Cases reported "Prognathism"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/12. An unusual treatment with sagittal split osteotomy: report of a case involving an odontoma.

    Sagittal split osteotomy is one of the most commonly performed surgical techniques in the world and has been modified by many authors. The efficacy of this operation has been studied by many groups. When performing this surgery, there should be adequate contact of wide, cancellous bone surfaces, which guarantees excellent and rapid bony union in the desired position. In the present article, treatment of mandibular prognathism with open bite by sagittal split osteotomy with an odontoma in the third molar area is presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/12. The reconstruction of bilateral clefts using endosseous implants after bone grafting.

    This article presents the orthodontic reconstruction of an adult bilateral cleft patient with a severe Class III malocclusion in which endosseous implants were inserted after secondary alveolar bone grafting. The patient was a 21-year-old Japanese male whose lateral incisors were congenitally missing and whose premaxilla was inclined lingually. The occlusion was classified as Angle Class III with an overjet of -8 mm. Orthodontic alignment was initiated to correct the position of the maxillary incisors before bone grafting. After the anterior occlusal relationship was corrected, bilateral alveolar clefts were reconstructed by bone grafting with autogenous particulate marrow and cancellous bone harvested from the iliac crest. ITI-SLA fixtures (Institute Straumann, Waldenburg, switzerland) (length, 10 mm; diameter, 4.1 mm) were placed into the grafted bone for prosthetic restoration of the missing lateral incisors. The results illustrate that this protocol can be expected to provide an acceptable occlusion and good dentoalveolar stability in adult cleft patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 9
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/12. Indications and procedures for segmental dentoalveolar osteotomy: a review of 13 patients.

    The authors evaluated the surgical area, indications, and procedures for segmental dentoalveolar osteotomy carried out on 16 jaws in 13 patients treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of medicine, between 1990 and 2001. osteotomy was indicated mainly in cases where tooth repositioning by orthodontic treatment was limited, where social conditions (e.g., age, time, finances) precluded orthodontic treatment, or where revision of orthodontic or surgical treatment was required. In cases of maxillary anterior segmental dentoalveolar osteotomy, the modified Wunderer method was used, where after an incision was made in the palatal mucosa, a mucoperiosteal flap was abraded as much as possible until the area of the osteotomy on the palatal side could be visualized. In maxillary posterior segmental dentoalveolar osteotomy, the operation was carried out in 2 stages because of the risk of necrosis of the bone fragments. In the first stage, an osteotomy was carried out on the vestibular side, since the vestibular gingival pedicle was intact. In the second stage, 3 weeks later, another osteotomy was performed after the palatal mucoperiosteal flap was abraded to visualize the area of the osteotomy as well as that of the maxillary anterior segmental dentoalveolar osteotomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/12. hajdu-cheney syndrome (acro-osteolysis): a case report of dental interest.

    hajdu-cheney syndrome (acro-osteolysis) is a rare disorder of bone metabolism characterized by progressive lytic lesions in a number of bones. Constant features of this condition include an osteoporotic skeleton, acro-osteolysis, and a shortened lower third of face. The purpose of this report was to focus on the craniofacial and oral manifestations of the disorder in a 9-year-old boy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/12. New oral-acral syndrome with partial agenesis of the maxillary bones.

    We report on a woman with congenital defect of the anterior part of the maxillary bone (including absence of incisors and canines) without cleft lip or palate, and ectrodactyly of the feet. This syndrome appears to represent a new entity of unknown cause.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 5
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/12. Internal midface distraction in correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate.

    BACKGROUND: Maxillary hypoplasia is a familiar deformity in patients with cleft lip and palate. A large amount of maxilla advancement is often needed to correct the severe deformity, but local soft-tissue scars around the maxilla restrict maxilla advancement and increase the relapse rate. By gradually lengthening both the bones and the soft tissues, midface distraction can greatly increase postoperative stability and lower the relapse rate. methods: Ten patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate were treated with midface distraction using three kinds of internal distraction devices. Among them, six patients received an alveolar bone graft from the iliac crest during their Le Fort I osteotomy, and a bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy was performed simultaneously to push back the mandible in five patients with prognathia, to obtain a normal soft-tissue profile and occlusal relationship. RESULTS: Successful maxillary advancements ranging from 5 to 15 mm were measured from preoperative and postoperative cephalograms. patients' sella-nasion-point A angles increased from an average of 71.25 degrees preoperatively to 79.05 degrees postoperatively. Orthodontic therapies were adopted before and/or after midface distraction. After the consolidation period, dense new bone was found to have formed in the distraction gap. During the follow-up period, the position of the maxilla and the final occlusal relationship were stable and acceptable, and no obvious relapses were seen. CONCLUSION: Midface distraction is an ideal choice for the correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and/or palate.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/12. cleidocranial dysplasia: diagnostic criteria and combined treatment.

    cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is an uncommon, generalized skeletal disorder characterized by delayed ossification of the skull, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, and serious, complex dental abnormalities. There are many difficulties in the early diagnosis of CCD because a majority of the craniofacial abnormalities becomes obvious only during adolescence. In the present case, a hypoplastic midface, a relative prognathia of the mandible, and close approximation of the shoulders in the anterior plane were the conspicuous extraoral findings. Prolonged exfoliation of the primary dentition, unerupted supernumerary teeth, and the irregularly and partially erupted secondary dentition produced occlusional anomalies. The presence of the second permanent molars together with the primary dentition and wide spacing in the lower incisor area were typical dental signs. Gradual extraction of the supernumerary teeth and over-retained primary teeth was the first step of oral surgery. This was followed by a surgical exposure of the unerupted teeth by thinning of the cortical bone. Orthodontic treatment was aimed at parallel growth of the jaws. Removable appliances were used to expand the narrow maxillary and mandibular arches, and a Delaire mask compensated for the lack of sagittal growth of the upper jaw. Temporary functional rehabilitation was solved by partial denture. When the jaws have been fully developed, implant insertions and bridges are the therapeutic measures. The reported case and the literature data support the importance of the early diagnosis and interdisciplinary treatment of CCD.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/12. Correction of jaw deformities subsequent to treatment of acromegaly.

    In acromegaly, growth of facial bones and changes of oral and laryngeal mucosa are well accepted facts. orthognathic surgical procedures should in these cases be postponed until the acromegalic process is well controlled. 2 cases of mandibular osteotomies (patients aged 61 and 38 years) are reported. The surgical procedures and the postoperative course of these patients were uneventful and did not deviate from those of otherwise healthy patients.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/12. Surgical correction of residual facial deformity following treatment of acromegaly.

    The features and treatment of acromegaly are described and emphasis placed on the apparent failure of the bone deformities to regress. A method of one stage correction of such residual facial deformity is described and illustrated in a patient with deformities of the mandible, frontal, zygomatic and nasal bones, nine years after hypophysectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/12. Mandibular deformity associated with Paget's disease. Case report.

    Paget's disease (osteitis deformans) and osteoporosis represent the commonest systemic bone disorders. Clinically Paget's disease may be mono-, or polyostotic, and is characterized by excessive and disorganized formation and resorption of bone. It may affect any of the facial bones, most notably the skull and the jaws. A case is described in which the only symptomatic manifestation of Paget's disease was mandibular prognathism. The pathogenesis, aetiology, and management are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = bone
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Prognathism'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.