Cases reported "Prostatic Hyperplasia"

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11/79. Paneth cell-like metaplasia of the prostate gland.

    We report two cases of Paneth cell-like metaplasia of the prostate gland, one in poorly differentiated carcinoma and the second in benign hyperplasia. By light microscopy, the Paneth-like cells were indistinguishable from paneth cells found in the normal small intestine and ultrastructurally showed electron-dense granules typical of paneth cells. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase and negative for lysozyme and alpha 1-antitrypsin. The clinical significance of Paneth cell-like metaplasia is unknown and may represent an example of the multipotential metaplastic capability of actively dividing cells.
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12/79. Basal cell hyperplasia of prostate: an elusive lesion?

    We report a case of basal cell hyperplasia of the prostate accompanying benign prostatic hypertrophy. The histogenesis of the basal cells as well as the histologic features and differential diagnosis of basal cell hyperplasia are reviewed.
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13/79. Transurethral electrovaporization for giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a case.

    Although open simple prostatectomy remains the reference standard for the treatment of excessively large or giant prostatic hyperplasia, advances in technology and techniques have facilitated safe transurethral management of select cases. We report a case undergoing removal over 200 g of prostatic adenoma by three transurethral electrovaporization (TVP) sessions and discuss its feasibility in clinical use.
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14/79. "Alphabet soup" and the prostate: LUTS, BPH, BPE, and BOO.

    The patient described, though not typical, is one among many of those of the aging male population in whom their primary care physicians will increasingly diagnose diseases affecting the prostate gland. Primary care physicians then will offer first-line therapy not only for prostatic diseases but also for concurrent sexual and erectile dysfunction. This brief primer for primary care physicians "unscrambles" the alphabet in a "soup" of initialisms and acronyms for lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia, benign prostatic enlargement, and bladder outlet obstruction.
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15/79. Preperitoneal laparoscopic simple prostatectomy.

    Simple prostatectomy has been a mainstay of therapy for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We describe a preperitoneal laparoscopic approach for resection of large prostatic adenomas. We believe this is a viable and less invasive alternative to the traditional open approaches used for simple prostatectomy.
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16/79. A case report: Leukaemic infiltration and hyperplasia of the prostate.

    Leukaemic infiltration of prostate with hyperplasia is a rare manifestation and is usually found in known cases of leukaemia, but it may be the first sign of an undiagnosed leukaemia. In this report, a rare case of leukaemic infiltration of the prostate in a 64-year-old man is represented.
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17/79. Basal cell proliferations of the prostate other than usual basal cell hyperplasia: a clinicopathologic study of 23 cases, including four carcinomas, with a proposed classification.

    Basaloid proliferations of the prostate with morphologic patterns other than usual basal cell hyperplasia are rare, and the distinction between benign and malignant lesions has been difficult. We describe 23 such lesions and classify them into two groups: adenoid cystic-like hyperplasia and adenoid cystic or basaloid carcinoma. Adenoid cystic-like hyperplasia (n = 19) was characterized by an older age at presentation (mean, 71.8 years), transition zone location with background of nodular hyperplasia, multifocality, lobulation, circumscription, and small acini with occasional hyalinization. A cribriform pattern limited to small- and medium-sized glands, squamous metaplasia, and hypercellular myxoid stroma were occasionally seen. Adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 3) was characterized by a younger age at presentation (mean, 46.0 years), peripheral zone involvement, and large acini that were often dilated and exhibited extensive interanastomoses, prominent intraglandular hyalinization, perineural invasion, and extraprostatic extension. Basaloid carcinoma (n = 1) showed infiltration between normal glands, perineural invasion, and extraprostatic extension but lacked a cribriform architecture. The degree of cytologic atypia and mitotic rate overlapped between the hyperplasia and carcinoma cases. Both hyperplastic lesions and adenoid cystic carcinomas showed a basal cell phenotype with strong immunoreactivity to cytokeratins 14 and 34betaE12, but the basaloid carcinoma was negative for these markers. In all cases, the proliferating basal cells were nonreactive for myoepithelial and prostatic secretory cell markers. The 8 patients with adenoid cystic-like hyperplasia with available follow-up information had no progression of disease (mean follow-up period, 8.6 years). One patient with adenoid cystic carcinoma died with widespread metastases, but the 3 other patients with carcinomas had no disease progression (mean follow-up period, 7.0 years). In conclusion, most florid basaloid proliferations of the prostate fall into one of two categories. In the first, there is a clear association with nodular hyperplasia (adenoid cystic-like hyperplasia) and, although cytologic atypia and mitoses may be seen, they are present within a lesion that retains an orderly, vaguely nodular (noninfiltrative) pattern. The second group of cases (adenoid cystic and basaloid carcinoma) shows a widespread, haphazard infiltrative growth pattern. This study suggests that adenoid cystic carcinomas are biologically indolent following prostatectomy but have a low risk of distant metastasis.
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ranking = 12
keywords = hyperplasia
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18/79. A life-threatening case of stenosing pill hypopharynx-oesophagitis caused by a tamsulosin capsule.

    Pill oesophagitis is a frequent clinical entity that may induce dysphagia and exceptionally oesophageal occlusion. The mechanisms inducing mucosal inflammation are not completely defined, but oesophageal damage occurring when the caustic content of a drug remains in the oesophagus long enough to produce mucosal lesions seems to be a main factor. We report a case of a life-threatening stenosing pill hypopharynx-oesophagitis caused by the ingestion of a capsule of tamsulosin, a drug diffusely used for benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment.
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19/79. Unresolved priapism secondary to tamsulosin.

    Tamsulosin is the most potent adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. priapism has been reported rarely in patients taking prazosin, doxazosin and Terazosin. We describe an otherwise healthy man with recurrent and then persistent unresolved priapism after the use of tamsulosin. Initial treatment consisted of aspiration and intracavernosal irrigation of iced saline and vasoconstrictive agent, but in vain. We then performed Winters procedure but that too failed and the priapism persisted. health-care professionals should inform all patients taking such medications about rare but possible serious adverse effects.
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keywords = hyperplasia
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20/79. Giant multilocular cystadenoma of the prostate: a rare differential diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    We report a case of giant multilocular cystadenoma of the prostate in a 43-year-old man. This is a rare benign entity of the prostate imitating symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia and originates from the prostate with extensive spread into the pelvis. Histologically, prostatic glands and cysts lined by cuboid to columnar epithelial cells with basally located nuclei are characteristic. Immunohistochemical staining is positive for prostate-specific antigen in the epithelial cells. Giant multilocular prostatic cystadenoma should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis in any case of a large cystic mass originating from the prostate.
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ranking = 5
keywords = hyperplasia
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