Cases reported "Pressure Ulcer"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/92. Treating stage IV pressure ulcers with negative pressure therapy: a case report.

    Decubitus ulcers remain a significant healthcare concern today, especially in the elderly and immobile population. Following the observation of three Stage IV decubitus ulcers refractory to standard medical and surgical therapy for 10 months, a new vacuum-assisted closure device (V.A.C.) was initiated to speed wound healing. The V.A.C. was initiated in August 1996. The three Stage IV ulcers were located on the patient's right ischium, left ischium, and sacrum. On initiation, they measured 7 1/2 cm x 2 1/2 cm x 2 1/2 cm, 8 cm x 3 1/2 cm x 2 1/2 cm, and 3 1/2 cm x 2 cm x 2 cm respectively. The treatment consisted of insertion of sterile sponge into the wound bed connected to the negative pressure device by suction hose. The device operated at a negative pressure of 125 mm Hg with a 5-minute-on 2-minute-off-cycle. Dressing changes were performed every 48 hours during the treatment period. Successful closure of the sacral ulcer occurred in October 1996. The ischial ulcers were small enough to be taken off V.A.C. therapy in early November 1996. While we are encouraged by the results of this study, further additional clinical studies are warranted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/92. Anterior flap for coverage following hip disarticulation for osteomyelitis.

    The use of a posterior myocutaneous flap is the most common method of coverage following hip disarticulation. Other options for coverage following hemipelvectomy have been described mainly when the conventional flap is unavailable owing to tumor involvement. We report a case of hip disarticulation for a decubitus ulcer with underlying osteomyelitis of the proximal femur; coverage was obtained using an anterior myocutaneous flap. In this case, two previous unsuccessful attempts at wound coverage prior to the hip disarticulation using a lateral and a posterior flap made the anterior flap the best available option for closure. Complete healing was achieved within two months.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/92. Maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable wounds.

    BACKGROUND: Fly maggots have been known for centuries to help debride and heal wounds. Maggot therapy was first introduced in the USA in 1931 and was routinely used there until the mid-1940s in over 300 hospitals. With the advent of antimicrobiols, maggot therapy became rare until the early 1990s, when it was re-introduced in the USA, UK, and israel. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable, chronic wounds and ulcers in long-term hospitalized patients in israel. methods: Twenty-five patients, suffering mostly from chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores in the lower sacral area, were treated in an open study using maggots of the green bottle fly, Phaenicia sericata. The wounds had been present for 1-90 months before maggot therapy was applied. Thirty-five wounds were located on the foot or calf of the patients, one on the thumb, while the pressure sores were on the lower back. Sterile maggots (50-1000) were administered to the wound two to five times weekly and replaced every 1-2 days. Hospitalized patients were treated in five departments of the Hadassah Hospital, two geriatric hospitals, and one outpatient clinic in Jerusalem. The underlying diseases or the causes of the development of wounds were venous stasis (12), paraplegia (5), hemiplegia (2), Birger's disease (1), lymphostasis (1), thalassemia (1), polycythemia (1), dementia (1), and basal cell carcinoma (1). Subjects were examined daily or every second day until complete debridement of the wound was noted. RESULTS: Complete debridement was achieved in 38 wounds (88.4%); in three wounds (7%), the debridement was significant, in one (2.3%) partial, and one wound (2.3%) remained unchanged. In five patients who were referred for amputation of the leg, the extremities was salvaged after maggot therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot therapy is a relatively rapid and effective treatment, particularly in large necrotic wounds requiring debridement and resistant to conventional treatment and conservative surgical intervention.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 7.5
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/92. The reversal sural artery neurocutaneous island flap in composite lower extremity wound reconstruction.

    Reconstruction of the lower third of the leg and the forefoot remains a challenge due to a lack of regional muscle units and minimal subcutaneous tissues. Reverse island flaps have been applied to similar reconstructive problems in the upper extremity. Recently, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap has been utilized to reconstruct complex wounds of the lower extremity and forefoot in young and middle-aged individuals. We present our use of the flap in a patient cohort 65 years of age or older. Unique among this group was the high prevalence of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Nonetheless, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap proved a safe and reliable means of achieving wound closure.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/92. Free flaps for reconstruction of the lower back and sacral area.

    Free flap reconstruction of the lower back and sacrum is complicated by a paucity of recipient vessels and difficulties in postoperative care. From 1983 to 1997, six patients with intractable wounds of the lower back and sacral area were treated with free flaps. The flaps used were latissimus dorsi (three), combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior (one), and filleted leg tissue (two). The recipient vessels were the deep femoral vessels, the perforator vessels of the deep femoral system, the inferior epigastric vessels, and the superior gluteal and inferior gluteal vessels. The patients were observed in the intensive care unit for 1 week and kept in prone position for 4 weeks. All flaps survived and wounds healed primarily. For large or multiple defects of the lower back and sacrum, free tissue transfer is effective in achieving primary healing, particularly when local flaps are inadequate or have failed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/92. Congenital pressure necrosis of the forearm in a newborn infant.

    The authors report a case of congenital pressure necrosis of the forearm presenting in a newborn infant. The patient presented with an edematous and purpuric upper extremity with no underlying vascular compromise. After demarcation of the nonviable tissue during the first month of life, the extremity was debrided, and a thin split-thickness skin graft was applied. Graft contracture over the subsequent year was released and reconstructed with a full-thickness skin graft. Patient follow-up at age 22 months demonstrated progressive return of strength and function of the extremity with restoration of soft-tissue bulk and contour. When presented with this unusual circumstance, the plastic surgeon should be familiar with its differential diagnosis and management. Conservative debridement and age-appropriate resurfacing of the remaining wound were the essential treatment principles followed in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/92. Case study: the treatment or palliative care of pressure ulcers.

    As nurse education increases there are reduced justifications for the existence of pressure ulcers. Patient assessment, along with rationalization of equipment and repositioning techniques, reduces the potential for pressure ulcer formation. Therefore, the future for pressure ulcer prevention will rely on nurse education and motivation. The patient featured in this case study suffered unnecessarily from pressure ulcers as, after her admission to a new nursing home where she was given the appropriate pressure-relieving and wound-dressing treatment, the ulcers were showing signs of healing.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/92. A case study in evidence-based wound management.

    On the first of July 1998, Frank Dobson, the then Secretary of State for health, revealed the consultation document 'A First Class Service' (Department of health (DoH), 1998). This article describes a wound management case study which showed how a first class service was provided for a patient with very severe pressure ulcers and complex medical problems. A multiprofessional approach to her complex and challenging problems was maintained. Evidence-based guidelines for the prevention and management of pressure damage were followed, supported by modern researched-based wound management and pressure relief. In addition, risk management strategies were observed, and provided the basis for planning and evaluating her individualized care.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/92. The role of plasma transglutaminase (F XIII) in wound healing of complicated pressure sores after spinal cord injury.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report. OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate stimulating action of F XIII in wound healing of complicated pressure sores. SETTING: A spinal cord Injury Center in germany. methods: Clinical exam, clinical and photographic wound control, biochemical serum monitoring. RESULTS: Recurrent pressure sores in plegic patients are common complications requiring long-standing conservative or operative therapy. Additional risk factors such as diabetes increase the complication rate for surgery. Surgery itself may be difficult in recurrent pressure sores due to limited remaining soft tissues. We report the case and treatment of a 47-year-old patient with long-standing and recurrent ulcers and complications after flap surgery. As a final option we added plasma transglutaminase (factor xiii) to our treatment scheme which changed the course of the disease dramatically and we achieved complete and rapid healing. CONCLUSION: Our experience suggests that F XIII has a positive role in treating pressure sores as shown already in several other surgical fields. Its use is giving the surgeon an additional tool in complicated cases.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/92. A preliminary study of the feasibility of wound telecare for the elderly.

    We have developed a method for remote wound assessment in the elderly. Wound images were taken with a digital camera at a resolution of 640x480 pixels. JPEG compression was then used to produce images of about 100 kByte. Selected clinical data were transmitted by email, together with standardized digital images of wounds. The remote physician then read the clinical data and viewed the digital images on a 38 cm colour display monitor, at a resolution of 800x600 pixels, in 16-bit colour, using standard software. Three elderly inpatients with pressure sores or leg ulcers had both bedside and remote examinations, by different physicians. The diagnosis and therapeutic recommendations proposed after each of the two examinations were compared qualitatively. There was reasonable agreement between the two physicians in the assessment of wound size, anatomical classification, wound bed and status of infection. However, the lack of palpation represented a major limitation to remote wound assessment, despite the use of probes to delineate the depth of any opening in the wound bed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = wound
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Pressure Ulcer'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.