Cases reported "Prenatal Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/8. Fetal trauma: brain imaging in four neonates.

    The purpose of this paper is to describe brain pathology in neonates after major traffic trauma in utero during the third trimester. Our patient cohort consisted of four neonates born by emergency cesarean section after car accident in the third trimester of pregnancy. The median gestational age ( n=4) was 36 weeks (range: 30-38). Immediate post-natal and follow-up brain imaging consisted of cranial ultrasound ( n=4), computed tomography (CT) ( n=1) and post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ( n=1). pathology findings were correlated with the imaging findings ( n=3). Cranial ultrasound demonstrated a huge subarachnoidal hemorrhage ( n=1), subdural hematoma ( n=1), brain edema with inversion of the diastolic flow ( n=1) and severe ischemic changes ( n=1). In one case, CT demonstrated the presence and extension of the subarachnoidal hemorrhage, a parietal fracture and a limited intraventricular hemorrhage. Cerebellar hemorrhage and a small cerebral frontal contusion were seen on post-mortem MRI in a child with a major subarachnoidal hemorrhage on ultrasound. None of these four children survived (three children died within 2 days and one child died after 1 month). Blunt abdominal trauma during pregnancy can cause fetal cranial injury. In our cases, skull fracture, intracranial hemorrhage and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were encountered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/8. Fetal intracranial injuries in a preterm infant after maternal motor vehicle accident: a case report.

    OBJECTIVE: To present a case of fetal intracranial injuries in a preterm infant after maternal motor vehicle accident and to review the relevant literature. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: Neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit of a children's hospital. PATIENT: Preterm infant (gestational age, 30-6/7 wks) with intracranial injuries after maternal motor vehicle accident. RESULTS: Whereas the mother had only a closed femur fracture, her infant sustained subdural, subarachnoid, and intracerebral hemorrhages in the left parietal and temporal lobes most likely attributable to direct fetal trauma. Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage may have led additionally to hypoxia-ischemia contributing indirectly to the injury. At the last follow-up visit (chronological age, 20 months; corrected age, 18 months), there was evidence of a persistent right-sided hemiparesis in an otherwise normally developed infant. CONCLUSIONS: Motor vehicle accidents during pregnancy can be associated with fetal mortality and significant morbidity, even in the absence of severe maternal injuries. Direct (hemorrhagic) and indirect (hypoxic-ischemic) intracranial injuries should be actively sought with appropriate imaging studies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0030076058669707
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/8. Insignificant blunt maternal trauma with lethal fetal outcome: a case report.

    We report a case of a twenty-nine-week breech fetus with skull fracture, intracranial bleeding, and liver laceration sustained in a vehicular accident. This case describes insignificant maternal trauma with poor fetal outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.99699239413303
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/8. Intrauterine growing skull fracture.

    Growing skull fractures with development of leptomeningeal cysts are rare complications of head injuries and have not been described in the perinatal period. The case history of a newborn with bilateral parietal fractures and the formation of a leptomeningeal cyst on one side detected at birth is presented. The importance of radiographic evaluation, including skull films, computered tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the associated subarachnoid cyst and the age of presentation are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.9907136094199
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/8. Multiple uterine rupture and crushing injury of the fetal skull after blunt maternal trauma. A case report.

    Multiple pelvic fractures and explosive-type uterine lacerations occurred in a previously healthy 17-year-old primigravida involved in a motor vehicle accident. The fetus suffered a crushed skull and was completely extruded with the placenta from the uterus. Treatment was complicated by severe disseminated intravascular coagulation with secondary fibrinolysis. thrombelastography enabled us to rapidly evaluate the patient's coagulation status and to monitor her response to goal-directed therapeutic interventions (surgery, specific blood product therapy and epsilon-aminocaproic acid).
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.016727770306064
keywords = fracture, skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/8. Intrauterine depressed skull fracture. A report of two cases.

    Two cases of intrauterine depressed fracture are presented. In each case, the mother had no history of abdominal trauma during pregnancy, the children were delivered normally without the use of forceps, but a round depression was present in the left frontal bone at time of delivery. CT scans demonstrated a depressed fracture of the left frontal bone and stagnation of cerebrospinal fluid around the fracture. Elevation of the depression was therefore made through a small incision along the rear edge of the frontal bone using a periosteal elevator. A review of intrauterine depressed skull fracture is made and the concept, mechanism, surgical indications and operative methods of this rare fracture are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4.996992394133
keywords = skull fracture, fracture, skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/8. Porencephaly secondary to fetal trauma during amniocentesis.

    BACKGROUND: There has been one reported case of porencephaly diagnosed postnatally as a result of amniocentesis. We report the first antenatal diagnosis of porencephaly, which apparently resulted from penetration of the fetal skull during amniocentesis. CASE: A 37-year-old woman had genetic amniocentesis at 16 weeks' gestation. The fetal skull was penetrated during the unguided procedure. Porencephaly discovered at 28 weeks' gestation was confirmed by imaging studies in the neonatal period. CONCLUSION: Inadvertent fetal skull penetration appeared to result from amniocentesis unguided by continuous ultrasound.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0082320986634561
keywords = skull
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/8. An unexpected fetal outcome following a severe maternal motor vehicle accident.

    BACKGROUND: Maternal motor vehicle injury occurs commonly and can cause serious fetal injury. Optimum pregnancy management at the time of maternal presentation following trauma requires reliable methods of fetal assessment. In this report, we present a case in which currently accepted methods of fetal assessment initially failed to demonstrate catastrophic fetal brain injury following a maternal motor vehicle accident. CASE: A 28-year-old primigravida woman at 27 weeks' gestation was in a pedestrian motor vehicle accident, suffering a closed head injury and multiple fractures. Initial fetal assessment included cardiotocographic monitoring for 24 hours fetal ultrasound, both of which were normal, as was a biophysical profile done on the fifth day after the accident. These were repeated at intervals, but definite evidence of fetal brain injury was not seen until unilateral ventricular dilatation was documented on ultrasound at 35 weeks' gestation. Postnatal imaging showed microcephaly, hydrocephalus ex vacuo, and multiple hemispheric hypodensities, likely representing post-traumatic hemorrhages with secondary infarction. At the age of 4 years, the child is cortically blind, epileptic, and quadriparetic. CONCLUSION: This pregnancy outcome was unexpectedly poor despite the reassuring initial assessment. We caution that these methods may not provide accurate early fetal assessment, especially when fetal brain stem function is spared.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0030076058669707
keywords = fracture
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Prenatal Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.