Cases reported "Prostatic Hyperplasia"

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1/60. Concomitant renal and prostatic aspergillosis.

    aspergillosis limited to the urinary tract is a rare disease seen most often in patients with altered immune status. Only 19 cases of renal aspergillosis including 3 with AIDS and 4 cases of isolated prostatic aspergillosis have been reported. We report the first case of concomitant renal and prostatic aspergillosis in a non-immunocompromised patient who presented with pyrexia of unknown origin and with dysuria. The diagnosis was based on the demonstration of characteristic hyphal elements on direct microscopy and isolation of the fungus in the culture of pus from the kidney. In view of obstructive prostatic enlargement and left non-functioning renal mass, transurethral resection of the prostate and left nephrectomy were performed in a single session with successful outcome. The aetiopathogenesis and brief review of the literature are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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2/60. Inferior vena cava compression due to massive hydronephrosis from bladder outlet obstruction.

    A 71-year-old man presented with acute urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia and was found to have computed tomography-documented mechanical obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) due to massive hydronephrosis. Obstruction of IVC flow promptly resolved after bladder decompression.
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ranking = 58.289011324683
keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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3/60. diagnosis of retrovesical ectopic and hyperplastic prostate tissue by transrectal needle biopsy.

    We report on an ectopic prostate in a 50-year-old man. Transabdominal ultrasonography, pelvic computed tomography, and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneous tumor 8 cm in diameter in contact with the posterior wall of the urinary bladder. The tumor was histologically confirmed to be a benign prostatic hyperplasia. This is the 3rd case of retrovesical ectopic prostatic tissue which was diagnosed by transrectal needle biopsy.
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keywords = urinary
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4/60. Isolated invasive candidal prostatitis.

    Fungal prostatitis is an uncommon entity. Herein we report a case of isolated candidal prostatitis in an elderly patient who presented with acute urinary retention and was clinically diagnosed as having benign hypertrophy of the prostate. histology of the resected prostate demonstrated invasive prostatic involvement by candida albicans. There was no evidence of systemic involvement by Candida. The relevant literature and treatment of isolated Candidal prostatitis have been highlighted.
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ranking = 58.289011324683
keywords = urinary retention, retention, urinary
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5/60. Treatment options in benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    Surgery remains the first choice in patients with progressive urinary symptoms. Medical therapy--with antiandrogens, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, or alpha-adrenergic antagonists--may be useful in selected cases.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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6/60. Large solitary fibrous tumor of the seminal vesicle.

    solitary fibrous tumors show a classic morphologic pattern ("patternless pattern") consisting mainly of a proliferation of bland spindle cells with varying amounts of thick, often hyalinized or keloid-like, intercellular collagen bundles. immunohistochemistry shows a strong reactivity for CD34 antigen, vimentin, and, in a variable percentage, bcl-2 antigen. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with a large solitary fibrous tumor located in the pelvic cavity with a rare nonspecific histologic pattern of pseudovascular formations. The patient underwent pelvic exenteration with orthotopic continent urinary diversion and sigmoid-J-pouch bowel reconstruction. No signs of tumor recurrence were noted within 24 months of surgery.
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ranking = 1
keywords = urinary
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7/60. A rare complication of a prostatic stent.

    We describe a case in which an elderly man with deteriorating lower urinary tract symptoms had problems with an indwelling prostatic stent. We discuss the merits of prostatic stents and recommend indications for their use.
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keywords = urinary
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8/60. "Alphabet soup" and the prostate: LUTS, BPH, BPE, and BOO.

    The patient described, though not typical, is one among many of those of the aging male population in whom their primary care physicians will increasingly diagnose diseases affecting the prostate gland. Primary care physicians then will offer first-line therapy not only for prostatic diseases but also for concurrent sexual and erectile dysfunction. This brief primer for primary care physicians "unscrambles" the alphabet in a "soup" of initialisms and acronyms for lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia, benign prostatic enlargement, and bladder outlet obstruction.
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keywords = urinary
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9/60. Transurethral microwave therapy of the prostate.

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) is a medical condition causing obstructive urinary symptoms that will inevitably affect the majority of the male population. Treatments for BPH have traditionally included invasive surgical intervention to resect a portion of the prostate as a relief of obstructive symptoms or medications that act in several ways to open the urinary channel and relieve symptoms. A new, less invasive treatment for BPH has now been developed and approved. Transurethral microwave therapy is discussed in this article. A case study is presented.
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ranking = 2
keywords = urinary
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10/60. Deep vein thrombosis associated with distension of the urinary bladder due to benign prostatic hypertrophy--a case report.

    A 76-year-old man was admitted with a first episode of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of his left leg. It was associated with a distended urinary bladder, due to benign prostatic hypertrophy. Screening for malignancy was negative. Laboratory testing revealed protein s deficiency. Although a distended bladder may induce venous stasis, it is not a proven risk factor for DVT. Clinical expression possibly depends on the concomitance of other risk factors, such as inherited or acquired thrombophilic defects. However, it is also possible that the association of a distended bladder with DVT of a lower limb has not been recognised yet. As a distended bladder is rather common in elderly men, a proper study is warranted to estimate the prevalence of associated DVT.
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ranking = 5
keywords = urinary
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