Cases reported "Prostatic Neoplasms"

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11/926. Frequency of flutamide induced hepatotoxicity in patients with prostate carcinoma.

    To identify and describe the frequency and severity of hepatotoxicity in patients who received flutamide therapy for prostate cancer, 22 patients were treated with the combination of flutamide and goserilin or orchiectomy. After diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer, baseline results were obtained for a set of five liver function tests (LF Ts). Hepatotoxicity was assessed according to the WHO criteria. After initiation of flutamide therapy, LF Ts were performed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks and every 2 months thereafter. Severe hepatotoxicity appeared in two of 22 (9%) patients. Following the discontinuation of flutamide, one patient died due to acute liver failure. On the other patient an improvement of LF Ts occurred after cessation of flutamide. The observed severe hepatotoxicity in two of 22 (9%) patients occurred more frequent than is predicted in the literature. patients treated with flutamide, having symptomatic or asymptomatic liver enzyme elevations, should be taken off therapy as soon as possible.
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ranking = 1
keywords = cancer
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12/926. Progressive prostate cancer associated with use of megestrol acetate administered for control of hot flashes.

    Low doses of megestrol acetate are frequently used for treatment of hot flashes in men having androgen ablation for prostate cancer. We report a case in which megestrol acetate (20 mg bid) was administered for symptomatic control of hot flashes in a medically castrated patient with prostate cancer. The patient was subsequently noted to have a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. megestrol acetate administration was discontinued, and the PSA level declined. These data indicate that even the low doses of megestrol acetate used for control of hot flashes can be associated with PSA increases in some patients with prostate cancer.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = cancer
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13/926. Surgical excision of a metastatic adrenal lesion in a patient with prostatic cancer.

    BACKGROUND: A 64-year-old Japanese man with stage D2 prostatic cancer, after having responded dramatically to androgen ablation, demonstrated a solitary adrenal metastasis without disease progression to any other site. methods: A surgical excision of the lesion and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy was performed. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The patient has since remained alive without any evidence of recurrence 21 months after surgery.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cancer
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14/926. A case of prostatic cancer metastasizing to the orbit.

    PURPOSE: We report on a case of prostatic cancer with multiple bone metastases, including right orbital involvement. methods/RESULTS: Hormonal treatment and local irradiation to the right orbit were performed. Subjective symptoms with exophthalmos and pain disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: We report on a case of prostatic cancer metastasizing to the right orbital bone.
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ranking = 3
keywords = cancer
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15/926. radiotherapy of prostatic cancer.

    The methods of treatment and the general guidelines in the treatment of prostatic cancer are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon treatment planning with the help of ultrasonography and the use of high energy photons.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cancer
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16/926. Gingival metastasis from a prostate adenocarcinoma: report of a case.

    Prostate cancer is the cause of 10% of cancer-related deaths in males in the united states. Metastases are found late in the course of the disease. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity are rare, representing about 1% of oral tumors and affect jaws much more frequently than soft tissues. Metastatic prostate cancer tends to involve the bones of the axial skeleton. In a recent review, 22 cases of metastases to the jawbones from prostate cancer were found in 390 cases. On the other hand, only 1 case of a metastasis to the oral soft tissues was reported. The authors describe the second case of oral soft tissue metastasis from a prostate cancer. The metastatic lesion was located in the gingiva. Clinicians should be aware of oral soft tissue metastases since they can be the first sign of a not yet diagnosed malignant tumor and they can be very easily confused with several different benign lesions.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = cancer
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17/926. Mucin-producing carcinoma of the prostate: review of 88 cases.

    OBJECTIVES: To report on a case of mucinous carcinoma of the prostate and discuss the clinical and histopathologic features of the mucin-producing carcinoma of the prostate from a review of published reports. methods: Our case and 87 other previously reported cases were evaluated clinically and histologically. RESULTS: We encountered a case of mucinous carcinoma of the prostate, Stage C, which was treated by radical prostatectomy. After reviewing it and the 87 other cases, we believe that these cases of mucin-producing carcinomas can be divided into three groups: 60 cases of mucinous carcinoma, 17 cases of primary signet-ring cell carcinoma, and 11 cases of mucinous carcinoma with signet-ring cells. Mucinous carcinoma is a variant of high-grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate, wherein there is a 77.8% rate of prostate-specific antigen elevation and a similar rate (77.8%) of response to endocrine therapy. Fifty percent of patients survived 3 years and 25%, 5 years. In contrast, primary signet-ring cell carcinoma conveys one of the worst prognoses among patients with prostate cancer. There are no reliable tumor markers, and there was no response to endocrine therapy. patients with primary signet-ring cell carcinoma had a 27.3% 3-year survival rate; none survived to 5 years. The clinical features of mucinous carcinoma with signet-ring cells are very similar to primary signet-ring cell carcinoma; again, there was no response to endocrine therapy and the 3-year survival rate was 16.7%. CONCLUSIONS: Although it has been suggested that mucinous carcinoma is a variant of high-grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate, signet-ring cell carcinoma and mucinous carcinoma with signet-ring cells are other variants of carcinoma that develop in the prostate, and their prognoses are very poor.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = cancer
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18/926. Prostatic signet-ring cell carcinoma: case report and literature review.

    Signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a very rare neoplasm and there have been only 38 cases reported to date. Here the 39th case of prostatic SRCC containing a small amount of neutral mucin, prostatic specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) in the signet-ring cells is reported. It was also found that some intracytoplasmic lumina were derived from the shallow or deep invagination of luminal membranes of cancer cells that formed the neoplastic glands. Using immunohistochemistry, a combination of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratins 7 and 20 as well as PSA and PSAP may be useful in differentiating prostatic primary SRCC from metastatic SRCC originating in the gastrointestinal tract.
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ranking = 0.56253783305223
keywords = cancer, neoplasm
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19/926. Prostatic cancer with huge cystic degeneration.

    This report details a case of prostatic cancer associated with cystic degeneration. A cystic mass may occur in the pelvis for various reasons. A congenital cyst is associated with an abnormality in the paramesonephric (mullerian) duct or mesonephric (wolffian) duct. An acquired cyst can be classified into three main types, retention, malignant and parasitic, however a cyst accompanying prostatic cancer is rare. In this particular case the size of the cyst under imaging was approximately 15 cm in diameter; this makes it one of the largest among those previously reported.
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ranking = 3
keywords = cancer
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20/926. Use of PC-SPES, a commercially available supplement for prostate cancer, in a patient with hormone-naive disease.

    OBJECTIVES: PC-SPES, an over-the-counter supplement, is actually a combination of eight different herbs. It is being used by patients to treat cancer of the prostate at different stages of the disease and has been commercially available since November 1996. It has been observed to dramatically decrease prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values in several patients; however, its out-of-pocket cost ($162 to $486/mo) and potential side effects must be weighed against its potential objective benefits. We reviewed its use in 1 patient. methods: A patient with clinically localized prostate cancer (T1c) with a PSA of 8.8 ng/mL, who decided to delay any conventional treatment, began treatment with 9 PC-SPES capsules/day. RESULTS: After 3 weeks, his PSA dropped to 1.4 ng/mL and after a total of 8 weeks, his PSA was less than 0.1 ng/mL (undetectable). He has continued on a maintenance dose of 6 capsules per day, decreasing to 4 capsules per day, with a continuing undetectable PSA. During this time the patient also experienced a number of strong estrogenic effects: loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, extreme breast enlargement and tenderness, reduction in overall body hair, pitting edema, and a significant drop in his lipoprotein (a) level (from 46 to 11 mg/dL). CONCLUSIONS: PC-SPES may provide additive advantages (or disadvantages) over prescribed hormonal treatments but must be compared with other hormonal and nonhormonal treatments in clinical trials with hormone-sensitive and -insensitive patients with prostate cancer to determine its future use or nonuse.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = cancer
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