Cases reported "Prostatic Hyperplasia"

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1/29. Unexpected transurethral resection of prostate syndrome complicated with acute myocardial infarction during transurethral incision procedure--a case report.

    Transurethral incision (TUI) is a simple and safe procedure. We, herein, present a case undergoing transurethral incision procedure during which he developed transurethral resection of prostate syndrome (TURP syndrome) and hypothermia precipitating an acute perioperative myocardial infarction attack. The potential risk of development of TURP syndrome in settings other than TURP surgery as well as its prevention are reviewed and discussed.
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2/29. Progressing prostate carcinoma.

    In the Karnell Cancer Center Grand Rounds, we present a patient who underwent radical prostatectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, but had positive margins and subsequently developed local recurrence and then systemic disease. Pathologic and radiologic aspects of his disease are discussed. Therapeutic options at different stages of the disease are examined from the point of view of the urologist, radiation oncologist, and medical oncologist. The surgical portion of the discussion focuses on the selection of initial therapy. Both the selection of surgical candidates and choice of pre- or post-operative therapy in patients can be aided by prognostic tools looking at several variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score of the tumor, seminal vesicle invasion, extracapsular invasion, and lymph node involvement. Low-risk patients can be treated with monotherapy, such as radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation therapy, prostate brachytherapy, or cryosurgical ablation of the prostate. Higher risk patients may require adjuvant and possibly neoadjuvant therapy in addition. The radiation portion of the discussion focuses on the use of radiation therapy as salvage for relapsing disease. Of particular importance is the point that treating high-risk patients whose PSA levels have started to rise but are less than 1 ng/ml results in a long-term PSA control rate as high as 75%, but that limiting the use of salvage radiation therapy to patients with high PSA levels or biopsy confirmation of local recurrence in the face of a negative bone scan results in biochemical long-term control of less than 40%. In the medical oncology part of the discussion, the major focus is on the use of chemotherapy to treat patients whose disease has become resistant to hormonal therapy. mitoxantrone plus a corticosteroid has been found to offer significant palliation for such patients. Combination therapy with estramustine plus taxanes, other microtubule inhibitors, or other agents such as topoisomerase ii inhibitors, has been found to cause shrinkage of measurable soft tissue disease and diminution of serum PSA levels. The development of effective hormonal and chemotherapeutic drugs for treatment of metastatic disease has led to new interest in adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy of high-risk patients.
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3/29. Intraoperative haemorrhage associated with the use of extract of Saw Palmetto herb: a case report and review of literature.

    The significant increase in the use of alternative medicine in general and the herbal and dietary supplement in particular represents a challenge to the health care professionals. Because of their unregulated use, physicians are encountering increasing numbers of toxicities and untoward events. We report a case of severe intraoperative haemorrhage in a patient who was taking the herb Saw Palmetto. His bleeding time which was prolonged, normalized few days after he stopped the herb. This case should increase the awareness of physicians to such possible complications and encourage them to enquire thoroughly about the use of any dietary supplement in all their patients.
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4/29. glycine toxicity and unexpected intra-operative death.

    A rare complication of the use of glycine irrigation fluid during prostatic surgery in a 69-year-old man is described. Following cystolithopexy and transurethral resection of the prostate for benign prostatomegaly, abdominal distension developed with increasing ventilatory pressures. Despite retroperitoneal fluid evacuation at subsequent urgent laparotomy, cardiac arrest occurred that was not amenable to resuscitation. At autopsy a traumatic defect in the posterior bladder wall filled with calculus debris was confirmed that did not communicate with the peritoneal cavity. hyponatremia with markedly elevated levels of blood, urine, and body fluid glycine were demonstrated. death was, therefore, attributed to glycine toxicity following tracking of glycine through a surgical defect in the posterior bladder wall. Careful dissection of surgical sites is required in such cases to demonstrate any additional trauma that may be associated with the fatal episode. Analysis of body fluids for glycine and electrolytes is also necessary to assist in the determination of possible mechanisms of death.
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5/29. ascites following prostatectomy: a rare presentation of comorbid disease.

    We report a rare case of ascites developing in the early post-prostatectomy period due to a mass originating from the head of the pancreas. Comorbid diseases that are not documented preoperatively may emerge with signs mimicking the complication of prostate surgery.
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6/29. cauda equina syndrome after induction of spinal anesthesia.

    In this report the authors present a case of cauda equina syndrome that developed following induction of spinal anesthesia in a patient who had no apparent preexisting bleeding abnormality. An acute subdural hematoma caused the syndrome and was believed to have resulted from direct vascular trauma during administration of spinal anesthesia or from vascular trauma combined with thrombocytopenia in the postoperative period.
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7/29. methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus endocarditis after transurethral prostatic resection.

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus endocarditis complicating transurethral prostatic resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The patient had been catheterized preoperatively because of urinary retention and, postoperatively, developed pyrexia with persistent methicillin-resistant S. aureus-positive blood cultures. The cause remained elusive, despite extensive investigations (including echocardiography), until he developed embolic phenomena pathognomonic of infective endocarditis 1 month into treatment with intravenous vancomycin.
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8/29. Extraperitoneal laparoscopic prostatectomy (adenomectomy) for obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia: transvesical and transcapsular (Millin) techniques.

    PURPOSE: We describe extraperitoneal laparoscopic resection of large prostatic adenomas (<100 g) as an alternative to open simple prostatectomy by both the transcapsular or Millin and the transvesical approaches. patients AND methods: We have performed more than 20 laparoscopic prostatectomies (adenomectomies) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) for glands >100 g. The initial two cases, with follow-up longer than 1 year, are included in this report. Using an extraperitoneal approach, enucleation of the obstructing prostatic lobes was performed with the aid of a Harmonic Scalpel and laparoscopic claw forceps. Hemostatic sutures were placed at 5 and 7 o'clock. The urethrovesical junction (transvesical) or capsulotomy (Millin) were closed in an interrupted fashion using intracorporeal sutures. RESULTS: Both procedures were successful. The total operative time was 180 minutes for first the case and 120 minutes for the second. The adenoma removed was approximately 138 g in the first case and 102 g in the second case. The estimated blood loss was <50 mL and <200 mL, respectively. The postoperative courses were unremarkable. Analgesic requirements were minimal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2 and 3, respectively. A follow-up examination at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months showed that the flow rate is >20 mL and the postvoiding residual volume 0, with normal continence and sexual potency in both men. CONCLUSIONS: Extraperitoneal laparoscopic simple prostatectomy is a simple straightforward technique. Minimal bleeding, a reduced transfusion rate, shorter hospitalization, and faster recovery are additional advantages. This minimally invasive technique is a reasonable alternative to open simple prostatectomy for large glands with reduced morbidity.
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ranking = 3
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9/29. A case of a large inguinoscrotal bladder hernia secondary to benign prostatic obstruction.

    Large bladder hernias protruding into the scrotum are rare, with 23 cases having been reported previously in japan. We report a case of a patient with a bladder hernia secondary to benign prostatic obstruction who demonstrated a unique voiding procedure. The patient manually compressed his scrotum at micturition to facilitate bladder emptying. He underwent subcapsular prostatectomy, followed by inguinal hernia repair. Postoperatively, the voiding procedure and urinary flow returned to normal. We should pay attention to symptoms of bladder hernia in the follow-up of patients with bladder outlet obstruction.
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10/29. Bilateral ischemic optic neuropathy after transurethral prostatic resection: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy affects the anterior portion of the optic nerve and is characterized by sudden, painless visual loss. The affected eye has a relative afferent pupillary defect. The typical funduscopic appearance includes optic disc edema, with associated nerve fiber layer hemorrhage. risk factors include advanced age, systemic hypertension, nocturnal hypotension, diabetes mellitus, and a small cup-to-disc ratio. Bilateral presentation is rare. Postoperative optic neuropathy has been associated with nonocular surgery; risk factors include a combination of prolonged surgical times, acute systemic hypotension, anemia due to blood loss, or prone positioning. We report for the first time a patient with bilateral, simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after elective transurethral prostatic resection. CASE PRESENTATION: A 66-year old man underwent surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The preoperative blood pressure was 140/85 mmHg, hemoglobin 15.9 g/dL, and hematocrit 48.6%. Two hours postoperatively, the blood pressure, hemoglobin, and hematocrit dropped dramatically. One day later, transient horizontal diplopia developed. Funduscopy showed a congenitally small cup-to-disc ratio without papillary edema. Other ocular findings were unremarkable. By 4 days postoperatively, sudden and painless amaurosis bilaterally developed when the patient awoke with nausea and vomiting. visual acuity was no light perception bilaterally. The optic discs were swollen with small hemorrhages. Scans of the head and orbits and electrolyte levels were normal. There were no responses on visual evoked potentials bilaterally. The blood pressure was 90/50 mm Hg, the hemoglobin 7.0 g/dL, and the hematocrit 22.9%, necessitating infusion of three units of packed red blood cells. The blood pressure, hematocrit, and hemoglobin increased to normal levels. Three months later the visual acuity remained no light perception. The pupils were unreactive and there was marked optic disc atrophy bilaterally. CONCLUSION: Bilateral and simultaneous acute ischemic optic neuropathy may be a rare but devastating surgical complication. The combination of anemia and hypotension may increase the risk of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy postoperatively after transurethral prostatic resection.
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