes in antibody titres, though the laboratory data to confirm this are not available.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/89. Mechanical ventilation during pregnancy using a helium-oxygen mixture in a patient with respiratory failure due to status asthmaticus.

    The authors present a 15-year-old with a second trimester intrauterine pregnancy who developed respiratory failure as the result of status asthmaticus and the development of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation was provided with a combination of oxygen and helium to facilitate gas exchange and limit peak inflating pressures. The physiologic basis for helium's potential beneficial effects on gas exchange are reviewed. Previous reports concerning the use of helium during mechanical ventilation as well as the techniques of delivery are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = status
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pregnancy Complications'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.